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Noreen * Kitty - II my words did flow. In the cool ol sun- 
shine. Ba da da, da da. da da. da. da. da 111 miss yoyl 

I eslie - This last summer hasn't been the same without you I'll 
always rtmembet the fun times Chorale DCC etc Good luck in 
the future See you at the wedding — Anita 

Anthony - You little nerd! Unfortunately I'll see ya this 
aummerl Have a good on* anyway! — Luv, Tarry 

Pasta Chm Bonnie Betsy Grace, PJ Juhe, Kim Kathy. Brenda 
Vickie Carol ft the neighbors - Gonna miss ya Cooke 2nd The 
place lo be -> Beans 

Gregg H. - Goodbye lorever! This campus will be a lot 
brighter without your hypocritical lace to look at. Goodbye 

Chris - Thanks lor being such a duty neighbor Lnjoyed having 
you oi'er to eat all of the food Remember the goosed moose 
Heodgoose MooseH 

Judy - Good luck next year and thla summer. May the 
blue bird of happiness fly up your nose. - Lote. Rose 

Kim - Thanks for making this year a fun one Have a great sum 
mer an./ (fori I get married m Texas - Michele ft Michele 

Bob - M.T.Y should have won Spider Man You will get 
back when you graduate. - Your Roommate 

Chris - Vou ve been a great "Mother' this year I'm gonna work 
on stocking up the J D for August We're concert bound' Love 
Jo 

Kurt - Your smile Is something special, hold onto It! 
Someday it will make the right girl melt and she'll be yours 
lorever. - The Giggling Cashier 

Hey Motley Crue — I'm so glad I became part ol the group' Hai<e 
a great summer guys.' HI miss you all 1 Bye' — I wok 

Dear T.J. - Stocking Heads live! Thanks lor Hazleton. 
Umbies during finals, potatoes and a pile of memories 111 
never forget! Good luck next year. — Love. Bouc 

Tom A Chm. Terri Kurt Carolyn Wendy TJ. Jim Bill Carlle 
Twmk ~ Thanks for the fun times - Tom 

John. Steve. Mark. Terry ft Smiley — Thanks for eating 
lunch with me. - Joan 

Hose - It was really nice to have met you Keep on smiling 17/ 
miss <' Come back and visit if you re not too busy' - Melma 

Thanks for the memories everyone: Power (Chris-Frank- 
Brian). Moorto. Suchamess. Mltchelle See ya and keep in 
touch. - Howard 

Maryonn - "{ Infortunalely we can't soi. G Bi. but guess U'ho u>e 
can say G Bi to You didn't try hard enough Oh well G Bi J 
Me 

Kurt. Nate. Bill & Bill - To guys whom I've enjoyed many 
memorable times with Remember all the great times, 
especially my birthday in our third year. — Chris 

Jeannie - It was great having you live nest door to us (his year 
Keep me updated on the hondsome men tn your hie out in the real 
world' Good luck and keep posted' - Lore Karen 

Terry - I hope you rot In Hell for sll the terrible times you 
put me through. I'll never forgive you! — Nancy 

Carol Spencer - Remember the good times second semester 

Keep up the sports and traveling Lmoy yourself and best ol luck 
Keep in touch Cotistantina 

Rock n- Roll Wendy - Keep on rock in' Next semester will 
be great. Stay well, try at least - Rock n Roll Brian 

Bunnv - You must go hop and hop and oelivei all of your ecks 
and remember to put them on the right hooks Love Snake 

To Kev. Ted. Doug. Jeff. Steve. CA. Karen. Mike. Claudia. 
Paul. Joe. Cliff and all the rest - I wiah you the beat. - 
Your friend. Dan 

Yn f Kurt Bill & Stella - Thanks Kiddies' Vou guy, ore the best' 
You a/1 made 1986 the best i.ear ei>er' Let's keep in touch' T 
Schmilty 

Dear Departing Crayons - It just won't be as colorful with- 
out you in our box. You'll be missed. — Love. Purple 

To the Canoda Gang - Thanks for making the trip such a special 
one. it wouldn't hace heen the same uilbout you" - Love 
Michele ft Mtche/e 

Little Silver - Have I told you lately that I love you? Don't 
you ever forget it. Thanks for all of the memories we've 
made together. They will be what I will live off of for most 
of next year. Remember our tree at DVC? - Morristown 

Liza - You may only be a freshman but to me you are as r lose as 
an old friend I would know lor years - Love C S L 

Willie - These past three years at school wouldn't have 
been the same without you. You're the biggest and the 
best, but don't go and get a swollen head now - Winkle 

To Donna — Til always love you And I'll be your Poopsie - 

Paula. Jen, Sue. Debbie, Kim. Dee. Lorl & Lexi - ll 
doesn't get any better than you guys!! - Love. Trish 

Doug - "Don t forget your box'' - Wendy 

Leo ft Tim — Thanks lor always being there when I needed 
a shoulder! I owe you guys a lew. — Love. Maribeth 

Meg Amy. Suzanne & Dana - Hilton Head bound - Sun Skip 
per (Hallmark) Puddles. SOP D A . Ami Paradise Shuckers 
loosing dinner table and Fred the tun can' - Signed. I forget his 

name 

Deanne D — I'm really going to miss you!! Keep in touch 
or else ... Love and friendship lorever — The other floating 
heart 

Mrs Roberts You ure a great lady Keep up the good work 
Thanks for being you you ve been a great support and encourage 
ment to me I'll be back to visit Anita 

To Sexy In the Snack Bar — I'll miss my Monday snack run 
with you Keep John in line and good luck. - Ed 

Larn, S Thanks lor being there mote than you hod lo be / can I 
believe we sun wed' 

Alan - I'm crazy for you and I'll never leave you I am the 
happiest when I am with you. Let's have lots more great 
times. I love you. - Carole 

April Gaeedy and I will miss you Keep M touch! Ok do me a 
favor don t break anything over the summer and SO skiing' - 
Roomers 

Darren - I wish we had gotten to know each other sooner. 
I've really enjoyed the times we've bad together Keep in 
touch And where* my massage? — Chris L 

Larry - Tickle tickle, don I scream' Keep in touch over the sum 
mer Are you gonna miss our mirror* — Love. Jo 

Wendy and Spot together forever! 

Sorry' Hot* a great summer Thanks for a great b dav party I 
especially liked playing Mission Impossible We 7/ nail those 
suckers Hai-e fun working - MASTF.R 

Bill S - What can I aay? You do your homework well! One 
day soon things will work out Take care and good luck. - 
Maribeth 

Administration - Thank you for letting A l)ay patrons park on the 
soccer field like we always did and thanks for the use ol the can — 
A Day Committee 

Scott - Have a good summer Keep In touch Thanks for 
the help in Chem and Taxonomy. - Love, Kris 

Kirk — You've been the greatest fnend to us Keep in touch 
always' Schootbox 1 We love you' - Beans ft Tern 

To all the people I like, to all the people who like me: 
Goodbye. To those I dislike and those that dislike me 
Good Rlddens 



John I It s been fun working with you 
great next year and a great life' I' 



summer, a 

Rose 



Barb at Chuck - Have a great summer Hope to see you 
guys In August. Keep In touch. You better call or write me! 

— Love, Krlstlne Banln 

VICDQT — Thanks for being the greatest roommate teammate 
and classmate but especially friend Good luck next year' Hare ■ 
great summer See ya in August — Love'EU" 

To Chris k\ Terri - You've given me more to remember 
than either of you will ever know. May all your dreams 
come true! — Love always, Wendy 

Donna — It's been a great year I will try to keep off of those gin ■ 
straight Keep them under control next year Be good 1 - Anita 

Peel - No hat key sack in Berk 2nd. Thla ain't no gym. En- 
joy the summer. See you In Work Hall in August. - Master 

Alan St Carole - Survive the summer and you jus! might make n 
(>ood luck to both ol you Id 

Roommates — Thanks lor making me (eel at home In Berk. 
Sorry I snore. - CL 

Bob B — Thank you lor being fl part ol my lite I'm going to miss 
i on next year Just remember. I kive you always - Maribeth 

Alan ft Carole - Good luck. I'll miss you twol Love. 
Rosemary 

Chris. Tinink ft Carolyn - ft s been n pleasure but before you nil 
leave remember you aU have NK'I HAIR' Bye Melina 

Look out PAGANS ol DVC. here comes Sigma Theta! The 
pleasure was yours. - Love, Hank 

A Day s PPM Nutrient Deficiencies Doc B Herbicides Smug 
ness It's all otter, no need to mmp off that ledge 

Al honey - So long, take care, but not goodbye. Thanks 
lor the great times and so many memories Keep In touch 
See you this summer. — Love ys. Jennifer 

Monheth Giannone - Best ol luck at Penn State' Hope (Imsi 
Arctic winds don't pick up' I'm going lo miss in' - Leopard 

WAS 111 - I love the pink tie. Thanks for the wonderful 
evening. 4-11-86. A Tropical Paradise I'll never lorget! 
Thanks! - Love always. I Al 

Mookie ft The Birdmon «- Double team (he i«em nightly' Ha' Ha' 

- Zeta Chi 

Donna - You were a great roomie! Have a good two years, 
they will go fast! I hope you find the dream of your life, vou 
deserve it. Always keep smiling! - Jeannie 

Cioil C - Thonks (or being • great friend' I \m ) forget if you need 
to tell someone a secret, lust call - lore I'cf 

KD - M W.G.M.S.D - MT 

Steve Happy 21st' Cant wait lor next irjr 1 We will keep in 
touch over the summer - Your friend, Brian 

Lorl L. You piss me off you Felng Jerk! There will always be 
a special place for you in my heart. I'll miss ya! — Bill 

Mourn — Thanks lor all your help throughout the years Couldnt 
have gotten by without you Remember the good limes, tic (malli 
made It 1 - Tern 

Maggot ft Butty - I'll miss you guys a lot. Have a great 
summer and behave, if possible! - Love. Rodent 

Through fhe leoffs of Berk 1st uho like it train style ' ShofM it out' 
John - Have a great summer! Good luck with your job! 
See ya next semester! Bye! — Ewok 

Carolyn i.Moml - Thonks /o» being there uhen I needed you I 
know we'll stay in contact Remember stick u'hoo sis gajftuiuta 
heory duty stopjn goppy - Daughter "I 

Sue - It's been an interesting three years in Berk 106 
Thanks for all the hand-delivered donuts! Remember to 
keep June 20. 1987 open on your calendar! 

Ami. ,ludi Sur,inn. hi, | Otf/si Thunks for being such 
asaaj ffoorinates See you next yi " Mr ft Aff* hele 

To the Administration of DVC — Communication is the 
answer to the problem. Why not set up a bi-weekly or mon- 
thly column in Ram Paget? - Not from SLAM or SLIM 

M2 ft Tracy - Hi neighbors' It's keen fun string new to ion gins 
Thanks for al! the laughs and fun' Good fuel ill the future I 
l.ynette ft Suzanne 

Larry S. - A-Day went together well Hopefully it will do it 
again now that we're gone. 

Ofl ft lohii - A 1 ': ol the best' Lot* Irish 

Alan — It's been a year of growing and learning together 
It's not goodbye, it's I'll see you later. I love you with all my 
heart. — Love forever. Carole 

lohn M - You're still a great guy despite tour sMfcet / i«, fen 
and keep m touch' 17' miss you' - Lose M.inbefb 

You Animal - You're the best: friend, lover, teacher, cud- 
dly body, comedian and most handsome man I know. 
Don't let life change you too much! I need someone with 
all those qualities to stay a part of my life. I'd be lost 
without you!! - KD 

To the tall willowy blonde in charge ol A Day - Thank you lor 
the fun spins around the o . il the dinner dnru es F.d 

Jamie - Congrates graduate It was fun having dinner with 
you. Thanks for the rides. - Lisa. Linda. Tony. Ivy. Tracy. 
Ewok. Helen 

Wendy - Be soooble take oil your Walkman once in a while 

Brian — This ain'i no gym Take good care of your banana 
and don't spill the fecal bucket this summer. Sorry Have a 
great one! — Love. Jo 

Q I Hack. Set . Moi 2 r >th I asC ScoS ft W* ■ 

Sue - Thank God A-Day Is over. May I never have the op- 
portunity to cry with you again except in happiness. You've 
been a great friend. I'll mias you. - Love. Rose 

Wendy Fields - Keei , > . :c : 

plans ( V/fi, ks| I Hid bxajk iif us nWNISIg I nosiuotmu 

Dear Linda — You've been my dear friend for four years and 
I hope wherever our paths ,ake us we will always keep in 
touch. Go for it! - Love, your four year roomy. Kim 

Murk Mike f 10 Hosie & even Melman It s keen on expenence 

I mod ft* * M m 'rod i er nasj io l '! 

Original - Don't go crazy over the summer while studying 
here. Don't party too much. Remember the time at the 
lake - Master 

■'* if uii ket' Gonnu hm e * »ne heff ol a parti next V 

I I Ou Ml o' the t „„-,;, 

HI I RM. RAH - Thanks lor helping me through the sensi- 
tive stage of my life. And I promise not lo strip search 
anymore - (ex-airhead) MO 

(il What would you sa{ i > 'me-' Certamhj not 

sgodbye' You are detmiteli. a very big smile Your kn Nanjf) 

Alan ft Carole - Waterskling, maybe I can do better at 
that, this summer, the hideout? - Rose 

ifcsM Thanks for all the hasseK I iust hope Trenton It nrajdj 
lor sou 7'i I" fence if m one piece' Love ya M- 

Agronomy Seniors - Thanks for making the past lour 
years really great! Good luck after graduation - Maribeth 

Leu - It'll nei-er be goodbye" - Lnie Tnsh 

To the Class of '86 - You made the last four years quite an 
experience. — Ham Bear 

Seighbors — Mr Rogers is unletting \ou' Your neighbor* in 

222 

Red Man - You'll always be my bestest buddy Your 
secrets are always ssfe with me! I love you lots — Dana 

To all my friends - You must continue to piny I )'2 w> no one 
forgets They are the best bond M. na 

Chris - I n jov your summer That polite, sweet, caring, 
good looking guy is waiting for you Good luck finding 
him. let me know when you do! 



Leslie - We missed you thfi post semester' Vince and I wish vou 
and Bill the best of luck with your new life together Keep In touch 
— Love. Vine* and Kartn 

To my boys at DVC - Look me up when you become MEN. 

To off Work 1st guys - This year has been my best. The hall has 
been a great, fun loving bunch of guys God blest all 

Nancy - Always rem e mber haircuts, grello. Sherman. 
popcorn, dancing, etc. I know this laa't goodbye for good 
but I know I'll always hat* you, - Bunny 

Daue ft Jennifer — Good fuck in fhe future with marriage, kids, 
everything And Dave, don't be told what to do all the time 

Karon - it's been a groat four years Can you believe ure 
ma de ft? Never forgot the great times we've hod. Thanks for 
all of your support and help. Til mlaa you. — Anita 

Itch Club — f hove only known you for one semester, but I am 
looking forward to many more All of you are special and I'm glad 
u>e met Big ChilP Someday, absolutely' — Your friend. Banana 

Kitty - Good luck In the Peace Corp* - Rose 

Joe ft Jen — You two are such a pair Never stop smihng - Brian 

Jim Enoch - Thanks for the laughs and dances. Don't lot 
anyone tell you you're not funny. See ya next year. - 
Constsntina 

David fMr Meelee) - Se gappo and se thelh. my ordimordiphee 
andras Don't leave' Don't leave' Here comes the boo boo face 
Bye. baby - Jennifer (Rag Monster) 

Kim — I'm glad I got to know you. Good luck In the future 
Take care and thanks for the B' In Poll Scl. - Love. T wink 

June. Anita, Cherte. Jeannie, Karen ft Leslie — Good luck in life 
and may the Princes of your dreams not turn into toads of reality 

Goodbye to all and lota of luck. It's been a fantastic four 
years together. Let's show the world who wo are - Alan 

Ed — You've been a great friend, even though you sometimes 
dnve me crazy 111 miss you a lot — Rote 

Mlkey B. - 88 and out the gate. - Wendy 

Goodbye Rippers. Speedshop Parties. NBI Import Nights. Road 
Trips. Clambakes. Stem. Tom. HELLO WENDY! 

Meg ft Lynctte - Lots of luck In whatever you do. Well 
miss you so please come visit. — Love, Michele ft Michele 

Michele - To my best friend Thanks for always being there 
You've been a terrific roomie Try and stay out of trouble this sum 
mer 1 - Love. Me 

Stevie (Refrigerator Face) - Johnny Mathis. aahh! Thanks 
for always being there when I needed you. I'm sorry. Boo! 

— Love, Jo 

Anita Karen. June. Chene ft Jeannie — You are a wonderful 
bunch of girls Have a great Bahama trip 111 see you all at gradua 
tion' - Love. Donna 

Lisa M. - Good luck In the future and have a wonderful 
summer. - Love. Scott 

Paulie ft Butch — Thanks for all the good times, and for putting up 
with me Without you two. this year would have been "the pits " - 
Beans 

Philosopher — Have a great summer and take it easy with 
the water guns, ok! Ill miss you! Bye! - Ewok 

Chris — You are a pretty dam dandy chum I mill miss you next 
year You had better come back to visit next year, you have a place 
to stay — Tom 

Bullwinkle - Have a good summer, please keep In touch. 
Remember to visit your Aunt s lot. It's been really great. 
See you soon. - Love, A friend 

Anito. Karen. June. Cherie ft Jeannie - You are cordially invited 
to stay al my house lor a weekend during the summer - Love. 
Donna 

Alexl - Good luck, you'll do fine! Don't worry so much, 
things will work out! I'm going to mis* you. — Love always, 
Lorl Ann 

Mr ■Hardware — No Pencil Necks! Remember Irv. Squatting 165. 
Fnendly's, NBI. Molson's. Good mghl Walt' Thanks for being 
around - Love Wendy 

Francis - I only have two thing* to say: CAN YOU RELATE 
and Parahna! — Anne 

Oug — You re all wet! Keep your hands to yourself or else — Mel 
ft Janice 

Yo. Roomie - Sup?! Hey. get a piece of the rock (before 
It's too late). Sure fire life insurance '86 — Guess who 

Bill S - Thanks for the greatest semester ever' Someday the other 
Lon writ come out You'd better watch out - Love ya. Lori L 

Ragu - Watch out for potatoes and Certs encounters. Joe 
Jack eon i* a good singer but Larry Mullen. Jr. la an excel 
lent drummer. — Nancy 

Serene, Matter. Original. Sorry. OK Incompetent. Immature. 

Cute. Little. Mother F You re all Bit 

Have a great summer — Fish B 

KD - Don't forget to write. - MT 

Dove Dalmer — Well, what do you think, was it me or wasn't it'-' 
Somethings we'll never know 

To M. aka (Pete) - Which Mike? Gonna get her In the bath- 
room? (Next semester for sure.) - JftM 

To the 5. 6. 7 IBustl players - Always remember 32. IBussI 34 
(Buss), 36. (Butt), eeh Drink' Many birthday's next semester Be 
prepared - MJM 

Hey M.H. - I'll still be teaching, bop* you'll still be learn- 
ing next semester. Many sleepless nights ahead. - Rad ft 
Random forever 

Maura ft Tern - Thanks for all your support. I never would have 
mode it without you! - Love ya. Beans 

Larry. Steve. Jo. Jen. Wendy. Bill ft Brian - All of you 
have a great summer and remember, don't work too hard. 

— Mark 

Judy - We have not yet begun to scope Cheers to all those frogs 

— Dana 

June - Are you a "honey?" Hope you get to Switzerland, it 
all sounds great. Maybe we will all have to get together 
with those L.A.'s. Good luck! - Anita 

Tracy - I love you' - Love. Michele 

DVC - These were the boat of times, these were the worst 
of times I'll never forget you. It hurts to leave, but that's 
what It's all about, I guess. - Jennifer 

Dear DVC — Thanks for a great education and for a fob No mat- 
ter what happens my education it a gift I wiU cany uifth me forever 

— A graduating senior 

Hey Chris - Why do they call It the hooter? 

To my Chem Buddies - We made it! I'm glad we all stuck together 
You 're a great bunch! Take care and keep in touch — Tern 

Ray ft Rich - Huh? What the? Who said you're weird, cer- 
tainly not me! Ill miss ya Rich! Roy. huh? - Luv. Tarry, 
who the? 

Joanne - Thanks for being a great friend 1 Don't fret. It's only 
Orgie Chem' Remember all the great music and good boote Take 
core' - Wendy 

ToScottZ - The big "W~ will make you a fortune one day. 
manufacturing log* for firewood. Maybe I can find you a 
steter! — Theresa 

Scott. Doug. Sue. Rote. Judy. Leslie R . Karen. John A John — 
Parties were never meant to last, thank God college wasn't either 

— Ed 

Optimist Prime ft Hound - Remember the Isau? You guys 
am great and deserve the best! Good luck lo the future - 
Lo ve. Starscream 



Carole - Goodbye ft no good because It's not goodbye I hope we 
keep going stronger than ever I really love you — Mr Teddy 

To all of the OH Family - You've helped me through and 
this Is to you - THANKS and good luck! - Anita 

Jeannie Meyer - Besides a tuccettful flower shop, what other 
kind would you or anyone want? Goodbye and good luck — Ed 

Teddy - It's boon a super year with many mora to com*. 
Keep amllin' and don't forgot I'm still with ya. - Leva ya 
lot*. Me 

Rose. Ed ft Jamie - Be tuccettful In all you do at graduates 
Thanks for the laughs at Ram Paget and for keeping me busy. — 
Bill 

Mark - Fish bitch patrol! Have fun and take some great 
picture* In Florida, but don't epear anything. - Love, Jo 

Potholes — Keep me up all night 

Jim - I love youl - Goober 

Sue — A Day is all over and now it's time to say goodbye Yes. 
Bahama bound - Love. Scott 

Love so much to so many, especially: Alex. Annette, 
David, Marg. Shawn, Monkey*, Maryann. Dr. P.. Dan, 
Todd, Dawn. Kitty, John, Steve. Pep - Thanks. Jen 

Terry — f hate your guts f hope you die when I graduate That can 
be your present to me Gel lost! — Love, Nancy 

To the RA's on Work 2nd - Arc you still alive? We never 
se* youl What a Job. 

Wendy — Remember the good times 171 miss you - Rose 

Al — Thanks for being my escort and thanks for the lovely 
corsage. You're a sweet guy. Have a great summer! - Love 
ya. Donna 

Alan. Carole, Bunny. Buffy. Targhee. Johnny. Ragu - Where's 
my pineapple'' 

Bill — Now that Philosophy Is over I just have one ques- 
tion: What la the meaning of life? Have a good summer. — 
Met 

Carolyn - / love your blowfish and the way you hold things in 
your note, etc You are a true inspiration to me - Tom 

Sharon, Lisa. Steve ft Sharon — Great sophomore year. 
Have a blast over the summer. Maybe well hit the beach. 
- Constsntina 

To the Hot Ones on Bamess 2nd (DCMA) - See yas over the 
summer and next year It's beer great! - Love yas B 

Blrdy - Thanks, you arc a great person. Good luck. Watch 
out because I owe you one. Your birthday. — Love. Scott 

June. Cherie. Jeannie. Kartn ft Donna - The times spent have 
been very dear I will always remember you with a smile Hope to 
see you later - CSL 

Mike H. - I'm glad you aaked me to live at the house. 
Thanks for "the flying lesson" last year. Juat think, you're 
finally done at DVC Love. Maribeth 

Terri - It's hard to sum-r- >nze four great years Thanks for being a 
great friend and room»»ite Lets keep in touch I love you' - 
Your roomie 

O.H. C lass of oo - You were the best! I don't know what 
we'll do without youl Good luck. - An O.H. '87 

John L - You ie a great a'jy and a great sports editor Good luck 
almoys - Love. Rosemaiy 

Hey, Bob V. - Can you see who's In that room? My bike 
from the bush In back of Barnes* says hi! - JftM 

Dona - No may will I say goodbye There s lots of frogs for us this 
summer Get out of my brain miles away — Love ya. Judy 

Lassie Megan - Here's to the luck of the Irish and all the 
good times. Come back and get poshed with us sometime. 
With love. Hotl 

Dana ft Judy (Baby ft Hoto) — The year went quickly but a lot 
has happened, for the better or worse you II alu>ays be my college 
friends for life 

Hey Crayons! — Thanks for all the colorful memories! - 
Love you all. Green 

Berk 2nd is the place to be next semester Party party, party Right 
Trish? - MJM 

ABC - Thanks lor being such a great friend. Here's look- 
ing st the summer and next year! - Lots of love, MAF 

Beans - Thanks for being such a great roommate Remember all 
the good times Schoolbox all nighters. sex pit. Bahamas, dinner 
dances, etc Keep in touch — Tern 

floral Society Officers - Good luck this coming term. 
you'll need it. Also, good luck with the next A-Day. 

Mazzola and Theresa - Good luck with each other Hey John, 
please don t let tier run your whole life 

Brad - "Wendy, do you want a French fry?" 

Mike B Thane. Wendy. Brad. Doug. Jackie. Julie Jean. Chuck. 
Paul. Mike S . Myrt - The best of the commuters' 

Chris - You're a great Mom. but If you keep saying that 
word we will all line up and give you hug*. Visit me! - 
Guess who 

Kathy R — One word will suffice. "Thanks'" (Well maybe a few 
more. "Thanks for everything!") - Your roomie 

Chris Turner — Bumpy freshman road. Don't worry, next 
year is coming. Take care over the summer. I'll miss you. 
- With love. Constsntina 

To the Hideout Gang — On August 19th or the nearest weekend 
to such date, let's do it ogam This time we will learn to waterski 
and fall down 

— Io Maribeth G - I'm aure your apartment will be cleaner 
at Penn Stale than here, but who will you talk to?? Call me 
next yearf - Theresa 

To the Fruit Loop Troop - Why don't you get together wrth the 
Honey Nut Cheerios Group and be the FruH Loop Honey Nut 
Troop' 

Dr. Hofaa es a ft Family - Thanks for all your help In Novel- 
ties. We couldn't have done without you. - Rosemary 

P J ft Juhe — Thanks for the fish It's been really fun dieting with 
you August 9th. Baltimore or BUST Take care - K, K A J 

Kathy Mac - Smllel Sorry, no picture. Thank* for being a 
super RA and friend. It won't be the same without you. - 
Love, Carole 

Diane — "If a man over 65 is blind in both eyes and walks with a 
slight limp what would his tax deduction be?" — Wendy 

Dawn - Well this Is it! Tim* to say goodbye to the best 
friend anyone could ever have! You better visit me! — Love 
ya, Cindy 

Dawn - What can t say' It's been a hectic year but a fun one 1 

Always remember aU the crazy times! Remember to 

hardf - Cindy 

Kathy. Esther Twlnk ft Dawn - Thanks for all the groat 
tlmesl You guys at* groat! Til mlaa ya lots ft Iota! - Cindy 

Jen - FftM is over 1 You are a great person and friend! Best of luck 
in uihoteyer you do' - Cindy D 

Bruce. Glen ft Karon M. - Remember all the great tlmesl 
I'll miss you guys! Keep In touch! Remember: parties In my 
room next year! - Love. Cindy 

Connie - Sorry the end of this year did not work out I hope next 
year will be better - Love ya, Chrit 

Connie - Have a good summer and a groat time la Greece. 
- Chris 

Reds. Kenny. Monty. Joe. Steve. Laura Bum. Gortt - Had a 
great year Hope you guys have a great summer - Chang Lou 

Killer - Had a fun time this year, you taught as* a lot. 
Hop* to have snore fun wrth you in the future — Good 



THE 

RAM PAGES 

VOL. 21 
1986-1987 






EDfitai&ffls® Wlfltssf ©sinks®® 



Vol. XXI. No. 1 

Monday, September 8, 1986 



Highlights: 

See the Changes . . . 
Sports: Summer Recap 




NOTICE; The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



Changes Greet DVC Students 




Dr. Feldstein 
to Retire 

excerpted from "The Daily Intelligencer" 

Dr. Joshua Feldstein, who for 47 years 
has made Delaware Valley College his 
home and life's work, has announced 
that he will retire from the presidency at 
the end of his current term. 

Dr. Feldstein made this announce- 
ment during a press conference held in 
his office. He had informed the Board of 
Trustees at an executive committee 
meeting. 

The President will officially step down 
June 30. 1987, at the conclusion of his 
third four-year term. 

In a memo written to staff and stu- 
dents. Dr. Feldstein said he made the 
decision when he celebrated his 65th 



birthday this past April. When asked 
what prompted the decision, he replied, 
"I thought it was just time to step down. 
(The decision] had to be made. 1 believe 
one has to know when to retire ..." 

Dr. Feldstein graduated from the col- 
lege, then the National Farm School, in 
1939. He was an Assistant Instructor in 
1942, became a Professor of horticulture 
in 1965, Department Chairman of horti- 
culture in 1966, Dean in 1973 and finally 
President on July 15. 1975. succeeding 
Dr. James Work. 

Many of Dr. Feldstein's accomplish- 
ments at DVC have become an integral 
part of life on campus, things we stu- 
dents probably could not imagine doing 
without. During this presidency, the 
James Work Memorial Stadium was built 
(in 1978). our three million dollar Stu- 
dent Center was completed in 1983 and 
the Sydney J. Markovitz Equine Facility 
opened in 1984. 

After retiring. Dr. and Mrs. Feldstein 
plan to remain in this area; Dr. Feldstein 
will likely teach part-time. He hopes to 
remain on the Board of Trustees and 
"help the new president raise money." 
He emphasized, "I will continue to be an 
associate of this institution, because it's 
been my life's work and always been my 
home." 

A nationwide search for our next pres- 
ident by our trustees, faculty, alumnus 
and a Student Government representa- 
tive, is said to have begun two weeks 
ago. 



Out From Under 
The Editors' Desk: 

Well, we hope that everyone has com- 
fortably settled into the DVC lifestyle, a 
new experience for you freshmen and 
transfer students and old hat for the rest 
of us. Now, part of this college life is 
grabbing a copy of your very own news- 
paper every Friday to catch up on the 
latest facts, figures and opinions pertain- 
ing to sports and almost everything else 
you might want to know about (or any- 
thing our contributors might want to 
write about)! But we cannot say anything 
without your support. 

The Ram Pages staff works hard to get 
each week's issue out to you in a con- 
cise, readable form — reporting, follow- 
ing Aggies teams cross country, writing 
and photographing, and bringing it to- 
gether almost every Monday evening, 
only to begin again with new ideas and 
news to seek out by the next deadline. 

So help us out. Anything you want to 
say (within, of course, the limits of Ram 
Pages editorial policy) that you think the 
campus should know, write it up and 
send it to us via P.O. Box 988 or any 
staff member you know. As our title 
says, we are the student newspaper. 

Keep reading, 
Co-Editors in Chief 
John D. Ebert 
Bill Rein 



Personals 

Yes! We have personals! If you've got 
something to say to someone, print it in 
Ram Pages. If something juicy happened 
to a friend this weekend, let the whole 
campus know. Just keep it clean and 
leave out those last names! 

1. Submit the signed personal to Box 
988. 

2. Names can be kept confidential if 
requested . 

3. Numbers will be assigned to confiden- 
tial personals and printed in the paper. 

4. To respond, write your response to 
the number and the response will be 
forwarded to that person. 

5. Keep it printable! 




Announcement: 

THE HUNGER PROJECT 

Hunger is a persistent worldwide prob- 
lem, resulting in the deaths of 13 to 18 
million people per year. You have the 
ability to make a difference. 

On Wednesday, September 10. 7:30 
p.m. in the Student Center, Second 
floor Coffeehouse, there will be a briefing 
on hunger. Find out the truth about this 
devastating world problem and what you 
can do to help solve it. 



DR. BLACKMON 
HAS RETIRED 



Dr. Clinton R. Blackmon, professor of 
Plant Science, former Dean and nation- 
ally-known plant breeder, retired in June 
from the staff of the college after 30 years 
of teaching. 

Dr. Blackmon served as Chairman of 
the departments of Agronomy, Horticul- 
ture and Ornamental Horticulture before 
becoming Chairman of the Plant Science 
Division and Dean of the college in 
1975. He was a leader in the develop- 
ment of the college from a small agricul- 
tural school to a nationally-recognized in- 
stitution. He served in key positions in 
teaching providing for educational lead- 
ership, strengthening of the scientific 
programs and the advising and encour- 
aging of students to become professional 
leaders. 

More than 10.000 students attended 
his classes during 40 years of teaching at 
DVC. the University of Massachusetts 
and the University of Maine. From the 
beginning. Dr. Blackmon championed 
the cause of higher education and urged 
students to go as far as their capacities 
would allow. Even in the early days 
before the college was accredited by the 
Middle States Association, he was in- 
strumental in getting Delaware Valley 
College graduates accepted into top 
graduate schools. 

As Dean, Dr. Blackmon was very ac- 
tive in promoting those things that devel- 
op great institutions, such as outstanding 
faculty, excellent teaching facilities, strong 
motivation and a sense of pride in ac- 
complishments. He was most supportive 
of all programs which permitted the 
faculty to carry out their mission of supe- 
rior teaching and training of students. 
Laboratory equipment and supplies be- 
came a priority. Facilities were improved 
where necessary and new courses added 
to keep up with modern technology. 
New computer courses were developed 
to keep up with the needs of business 
and agriculture. 

As a member of the Northeastern 
Higher Education Committee for the 
U.S. DA., Dr. Blackmon made a survey 
of computer training in colleges of agri- 
culture and found a great need for such 
training since agricultural business, the 
Agricultural Extension Service and farm- 
ers were poised for dramatic increased 
usage of this technology. Under his lead- 
ership DVC became the first agricultural 
college in the nation to require a com- 
puter course for all agricultural majors. 



About Editorial Policy 

Ram Pages has specific rules and 
guidelines we must follow regarding edi- 
torials received by students, faculty and 
staff to be printed in the newspaper. This 
is for your use — save it for when you 
have an editorial to submit. Use it as a 
guide to writing acceptable editorials. 

Ram Pages Editorial Policy 

1. Ram Pages reserves the right to 
make any editorial changes in all 
material submitted for publication. 

2. Only signed material will be con- 
sidered for publication. Signatures 
will be withheld upon request. 

3. Any material which isA:onsidered by 
the student editor(s) or faculty advisor 
to be potentially libelous will be inves- 
tigated and documented before con- 
sideration for publication. 

4. The writers of material in question 
must certify sincerity of purpose and 
correctness of facts to the best of their 
knowledge. 

5. The person (s) named or implied in 
the controversial material shall be in- 
formed of any article before publica- 
tion and shall be given the opportuni- 
ty to respond. 

Thank You, 
Co-Editors in Chief 
John D. Ebert 
Bill Rein 





* This Week on 
Campus 

by Jan Bethn 

FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 9 



SATURDAY 

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SPORTS WRAP-UP 



LITZKE'S 
SPORTS' BRIEFS 

Summer Re- Cap 



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by John Litzke 

• USFL vs. NFL: USFL battled the NFL 
in a much publicized court case. USFL 
charged the NFL with monopolizing 
the business of professional football, 
denying the USFL TV rights in the 
USFL's attempt to switch to the fall, 
and with trying to put the USFL out of 
business. The charges were found to 
be frivolous and the USFL was award- 
ed the ridiculous sum of $1. (Actually 
$3 because the original total of $1 was 
multiplied by 3.) Thus, the USFL is 
now the ex- USFL. 

• Philadelphia 76ers go wheeling and 
dealing with their *1 draft pick, and a 
real surprise, their indomitable center 
as well, as the Sixers went for youth 
when they acquired forward-center Cliff 
Robinson and center Jeff Ruland from 
Washington for Moses Malone and 
second-year forward Terry Cateledge. 

• Then, in the same breath, they traded 
their first pick in the draft to the Cleve- 
land Cavaliers for forward Roy Hinson. 
These transactions received mixed 
opinions amongst the Philadelphia 
faithful. Here are some that I've heard 
— PROS: Gained speed and youth, 
gained experience at forward, Wash- 
ington set a franchise record for season 
ticket sales. CONS: Lost rebounding, 
lost intimidation or psychological edge, 
lost a raw talent. Sixers season ticket 
sales are way down. 



• I think the combination the Sixers has 
will work but while the Sixers didn't get 
any taller, the rest of the East did with 
New York acquiring Kenny "Sky" 
Walker to go along with Ewing and 
Cartwright and the Malone-Manute 
connection in the nation's capital 
should make the East very interesting. 

• The Celtics suffered the unfortunate 
loss of first round pick Len Bias as he 
died suddenly and shockingly after us- 
ing the deadly drug "crack." Larry Bird 
says the Celtics WILL repeat. 

• The Goodwill Games took place this 
summer in that favorite vacation spot 
of the universe, Moscow, Russia. In a 
sort of "tune-up" for the 1988 Olympic 
Games, the Russians dominated and 
captured more medals than anyone 
ever has in history. 

• The New York Mets. 1 think that's all I 
have to say. 

• Multi-Cy Young Award winner Steve 
Carlton is released by the Phillies and 
San Francisco and has seemed to have 
found a niche in Chicago with the 
White Sox. He also found his voice, 
for as soon as Philadelphia dropped 
him and Steve said he'd retire, he 
dropped the bomb on everybody and 
spoke, honestly. So, after showing the 
United States how well he can talk, he 
exclaimed, in a quite nervous and 
spastic delivery, "1 can still pitch in this 
league." 

• Tennis star John "I won't be violent be- 
cause now I have a son" McEnroe re- 
turns to the pro-circuit after a six- month 
layoff. The layoff made Papa John a 
bit rusty. 

• As a result of the deaths of Len Bias 
and Cleveland Browns defensive back 
Don Rogers, a nationwide drug testing 
programs are being installed at both 
the college and pro levels. The pro 
players opinions are mixed. They think 
they're being infringed upon or their 
rights are being violated, but if you've 
got nothing to hide, why not take it? 

• Right here on the campus of DVC is 
the flagship of a anti-drug campaign 
called FAD. (Footballers Against 
Drugs) and our own Coach Wilson is 
its nationwide coordinator. 

(See "They're Out To Get You" 
in next week's Ram Pages.) 



Exclusive!! 

Coming Next Week 

• F.A.D. Footballers Against Drugs: 
"They're out to get you!" 

• Soccer preview plus coverage of Tren- 
ton Tournament. 

• Tired of being called "Aggies?" Sign 
petition in dining hall to change nick- 
name to "Rams." 

• Field hockey preview and cross coun- 
try preview by reporter Rob Hipszer. 

• Get ready for "Athlete of the Week" 
profile and Sports Trivia, where a tasty 
prize could be won. 

• Along with Rob Hipszer reporting on 
cross country, welcome Brett Hart 
(soccer reporter), Kathleen McGough 
(equestrian reporter) and Brian Tag- 
gart (wrestling reporter) to the Ram 
Pages sports staff. 

ALL THIS. PLUS MUCH MORE IN 

RAM PAGES 

SO PICK UP YOUR COPY! 



• SUPERSTARS • 

Superstars will be held Sunday, Sep- 
tember 14. There are six members on a 
team, three guys and three girls, and the 
cost is two dollars per person. Each team 
member will receive a Superstars t-shirt 
and there are cash prizes for the top five 
teams. 

Sign up with your RA, or if you're a 
commuter, sign up at the Residence Life 
Office on the second floor of the Student 
Center. 

All money must be paid in full when 
you sign up. 

Events include: Mattress Race, Bal- 
loon Race, Dizzy Bat Race, Relay Race, 
Wheel Barrel Race, Flipper Race, Sack 
Race and Obstacle Course. 



AGGIES '86: 

O-Line a Concern; 
D is Dynamite! 

by John Litzke 

The 1986 edition of the DVC Aggies 
football team is taking shape. 

The '86 team, with over 50 freshman 
out of the 120 members, is somewhat 
like a giant, gridiron jigsaw puzzle and 
many of the pieces have yet to be fitted 
in place. 

Head coach Al Wilson begins his 11th 
season at the helm with a career record 
of 48-47 and looking to add about 9 or 
10 more wins onto that. Joining the DVC 
staff are three new coaches, one of whom 
we all know, Bruce Sweda, the outstand- 
ing outside linebacker who graduated 
from DVC this past spring, has been 
given the job of linebacker coach and 
Coach Wilson is delighted to have Bruce 
on the staff. "Bruce has done a good job 
for us during camp and he works well 
with the players," commented Coach 
Wilson. Joining Bruce in their first season 
as coaches are E.J. Smith, who will be 
working with the defensive backs and 
Steve Hohenstein has the job of rebuild- 
ing the offensive line. 

With the loss of such major pieces of 
the jigsaw puzzle as John Mazzola. Eric 
Protsko and Craig Breneman. some 
pretty big shoes are going to have to be 
filled. It is the job of Coach Hohenstein 
to find the right personnel for the open 
jobs on the line, and it is my opinion that 
he has done just that. 

The '85 offensive line was hindered for 
much of the season with injuries and we 
saw a lot of new faces and some old ones 
in new positions. But this season, we're 
hoping for steady, consistent, hard work 
from Dave "Chief" Hannichick and Jesse 
Perkins at tackle, Joe Harby and Brian 
Clapp at guard and Brandt Nolan at cen- 
ter to anchor the whole crew. From the 
practices I've seen, it looks like the O-line 
is progressing very nicely. 




An Endless Summer 

Keep the thoughts of summer 

aliue in your mind with 

fresh flower bouquets. Send 

someone you care about a 

"Thinking of You Bouquet. " 

A 20% discount is offered to 

all students and faculty who 

show proper ID. Bouquets 

are available at both our 

Floral Shop locations: 



Lasker Hall 

Mon.-Fri. 8:30-4:00 

or Greenhouse Complex 

Mon 1:30-4:00 
Tues 8:30-11:00 

11:30-2:30 
Wed 9:00-11:00 
(open for orders) 

11:30-12:00 
Thurs. 11:30-6:00 
Fit 11:30-100 
230-6:00 



yjm 



WS 



Special orders can be made 
by calling Ext. 2275. 



"All the quarterbacks had a good 
camp," commented Coach Wilson. In- 
deed, the Aggies have a very fine group 
of quarterbacks this season led by senior 
and starter of last year, Walt Kobryznski 
out of C.B. West High School here in 
Doylestown. His totals for last season 
had Walt throwing 155 times with 55 
completions for 729 yards and eight 
touchdowns. But breathing down Walt's 
back for the starting job are last year's 
back-ups Andy Hower, Rod Kwaitkowski 
and Clay Butterworth as well as new- 
comers Bob Stamm out of Methacton 
and Doug Perry out of Lansdale Catho- 
lic. 1 have a feeling the quarterback deci- 
sion could go down to the final week of 
the pre- season. 



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The preseason strong points of the 
'86 DVC team would have to be the run- 
ning game and the defense 

Returning to the Aggie backfield is last 
year's leading rusher. Jim Wilson, who 
gained 1.143 yards on 275 carries. Jim 
has worked hard in the off-season and 
has trimmed down to 180 lbs. (15 lbs 
less than last season) and looks like a 
powder keg just waiting for a spark. In 
front of Wilson is workhorse fullback Joe 
Bello who rushed for 454 yards on 1 17 
carries and four touchdowns and wing- 
back Sean Cliver will contribute as well 
with his great speed. 

The '86 Defensive Corp is packed with 
talent and should make opposing offenses 
lose a lot of sleep. Anchoring the defense 
is senior middle linebacker Jim Hannon. 
who has fully recovered from a season 
ending knee injury and is ready to hit. 
Joining Hannon on the linebacking corp 
are seniors Greg Currie and Vince Bede 
sem With the loss of Bob Charette at 
nose tackle you might think the D-line 
would be a bit weak, but no way An- 
choring down the trenches is senior de- 
fensive end Chuck Heiber and senior de- 
fensive tackle Tom Voell with help from 
Seamus McGlone at the other end and 
Mike Malec at tackle. 

Heading the secondary is senior cor 
nerback Steve Clark along with Mike 
Heisy and Rich Simononis. 

A crucial part of the game is the kick- 
ing game and those duties will be up to 
punter-kicker, John Sukeena who did a 
fine job last season with help from new- 
comer John Ford from Kutztown H.S. in 
Kutztown, PA. 

DVC will be looking to better their '85 
record of 6-4. To do that they'll have to 
get by tough MAC rivals such as Widener. 
Gettysburg. Lycoming and Juniata, who 
has 17 starters returning. 

The Aggies open their '86 "champion- 
ship campaign" on Saturday, September 
13 with the Bullets of Gettysburg (Cen- 
tennial League Champions in '85) at 
Gettysburg at 1:30 p.m. Let's get set for 
yet another season of exciting Aggie 
football. 






DMaNRfaoats^DllIkssf ©ssffiks®© 



Vol. XXI. No. 2 

Friday, September 12. 1986 




NOTKT Thf opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



All the news 
that fits, 
we print. " 




Dr. Peter J. Glick, Jr.: 
A Sad Passing 

It is still the beginning of another term, 
a time when college students are prob- 
ably most eager and excited; we look for- 
ward to reuniting with our old friends, 
meeting new instructors and the fresh- 
ness of a new class roster. Here at DVC 
we suddenly find ourselves stunned and 
saddened with the death of long-time 
teacher, administrator and friend, Dr. 
Peter J. GHck, Jr. He was 64. 

m a memorandum to administration, 
faculty, staff and students, college presi- 
dent Dr. Joshua Feldstein said, "It is with 
utmost sadness and great personal loss 
that I must advise you of the sudden and 
untimely passing of Dr. Peter Glick on 
Thursday, September 4, 1986." Res- 
pected by both the administration and 



the student body — an achievement in 
itself — Dr. Glick was devoted to the 
teaching profession and to the students 
of DVC as a whole. Dr. Feldstein aptly 
stated, "He was a mainstay of the col- 
lege. He will be a very, very difficult per- 
son to replace." 

A graduate of Princeton University 
and Trenton State College, Dr. Glick 
came to DVC in 1948 to teach as assis- 
tant professor of political science. He 
later earned his doctorate in education 
from Rutgers University, and became 
chairman of the former General Studies 
Division. In 1983, Dr. Glick became 
chairman of the newly formed Liberal 
Arts Department, a position he has held 
henceforth. For all those 38 years almost 
every DVC student has known Dr. Glick 
as their political science professor; he 
also had been professor of foreign affairs. 
American history and speech. 

Dr. Glick had served in a variety of 
other positions at the college, including 
Director of Placement, Director of Ath- 
letics and head football coach. He was 
also chairman of our Middle States Eval- 
uation Coordinating Committee and ad- 
visor to Student Government. Outside 
the college. Dr. Glick has been noted for 
his regular political column in The Daily 
Intelligencer. 

Dr. Feldstein is "absolutely shocked 
and very heartbroken" by the death of 
Dr. Glick, "a great personal friend of 
mine." Indeed, DVC has lost part of itself. 



DVC Ag Marketing Co-op 
Begins Anew 

by Margaret Freeman 

AGRICULTURAL MARKETING AS- 
SOCIATES has announced the election 
of its new president, Mr. Joseph Ryan. 
Mr. Ryan is a junior Agribusiness major 
here at DVC and a resident of Hershey, 
Pa. Agricultural Marketing Associates is 
an informal cooperative specializing in 
the marketing of agricultural products 
owned by stockholders and managed by 
members of the Agricultural Sales and 
Marketing course. 

This cooperative provides a complete 
approach to an entire business organiza- 
tional structure and operations. In addi- 
tion, members identify sources of mar- 
keting information and interpret that data 
as a basis for marketing decisions. Func- 
tions such as buying, selling, transporting 
and financing in the ag field comprise 
some of the course topics. 

Speaking of their near-term objectives, 
Mr. Ryan said: "Agricultural Marketing 
Associates will be involved in another 
sales event this year. Last year's Agricul- 
tural Sales and Marketing class, taught 
by Dr. John Avery, kicked off the forma- 
tion of this cooperative. We are presently 
searching for a top grade product. My 
associates are quite capable and enthusi- 
astic with the challenge brought before 
them. We will let you know more about 
our campaign in future news releases." 

The thrust of the upcoming promo- 
tional activity will occur shortly. Cur- 
rently, the research and development 
and marketing divisions are conducting 
analyses. 



If Miii T in H alii % mi * i^tiMiii 1 

Flowers, Flowers, Flowers! 

Treat your buddy 

Treat your friend 

to a bouquet of flowers 

yes, that's the trend!! 

A bouquet of flowers really brightens 
up a person's day, so visit one of our 
floral locations: 

One in Lasker Hall open 

Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. -4 p.m. 

and one in the Greenhouse 

Complex, hours posted. 

Call In orders at extension 2275. 



Procedures for 
Room Reservations 

STUDENT CENTER 

Any student, faculty member or staff 
member who would like to reserve a 
room in the Student Center should fol- 
low the procedure listed below: 

1 . Come to the Dean of Students office 
(second floor, Student Center) or call 
extension 2216, and present your re- 
quest to Mrs. Nelson. If the room you 
request" is available, your reservation 
will be logged in the master schedule. 
At this time any special requests for 
equipment, set up, food, etc. should 
be noted. 

2. Reservations should be made at least 
one week prior to any scheduled 
activity. 

Robert J. Tasker 
Dean of Students 



PLANNING: GET OFF 
TO A GOOD START 

If you have a negative feeling about 
planning, it might be a kind of reaction 
against parents, teachers or someone 
else who tried to impose their structure 
upon you. If this is the case, you need to 
examine those feelings and perhaps ar- 
rive at your own decisions about how to 
plan your life. It may help to discuss these 
reactions with someone. Of course, you 
can't have everything. If you opt to put 
some order into your life in order to ac- 
complish certain academic goals, you 
must give up some of your freedom to 
do whatever feels good at whatever time. 
In a sense it is a question of values and 
what is most important to you. If you 
want to do some planning in order to 
improve your study habits, then you have 
taken the first big step. You have the 
motivation to change. 

Students who are successful academi- 
cally are usually well organized. If they 
don't use a formal, written-out schedule, 
they usually have a pretty clear idea of 
when they plan to do what. Because of 
this organization these students tend to 
use time efficiently. 

Semester-long planning: You need 
a long-term view of what you want to ac- 
complish. A semester-long calendar with 
notations of when papers are due and 
tests are scheduled will help you in the 
general management of the semester. 

Weekly scheduling: The key to tak- 
ing and keeping control of your time is 
having some kind of regular scheduling 
mechanisms. For many people a weekly 
schedule with all time commitments on it 
works best. It is particularly important to 
write out a schedule if you are attempting 

Audubon Society 
to Meet at DVC 

The Bucks County Audubon Society 
has been meeting on the DVC campus 
since its inception in the summer of 
1969. The first meeting was held in the 
science building and called to order by 
Dr. John Mertz, Bucks County Audu- 
bon's first president, now Academic 
Dean of DVC. 

At that time Bucks County Audubon 
had only about 100 members. Now, it 
has a membership of 1,600, making it 
the largest non-profit environmental 
group in Bucks County. The Audubon 
Society's main purposes are conserving 
wildlife, promoting awareness of our en- 
vironmental problems, educating the 
public about the interdependence of 
humans and their environment and fur- 
thering the wise use of land and water. 
One of the ways they promote these 
goals is their monthly programs. Various 
naturalists, environmentalists and scien- 
tists are invited to DVC to speak on a 
wide range of topics, from the flora and 
fauna of Bucks County to the solid waste 
problem. These meetings are open to the 
public and held on the first Tuesday 
evening of each month at 8 p.m. in 
Mandell Hall. Students are encouraged 
to attend, and there is no admission 
charge. 



to improve your time management tech- 
niques. There are several things to keep 
in mind in constructing a schedule. 

Be realistic. Allow yourself adequate 
time for sleep, exercise, recreation and 
socializing. People who try to spend 
every waking moment studying usually 
wind up with a zero efficiency level. You 
must have a balance in your daily activi- 
ties. Leaving out crucial needs like sleep, 
recreation and social time tends to de- 
crease the efficiency of your study time. 
The key here is to use the time that you 
normally waste. There are 168 hours in 
each week. If we assume that you sleep 
eight hours per dav. spend 15 hours per 
week in class and spend three hours per 
day eating, that leaves you with 76 hours 
to use for study, r ecreation, socializing 
and work. If you study two hours per 
week for every hour you are in class that 
leaves you with 46 hours to use for recre- 
ation, socializing, etc. Of course, every- 
one's schedule doesn't work out this 
simply, but the illustration shows that if 
time is organized, there is plenty of it. 

The way that you design your weekly 
schedule is important. Generally speak- 
ing, it is better to arrange study time with 
short breaks periodically. Also, you 
should take advantage of your natural 
cycles. If you concentrate well in the late 
afternoon, then schedule study time 
there. If you don't, then schedule recre- 
ation or something else. Don't, however, 
give in to the urge to stay up into the wee 
hours because it is so quiet and peaceful. 
If you fall into this habit, there is a great 
probability that you will be tempted to 
sleep through morning classes. 

As a final note keep this thought in 
mind: plan your work, then work your 
plan. 



This Week on 
Campus 

by Judy Henry 

FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 12 

97 days left 'ti Finals 
10 d»v» left *tf Outtow 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER U 

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SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER M 

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CoBege Employee! Pfcrie 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 

Freahnao! -Ia« Becrt&tai Get out 
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ACROSS 

1 Where one might 
study Andy Warhol's 
works (3 wds.) 

12 Enrollment into 
college 

14 "Calculus Made Sim- 
ple," e.g. (2 wds.) 

16 Evaluate 

17 Extremely small 

18 Follows a recipe 
direction 

19 Belonging to Mr. 
Pacino 

22 Of land measure 

23 Meets a poker bet 

24 Gay (WW II 

plane) 

26 Capri, e.g. 

27 Belonging to Mayor 
Koch 

28 Irritate or 
embitter 

30 Train for a boxing 
match 

31 — — and the 
Belmonts 

32 Processions 

35 Diet supplement 
(abbr.) 

38 Scottish historian 
and philosopher 

39 College in Green- 
ville, Pa. 

40 The Venerable 



©Edward Julius 

41 "...not with 

but a whimper." 

43 Return on invest- 
ment (abbr.) 

44 Pondered 

45 Belonging to Mr. 
Starr 

47 Part of the classi- 
fieds (2 wds.) 

48 Possible place to 
study abroad (2 wds) 

52 Small school in Can- 
ton, Ohio (2 wds.) 

53 Orson Welles film 
classic (2 wds.) 

DOWN 



1 Those who are duped 

2 "Do unto ..." 

3 Fourth estate 

4 Goals 

5 Well-known record 
label 

6 Well-known king 

7 151 to Caesar 

8 Prefix meaning milk 

9 Confused (2 wds.) 

10 husky 

11 Most immediate 

12 Like a sailboat 

13 Cash register key 
(2 wds.) 

14 En (as a whole) 

15 Auto racing son of 
Richard Petty 



19 Political disorder 

20 dt. (footnote 

abbreviation) 

21 Traveled on a 
Flexible Flyer 

24 Glorify 

25 Prospero's servant 
in "The Tempest" 

28 Well-known govern- 
ment agency 

29 American league 
team (abbr.) 

30 Fictional hypnotist 

32 Style exemplified 
by Picasso 

33 "She's ..." 

(from "Flashdance") 

34 Be unwell 

35 Visible trace 

36 Think 

37 Woman's under- 
garment 

38 Commit kiri 

40 — burner 

42 "...for if I 

away ..." 
44 Actress Gibbs 

46 African antelope 

47 Well-known TV band- 
leader 

49 Pi nee 

(eyeglass type) 

50 1968 film, " 

Station Zebra" 

51 1965 film, " 

Ryan's Express" 



CLUB NEWS 

Pi Alpha Xi Gets Set 

for Second Season 

The first meeting of Pi Alpha Xi, the 
Ornamental Horticulture Honor Society, 
was held on Thursday, September 4, at 
4:10 p.m. in Greenhouse IV. There are 
presently only six members of our club: 
Ed Adams, Brad Bewley, Deborah Pom- 
roy, Paul Quattrocchi, Bill Rein and 
Nina. 

Induction: The tentative date of Octo- 
ber 1 was set for the induction ceremony. 
We hope to get David Lou, of Rolling 
Greens Interiorscaping, Washington, 
D.C., to be our guest speaker. The sec- 
ond floor Coffeehouse will be reserved, if 
possible. 

The following members were given 
their respective responsibilities by default 
— only five people were present at this 
first meeting — President: Paul Quattroc- 
chi; Vice President: Deborah Pomroy; 
Secretary: Bill Rein; Treasurer: Ed 
Adams; I.C.C. Reps.: (Paul) and one 
vacant position; A-Day Reps.: two va- 
cant positions. 

Vacant positions will be filled upon in- 
duction of new members. Honorary 
memberships will be discussed. 

Dues: $10 are required of all second- 
year members. Please try to have all 
monies in before the induction ceremony 
is held. 

Homecoming plans have been re- 
viewed. We have a queen nominee and 
car available for decorating. 



Apparently we are broke! As soon as 
we get new members, this issue will be 
addressed. 

Don't miss the Pizza Party to be hosted 
by Flowertime, Inc., October 14! 

Cycling Club 
Goes Along for the Ride 

The Cycling Club took its first ride of 
the season along the back roads of Bucks 
County. We rode through the towns of 
Carversville and Lumberville on our 
scenic route to the Delaware River. Our 
trip came to thirty miles, which was 
pedaled by our advisor Mr. Lawrence 
and four club members. Check the orange 
board for local or long distance rides, or 
get in touch with Ann Whitesell at P.O. 
Box 785 or John Boyd at P.O. Box 807. 
We welcome anyone interested in cycling. 

Honor Brush 

Equestrians 
See Some Changes 

The Equestrian Team held its first 
meeting last Thursday, September 4. It 
was announced that instead of riding at 
Milestone Farm, as members have done 
in the past, lessons will be given at Step- 
ping Stone Farm, the team's new loca- 
tion. Margaret Black was introduced as 
the team's new coach and will be instruct- 
ing approximately 62 riders ranging from 
beginner to advanced levels of experi- 
ence. Lessons will being on Monday, 
September 15, and the team's first show 
will be on September 28. It is expected 
that with this fresh start the team will 
have an exciting and successful year. 



October 1 , 1986 October 1 , 1986 

DEADLINE!! 

For all employment time sheets and 
reports of work prior to August 31 , 1986 
as per Dr. Mertz's memorandum of Au- 
gust 1986. (See below.) Turn in all pa- 
pers and reports to the Placement Office 
1st floor Miller Hall. 

H. William Craver 
Director of Placement 
& Applied Programs 

EMPLOYMENT 
PROGRAM RECORDS 

Several years ago the guidelines under 
which the Employment Program oper- 
ates for all majors were reviewed exten- 
sively and modified. The revised guide- 
lines have been published frequently by 
memorandum (from the Dean and from 
the Director of Placement and Applied 
Programs) and in the student newspaper, 
both distributed to all students. This year 
we are instituting some further revisions 
of the program's guidelines, revisions 
dealing with the student reports that are 
required in order to earn credit in the 
program. 

It has come to our attention that a 
number of students have not been meet- 
ing the guidelines and deadlines estab- 
lished for the Employment Program. The 
revised guidelines are listed below 
Please review them carefully. The 
satisfactory completion of the Employ- 
ment Program is a requirement for 
graduation. "Satisfactory completion" 
means, literally, meeting the program's 
requirements as listed below: 
1 . The Registration and Job Approval 
form (available in the Placement Of- 
fice, Miller Hall) must be completed 
and returned to the Placement Office 
not later than two weeks after the start 
of the employment for which credit is 
being sought. 

This requirement has not changed. 
Failure to meet this requirement will 
result in no credit for employment 
completed more than two weeks 
before the completed Registration 
and Job Approval form is submit- 
ted. The reasons for this require- 
ment are (a) the evaluation of the 
student's employment experience 
involves a visitation and/or inter- 
view while the student is still on the 
job; accomplishing that requires that 
the Placement Office have a record 
of each student who is currently ac- 
tively working on the Employment 
Program; (b) an employment ex- 
perience is not eligible for consider- 
ation for credit without the approval 
of the student's Department Chair- 
man; that approval is given on, and 



PLACEMENT OFFICE 

INTERVIEWS FOR THE 

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 15 

Monday, September 15 

PA. DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE 
DVC Poultry Diagnostic Lab 
Part-time employment 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

SIGN-UP IN THE PLACEMENT 
OFFICE FOR ALL INTERVIEWS. 

Any student interested putting their 
name on the Placement Office ONE- 
DAY JOB LIST, please come in and 
sign -up. Thank you. 



is based upon, the information con- 
tained in the Registration and Job 
Approval form. 

2. For summer employment, time sheets 
and a summary report for each six- 
week work period must be submitted 
to the Placement Office not later than 
October 1. (Late reports will be down- 
graded one letter grade for each week, 
or part thereof, they are late.) In addi- 
tion, an overall summary report is due 
at the time the last six-week report is 
submitted. Guidelines on the content 
of these reports are contained in the 
Employment Program packet available 
in the Placement Office (Miller Hall). 

There are changes here. The six- 
week reports had formerly been 
due within four weeks of the end of 
each six-week employment period 
and the final evaluation report had 
been due by eight weeks after the 
last employment period. 

3. For employment experiences acquired 
during the academic year (either part- 
time or, for students on a co-op pro- 
gram, full time) the deadlines for all 
reports are February 1 (for the Fall 
semester) and June 15 (for the Spring 
semester) . 

This, too, is a new guideline. 
As will be noted from the above proto- 
cols, students who did register for Em- 
ployment Program credit for the summer 
of 1986 but failed to keep up with their 
reporting during the summer (under the 
previous guidelines) will have until Octo- 
ber 1 , 1986 to complete and submit all of 
their reports to the Placement Office. 
Students who failed to register for the 
Employment Program for the summer of 
1986 but who worked will, unfortunately, 
not be eligible for credit for that 1986 
employment experience. It is our position 
that we cannot be expected to credit em- 
ployment experiences we have not had 
an opportunity to evaluate in the field. 

Finally, we will note that it has been 
our custom for some years that seniors 
who satisfactorily complete all of their 
program's coursework requirements but 
fail to complete their Employment Pro- 
gram before Commencement will be 
permitted to participate in the graduation 
exercises with their class but will not re- 
ceive their diploma (or have their tran- 
script annotated as a graduate) until the 
Employment Program requirement is 
completed. We expect this practice to 
continue. 

Mr. Craver and his staff in the Place- 
ment Office stand ready to assist any and 
all students in meeting the unique Em- 
ployment Program requirement of DVC. 
You will find them very helpful. 

John C. Mertz 
Dean of 
Academic Affairs 



SPRING BREAK 

Campus representative needed as 
SPRING BREAK trip promoter. Eam a 
free trip to Nassau. Past experience in 
student promotions necessary. Contact 
Nancy DeCarlo at Atkinson & Mullen 
Travel, Inc., 606 E. Baltimore Pike, 
Media, PA 19063. 



TUTORING CENTER OPENS 

The Tutoring Center, located in the 
basement of Segal Hall, is now open to 
students on a drop-in basis. Schedules 
will be distributed soon with time blocks 
for specific subjects. 



STAFF 

Editors in-Chief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Reporters Janice Behman, Missy 

Brangan, Brett Hart, Rob Hipszer, 

Kathleen McGough, Cheryl Snyder, 

Brian Taggart, Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry, Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 

Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news In the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 



SPORTS WRAP-UP 

SptRyg 



LITZKES 
SPORTS* BRIEFS 

by John Litzke 

• In the first week of local football action 
it was: 

C.B. East 13, Arch. Wood 6 
Abington 20, Pennridge 6 
Truman 28, N. Catholic 14 
Neshaminy 24, Egan 14 
Easton 14, Council Rock 
U. Dublin 26, LaSalle 16 
Arch. Kennedy 15, U. Moreland 
Springfield 20, Cheltenham 7 
Bishop McDevitt 31, W. Tennent 
Quakertown 13, Emmaus 13 
Owen J. Roberts 13, Souderton 7 
Lansdale Cath. 21, H-Horsham 
Pennsbury 7, Father Judge 6 

• In Las Vegas, international boxing 
champion Michael Spinks knocked 
down Norwegian challenger Steffen 
Tangstad twice in the 4th round 
(September 6) to retain his title. 

• Meanwhile, undefeated heavyweight 
and soon to be champ, Mike Tyson 
showed devastating punching power 
and stopped Alfonzo Ratliff at 1:41 of 
the 2nd round to set up a WBC title 
shot against champ Trevor Berbick in 
Las Vegas on November 22. 

• After defeating Chris Everett in the 
semi-finals, Helena Sukova went for 
the upset vs. Martina Navratilova in the 
women's final of the U.S. Open but 
Martina proved to be too strong and 
won her 3rd straight U.S. Open Cham- 
pionship. On the men's side, the upsets 
continued as Czechoslavakian Miroslav 
Mecir downed West Germany's Boris 
Becker 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3. #1 
seeded Ivan Lendl, who defeated 
Stefan Edberg to advance to the final, 
met Mecir in the final and proceeded to 
victory in straight sets 6-4, 6-2, 6-0. 

• On the college football scoreboard 
(week 1): 

Alabama 42, Vanderbilt 10 
Auburn 42, Tenn. -Chattanooga 14 
Brigham Young 52, Utah St. 
Oklahoma 38, UCLA 3 
Miami, FL 23, Florida 15 
Penn St. 45, Temple 15 
Nebraska 34, Florida St. 17 

• In other games of interest: 
Juniata 26, Lebanon Valley 
Upsala 25, Kean 12 
Widener 10, Norwich 6 
Delaware St. 30, Boston U. 9 
Delaware 44, Rhode Island 10 

• Associated Press Top 20 (as of Sep- 
tember 7): 1. Oklahoma; 2. Michigan; 



Chorale / Band 

Freshmen, transfers and anyone else 
interested in Chorale and/or Band, the 
two organizations are interested in seeing 
new faces and hearing new talent. Even 
if you never participated in a Chorale or 
Band organization before, come on out 
and have a good time. 

Practice times are Mon. and Wed., 
4:30-5:30 for Chorale and Tues. and 
Thurs., 4:30-5:30 for Band. 



3. Miami, FL; 4. UCLA; 5. Alabama; 
6. Penn St.; 7. Texas A&M; 8. Nebras- 
ka; 9. Ohio St.; 10. Tennessee; 11. 
Florida St.; 12. Baylor; 13. Florida; 
14. Auburn; 15. LSU; 16. (tie) Georgia 
and Washington; 18. Brigham Young; 
19. Arkansas; 20. Michigan St. 

• Paul Sonnert, who became famous 
when he disguised himself as a New 
York Met and went through batting 
practice and outfield practice before 
being chased off of the field by Dodger 
manager Tommy Lasorda during this 
year's All-Star game, has been fined 
$900 for criminal trespassing. Paul is 
also known to have put himself across 
as a friend of Jack Nicholson's and ac- 
cepted his Academy Award for him in 
Nicholson's absence during a recent 
awards program. This man is leading a 
very interesting life. 

• Last Sunday's top passing perfor- 
mances (and there were many): Joe 
Montana, S.F. : 32 of 46 for 356 yds. ; 
Dan Fouts, S.D.: 23 of 35 for 293 
yds.; Marc Wilson, L.A.: 20 of 33 for 
346 yds.; Ken O'Brien, N.Y. Jets: 18 
of 25 for 318 yds.; Jim Kelly, Buf.: 20 
of 33 for 292 yds. ; Ron Jaworski, Phil. : 
23 of 40 for 227 yds. ; Jay Schroeder, 
Wash.: 19 of 38 for 289 yds.; John 
Elway, Den.: 21 of 35 for 239 yds. 
And the top rushers in week *1 would 
have to be: Eric Dickerson, LA. Rams: 
38 carries for 193 yds. and James 
Jones, Det.: 36 carries for 174 yds. 

• Results of week # 1 and schedule for 
week *2: 

Washington 41, Philadelphia 14 
Atlanta 31, New Orleans 10 
Chicago 41, Cleveland 31 
Detroit 13, Minnesota 10 
San Diego 50, Miami 28 
Houston 31, Green Bay 3 
LA. Rams 16, St. Louis 10 
San Francisco 31, Tampa Bay 7 
N.Y. Jets 28, Buffalo 24 
Denver 38, L.A. Raiders 36 
New England 33, Indianapolis 3 
Kansas City 24, Cincinnati 14 
Seattle 30, Pittsburgh 
Dallas 31, N.Y. Giants 28 
Last night: New England vs. N.Y. Jets 
Coming on Sunday: Philadelphia at 
Chicago; Buffalo at Cincinnati; Cleve- 
land at Houston; Dallas at Detroit; 
Green Bay at New Orleans; L.A. Raid- 
ers at Washington; St. Louis at Atlan- 
ta; San Diego at N.Y. Giants; San 
Francisco at L.A. Rams; Minnesota at 
Tampa Bay; Indianapolis at Miami; 
Kansas City at Seattle. 
Monday night: Denver at Pittsburgh 

• As of last Sunday, Mets magic number 
down to 6 and shrinking fast, I'm sorry 
to say for all you Phillies fans, like 
yours truly. Phils are playing well and 
.are looking to finish a strong 2nd and 
looking towards 1987 as well. Early 
prediction (maybe even too early!): 
Look for an east coast World Series 
with Boston and the Mets, but stranger 
things have happened. Last year 1 
picked Toronto and St. Louis so let's 
wait and see. 



Student Store 
Set Hours 



Normal Hour* 

Monday -Friday 8:45 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Special Hours are: 
Homecoming - 9/27/86 

9 a.m. -5 p.m. 

Open BEFORE and AFTER 

all football games. 



Sports Quiz 

QUESTION #1: 



Welcome to DVC Sports Trivia! Each 
week there will be a sports quiz question 
and the first right answer drawn will re- 
ceive a coupon for a free Aggie burger, 
french fries and medium Pepsi from the 
Caesar's Snack Bar. If you think you 
have the correct answer to the question, 
put your name and box * with your 
answer on a slip of paper and put it in the 
"Ram Pages Sports Trivia" answer box at 
the end of the lunch counter in the Snack 
Bar. Here's the first question. 



* 



Who Is the only major league player 
to win Most Valuable Player awards 
In both the National and American 
leagues and with what teams? 

The drawing will be done Monday nights. 



Aggies Looking to Volley 
for Position In MAC 

by John Litzke 

Even though it's still early in the Dela- 
ware Valley ladies volleyball pre-season, 
second year coach Barry Fox is pleased 
with what he's seen so far. 

"We just got started practicing but I've 
noticed tremendous improvements in 
the returnees from last season," com- 
mented coach Fox. "The team looks 
very good and has the definite possibility 
of being a playoff contender." 

With the loss of outstanding seniors 
Chris Lefevre and Michele Heffner, a 
DVC volleyball enthusiast might think 
that it'll be tough to fill their shoes. But, 
Coach Fox has the necessary bricks to 
patch up the holes in the DVC volleyball 
fortress. 

Returning to do battle in the tough 
Middle Atlantic Division are Connie 
Hajioannou, Sharon Chapman, Vicki 
Keener, Trish Dollarton, Chris Gerlach 
and Debbie Stackhouse. "I have three 
good setters returning in Connie, Vicki 
and Sharon and Trish and newcomer 
Donna Bradley are good spikers so I'm 
looking for a contending season," com- 
mented Fox. 

New arrivals onto the volleyball squad 
are freshmen Lori Ortiz, Donna Bradley, 
Sue Stoltzer, Victoria Blezejewski and 
juniors Michele Morgan and Demaris 
Montanez. 




; r • 






* 4m 




As for the schedule and who's going to 
be rough and tough. Well, Moravian, 
Messiah and Scranton always give a 
good fight and Muhlenberg has a new 
coach so they're expected to be improved. 

A lot of questions will be cleared up 
once the season starts (as they are in 
most cases) but the 1986 Lady Aggies 
volleyball team will be ramming into the 
MAC with all the force they can muster. 
It should be a good one, so come out 
and give them your support. 



Aggie Kickers Looking 
to Turn it Around 

by Brett Hart & John Litzke 

With a final record of four and 16 last 
season, the only way to go is up as the 
Aggies enter the 1986 MAC soccer sea- 
son with a few new faces, new leadership 
and a new attitude. 

"We need a little more working togeth- 
er, but I was very pleased with what I saw 
today," commented coach Simpson fol- 
lowing his team's scrimmage game with 
Philadelphia Bible College. 

This soccer team can't be satisfied with 
a well below .500 record any longer. 
Assuming leadership on the field is soph- 
omore midfielder Dan Rothenheber and 
new goalie Paul Ajemian. "We need to 
move to the bail more, we can't stop like 
we've been doing in the past," exclaimed 
Paul. 

In order for this team to come out of 
1986 with a winning season they must 
work together, they need to take advan- 
tage of the ball when it is in the offensive 
zone and they need to take their time 
and make crisper, more accurate passes. 

Returning to the squad in this turn 
around season are seniors Doug Rum- 
berger. Gerry Saul and Bill Van Nos- 
trand. Alex Simpson and Rich Berger 



return as well along with Dan Rothen- 
heber, Jeff Samsel, John McQuade and 
Ray Schilling. A few new faces which 
were standouts this preseason are Alex 
Williamson, Phil Racobaldo, Jeff Neary, 
Don Nardi and Frank Seidel. 

This team has the potential to be a 
winner and I don't think there is anyone 
on this campus or in the MAC who wants 
to prove it more than they do. 

ATTENTION FRESHMEN 

In the near future all freshmen will be 
contacted by their peer counselors for a 
group meeting. Attendance for these 
meetings is mandatory! 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

'Do/ Vol's hom&away from home" 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: Cooler Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

Area's Best Lunches 11 AM-3 PM 

Hoppy Hour 4-6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain. PA 
348-1968 



Cross Country 1986 



by John Litzke and 
Dr. Bob Berthold 

The DVC Men's and Women's Cross 
Country teams extend an open invitation 
to anyone who might be interested in 
running cross country this fall. Although 
prior running experience is sometimes 
helpful, a significant number of our varsi- 
ty runners began their careers here at 
DVC. 

Both the men's and women's 1985 
teams have lost some key people through 
graduation, and therefore there is a great 
need for new team members to help 
compliment those members returning 
from last year's squads. 



Returning for his 18th year as men's 
coach will be Dr. Bob Berthold and he 
will also be head coach of the women's 
team. There is also the possibility that 
"Doc" Berthold will be assisted when 
possible by track coach Mr. Dick Acker, 
nationally ranked distance runner Miss 
Jan Yerkes and former Aggie and tri- 
athlete Miss Lori DiDinato. 

If you think that you might be in the 
least bit interested in running cross coun- 
try here at DVC, you are urged to report 
to the lobby of the James Work Gym- 
nasium daily between 4 and 4:15 p.m. 
prepared to practice. Please look for and 



introduce yourself to Dr. Berthold when 
you arrive. 

Cross Country coach Bob Berthold 
takes a relatively inexperienced team in- 
to MAC competition although seniors 
Dave Spotts (captain), John Tomson 
(co-captain) and Gary Kampmeyer along 
with Jim Enoch add some MAC know 
how to the '86 squad. 

"I am a perennial pescimist," said 
coach Berthold on his expectations of 
the team. "I'll know more about this 
team once we have our first meet under 
our belt." 

Lack of depth, for both the women's 
and men's teams, is a major concern of 



Berthold but the entire team's attitude 
has been extremely positive and they've 
worked hard the entire preseason The 
perspective of not having a women's 
team this season was there but just about 
all the credit for recruiting runners should 
go to ladies captain, Trish Moorzitz who 
was instrumental in maintaining the 
women's side of the team. 

Look out for Haverford, who is always 
a real test, Susquehanna, Philadelphia 
Pharmacy and Swarthmore. All should 
be tough opponents for DVC this sea- 
son. The official start of the season is 
Saturday, September 13 at home vs. 
Haverford. Good luck to all the runners. 



DVC BLANKS GLASSBORO 

IN CORN LEAGUE 

SCRIMMAGE 

by John Litzke 

Last Friday, DVC traveled in quite a 
bit of a rainstorm to Glassboro to meet 
the Bulldogs in the first scrimmage of the 
1986 season for both clubs. But even 
though it was preseason, some heavy 
hitting was going on. 

The defense was superb as they scored 
two of the three DVC touchdowns and 
kept a tight blanket on the Glassboro of- 
fense throughout the entire game enroute 
to a 20-0 exhibition victory. 

The scoring began in quarter number 
one when Glassboro dropped back to 
punt on fourth down, the punt was 
blocked by an unknown DVC player, 
Steve Clark scooped up the loose ball 
and bolted 19 yards for the score. 
Freshman place kicker John Fox added 
the extra point for a 7-0 lead. 

The Glassboro offense was as predict- 
able as soggy cornflakes in the morning. 
In their following series they passed, 
passed, passed and punted and many of 
their series' looked this way. (For the 
game: 11 of 30 passing for 78 yards.) 
Then, after the punt, on some very tough 
running by junior tailback Jimmy Wilson 
(13 carries, 58 yards, 4.5 avg.) and se- 
nior fullback Joe Bello (6 carries, 34 
yards, 5.6 avg.) the DVC offense went 
50 yards on 10 plays and was capped by 



a one-yard touchdown burst by Jimmy 
Wilson and the missed extra point made 
it 13-0. 

With prospective starting quarterback 
Walt Kobryznski sidelined with an injury, 
junior Andy Hower was given the start- 
ing nod and he did a fine job as did his 
backup Clay Butterworth and Rod Kwait- 
kowski, although all total, the DVC quar- 
terbacks completed only two of 19 passes 
for 26 yards and one interception. 

The "D" came through for the final 
touchdown when, with Glassboro pinned 
inside their own six-yard line, quarter- 
back Larry Louis faded back to pass, was 
flushed out of the pocket and retreated 
into his own endzone. There he was im- 
mediately crushed by senior linebackers 
Greg Currie and Vince Bedesem and the 
ball popped loose and was pounced on 
by a host of players. Sophomore end 
Seamus McGIone came up with it for the 
touchdown and the ensuing extra point 
made it 20-0 and that's the way it ended . 

I guess the scrimmage answered a lot 
of questions in the mind of coach Wilson 
and with the outstanding play of the first 
team offense and defense, the team looks 
prepared for opening day. 

Speaking of opening day, it's this Sat- 
urday, September 13 when the team 
travels to Gettyburg to meet head coach 
Barry Streeter's Centennial League 
Champion Gettysburg Bullets. The home 
opener will be the following week, Sep- 
tember 20 when DVC will face Albright. 



DVC FIELD HOCKEY: 
Working Together to Win 

by John Litzke 

The division known as the Middle At- 
lantic Conference is a veritable forest of 
hockey talent. Awaiting cautiously behind 
each tree, ready to strike, are powers like 
Drew (MAC champions), Scranton and 
Wilkes. But armed with axes and the 
instruments of their game, the DVC 
women's field hockey team will chop 
their way through the MAC forest and 
come out on top. 

In her debut season, head coach Pam 
Spotts leads a strong, disciplined and 
hard working squad onto the field. Pam 
is a former MAC field hockey player her- 
self, playing four years at Messiah. She 
had been working for the last two years 
as Carlisle High School's hockey coach 
and when asked if her switch from high 
school coaching to college coaching was 
a tough change she replied, "It really 
hasn't been a tough change at all. Every- 
body is working together and they are all 
very open and willing to work hard." 

The ladies are looking to improve upon 
their 1985 record of 6-5-1 and paving 
the way into the season is senior and 
captain Tina Drey. Tina is a link which, 
in hockey terms, means she is the go- 
between or link as the team converts 
from offense to defense and vice versa. 
"Tina is a very strong player with a good, 
reliable stick," commented coach Spotts. 

Joining Tina is a lot of experience and 
pure hockey smarts as returning to the 
1966 squad are goalie Lynn Schumacher, 
Jackie Heflich, Dee Pisauro, Deb Masculli, 



Stacy Hoover, Colleen Callahan, Lisa 
Long and Beth Kan. 

Returning to the team after a single 
season layoff is Randi Kunkel, whose 
hard play and athletic ability are only 
going to make the team better, Bonnie 
David, who will give more help to the 
line and halfback Tracy Marshall. 

Coach Spotts welcomes Karen Ryn- 
kowski and Becky Smith to the 1986 
team . "Karen's strengths are in the open 
field and she has a good working knowl- 
edge of the game and Becky is a very 
good goalie and the goalie of the future. 

"I'm looking for a very competitive 
team this season, at least .500," said 
coach Spotts. The one possible disad- 
vantage to the squad is that the team isn't 
very large and not being able to have 
inter-squad scrimmages during practice 
sessions could hurt the ladies' chances as 
the season wears on. The problem of 
substitutions could also come into play. 

"I'd like for this team to become more 
of a finesse team with good hockey 
sense, not just a power hockey team 
they've been in the past," concluded 
Spotts. 

The main strength of the 1986 women's 
field hockey team is their "working to- 
getherness" and combined with hard 
work and the determination to make it 
through the MAC forest, only the best 
can be foretold. 

The hockey team opens the 1986 
campaign with consecutive away games, 
September 11 vs. Gwynedd-Mercy and 
September 19 vs. Muhlenberg. They 
open for the first time at home on Sep- 
tember 22 vs. lmmaculata. Come out 
and give them your support. 



MAXWELL FOOTBALL CLUB 

FAD 

FIGHT AGAINST DRUGS 



HS 



T.M. 



* * * * 



F.A.D. 

They're Out to Get You! 

by John Litzke 

The problem of drugs has now spread 
from coast to' coast and the time is now 
for us to combat a problem that is fast 
becoming a national tragedy. 

Just recently, the Maxwell Football 
Club of Philadelphia decided to take a 
stand in the fight against drugs. With the 
help of major companies such as Smith- 
Kline, French Laboratories, KYW-TV 3. 
NIKE and concerned coaches, trainers 
and citizens, F.A.D. hopes to succeed in 
the war against drug tenorists and drug 
abuse. FAD., Footballers Against Drugs, 
will emphasize drug education among 
college, high school and junior high 
school and youth league athletes. 

Leading the anti-terrorist force is our 
own head football coach Mr. Al Wilson 
whose concepts and ideas are the back 
bone of this fight. Mr. Wilson is Vice 
President of Drug Education for the Max 
well Club and Chairman of the Maxwell 
Football Club F.A.D. program. 

"DVC is proud to become the flagship 
of this program," said Wilson. "Because 
of our outstanding sports medicine situa- 
tion at the college and because of the 
previous support given to sports medi- 
cine by the Maxwell Club, the FAD. 
seminar (which occurred on June 6 and 
attracted thousands of young people 
from all over the Delaware Valley) pro- 
vides the perfect setting to launch the 
FAD. program." 

If Wilson's long range plans develop to 
their fullest potential, the Maxwell Club's 
fight against drugs through FAD. will 
evolve into Families Against Drugs. 
When that happens, FAD. will truely 
become a "way of life" according to 
Wilson. 

"It's an educational process," he ex- 
plained. "It's starting out on the collegiate 
level and will spread to high schools, 
junior highs and youth leagues. I tend to 
believe that people have to be emotion- 
ally involved to work at something and if 
we can get enough football people in- 
volved I think entire families will even- 
tually get involved. The initial response 
to FAD. has been tremendous," said 



Wilson. Already Widener, West Chester, 
Villanova, Cheyney, Temple, Ursinus, 
Glassboro, Swarthmore and the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania have joined the 
F.A.D. team. 

"Through a unified effort, this is only 
the beginning," said Wilson. "In addition 
to the colleges and universities that have 
already joined, suburban high schools 
such as C.B. West, Neshaminy and Wis- 
sahickon as well as teams from the Public 
League, Catholic League and Inter- Ac 
League have become members of the 
F.A.D. team." 




Coach Al Wilson, coordinator of FAD., needs 
your support 



F.A.D. is a powerful weapon. FAD. 
is prevention. F.A.D. is drug education. 
Time has expired. It's all over the news- 
papers. Tragedy because of CRACK, al- 
cohol, marijuana, cocaine and heroin as 
well as others. Together we can outnum- 
ber the enemy and together we can win! 
GET INVOLVED TODAY! JOIN THE 
TEAM! 



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AGGIES vs. PENN STATE 

On the soccer field, the Aggies came 
back from a 4-1 deficit to tie Penn State in 
a body beating style of soccer. Scoring 
goals for DVC were Bill Van Nostrand, 
Frank Seidel, Jeff Neary and Alex Simp- 
son with the clincher in the second half. 

It looks as if the Aggies aren't going to 
put up with being pushed around any- 
more. The explosive offensive led by Alex 
Simpson and Phil Racobaldo showed 
Penn State they meant business. 

"I'm very satisfied with what 1 saw 
today and I hope it continues," said coach 
Simpson. 

With a very tough schedule including 
teams such as Swarthmore, Drew and 
Widener, this team will have to work 
hard, and we all wish them the best of 
luck. 





BDtSflfflwaia^^Dnikssf ©sOBtsg® 



Vol. XXI. No. 3 

Friday, September 19, 1986 




NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



All the news 
that fits, 
we print." 



Students Complete with 
Professional Florists 

by Dr. John Martin 

Thirteen students enrolled in the Col- 
lege's Advanced Floral Design course 
will complete head-to-head with profes- 
sional retail florists at the Philadelphia 
Design School and Trade Fair sponsored 
by F.T.D. District 3-B. It was Delaware 
Valley College, four years ago, who peti- 
tioned F.T.D. to allow students to com- 
pete in the design contests. Since that 
time, Del Val has consistently participated 
and has beat out the professionals on oc- 
casion. The contests will be held Septem- 
ber 21st and 22nd this year at the Valley 
Forge Convention and Exhibit Center in 
King of Prussia, Pa. 

Our students will be competing in three 
different design contests this year. Del 
Val entries will, in fact, comprise ten per- 
cent of entries this year, an all-time high 
for student participation. Students will be 
vying with the professionals for $900.00 
in prize money. The six teams competing 
and their contest categories are as follows: 
Table Decorating Category Team # 1 

Valerie Ingling 

Julie Myers 

Deborah Pomroy 

Table Decorating Category Team *2 

Judy Henry 

Nina Wommack 

Fireplace / Mantel Category Team # 1 

Patricia Duffy 

Wendy Raubenheimer 

Fireplace /Mantel Category Team *2 

Brad Bewley 

Stephen Ercolino 

Door Decorating Category Team # l 

Mary Loeffler 

Bob LaBold 

Door Decorating Category Team *2 

Paul Quattrocchi 

Vickie Pierce 
The Philadelphia Design School and 
Trade Fair is one of the largest such in- 
dustry events on the east coast. It attracts 
hundreds of professional florists from 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey. Delaware. 
Maryland, New York, and beyond. 
F.T.D. is the oldest and largest Rowers 
by Wire service in the world, and District 
3-B is one of its most active units. For 
years, the district has assisted our students 
with its scholarship program and has 
vigorously supported florist education. 

Thanks to Counselors 

The Counseling Department would 
like to thank those peer counselors who 
showed up for the 8 a.m. meeting on 
September 10. The peer counselors are: 
John Stierly, Christine Schultz, Greg 
Christiansen, Bob Solly, Doug Hamann, 
John Boyd, Barbara Schwarz, Ray De- 
laney, Wendy Unger, William DeMarco, 
Joanna Toenniessen, David Handler, 
David Welsh, Gary Apgar, Jodi Brough, 
Carmen Zaffarano, Rick Dietrick, Joe 
Marano, Gerhard Wubbels, Greg Strait, 
Carl Schuchardt, Lisa fWdane, Leo 
Reaver, Annmarie Whitesell, Doug 
Kauffman and Jim Whitfield. Weekly 
and semester schedules are available in 
the Tutoring Center for student use. 



THE DVC ARBORETUM 

Design the Logo Contest 

While many recognize the beauty of 
Delaware Valley College's grounds, few 
realize that the College's central 50-acre 
campus portion is a bona fide arboretum 
and an institutional member of the Ameri- 
can Association of Botanical Gardens 
and Arboreta (A.A.B.G.A.). The arbore- 
tum was started many years ago as a tri- 
bute to naturalist Henry Schmieder, a 
long time DVC professor. It has grown in 
holdings and stature under the leadership 
of Mr. David Benner and most recently 
Mr. Frederick Ray. The Delaware Valley 
College Arboretum under Mr. Ray has 
experienced its most rapid development 
and has obtained national recognition. 

Like any progressive organization, our 
arboretum needs a unique symbol or logo 
to add extra impact on publications, sta- 
tionery, signage, etc. We need an excit- 
ing symbol for our beautiful campus and 
we need your help in creating it by enter- 
ing the Design the Logo Contest. Any 
member of the Delaware Valley College 
family (students, faculty, staff, or alumni) 
can enter. 

The rules are simple: 

1. The symbol or logo must capture the 
essence and excitement of our campus 
arboretum. 

2. The logo may be separate from or a 
part of the name Delaware Valley College 
Arboretum. 

3. The design must be rendered on a 9 x 
12 inch white vellum paper (paper is avail- 
able in the main OH. office located at 
the campus greenhouses) . 

4. The lettering and art work must be 
done in waterproof black india ink and 
be camera ready. 

5. The overall size of lettering and art 
work should be exactly twice the size of 
the finished logo. 



6. No more than two entries per person 
will be accepted. 

7. All entries become the property of Del- 
aware Valley College. While we will try 
to return non-winning entries, we cannot 
assume responsibility for any not returned. 

8. The judges' decision is final, and 
should no entry be found acceptable no 
cash prize will be awarded. 

9. All entries must be received by OCTO- 
BER 17th, 1986 to be eligible (entry 
forms are available from the main O.H. 
office located at the campus greenhouses). 

Immortalize yourself as the creator of 
Delaware Valley College Arboretum's 
first logo and win valuable prizes to boot. 
The winning logo designer will be award- 
ed either $50.00 in cash or a plant ma- 
terial selection valued at over $100.00. 
Runners-up will also receive valuable gift 
plants. All prizes winning designs will be 
printed in an upcoming issue of Ram 
Pages, 

Design the Logo Contest 
Entry Form 

(Please attach to logo entry) 

Name: 



Mm 
Check One: 


. Student 


Initial 

. Faculty 


Major /Dept.: 
Campus Address: 


Staff 

Class 


Alumni 








Campus Phone: 


« 




Home Address: 






■■ ' .■■ - '': v '"•' ';'-- '"'■'•'• •'■ ' 


Home Phone: 






Description and rationale for logo design: 





SUPERSTARS 

The faB Superstars games were off 
and running, sometimes stumbling, Sun- 
day afternoon on the field hockey field. 
Events included a sack race, dizzy bat 
race, flipper race, wheel barrel race, 
balloon race, mattress race, and a splash- 
down finale with a waterballoon toss. 
The top four teams were awarded cash 
prizes. They are as follows: 

First Place: 

Dave Spotts, Amy Ruth, Tina Drey, 

Greg Christiansen, Doug Rumberger, 

and Trish Moorzitz. 

Second Place: 

Connie Hajioannou, Tracy Marshall, 

Sharon Chapman, "Hardy", Ed Swap, 

and Jim Enoch 

Third Place: 

Kathy Lunova, Emily Canon, 

Joan Comly, Tom Await, 

Dan Rothenberger, and Mark Brinsky 

Fourth Place: 

Lori Oritz, Jeff Boob, Ty McSherry, 

Scott Mallardi, Joel! Pursel, 

and Lori Middour 

Thanks to all who participated! If there 

are any comments or suggestions for 

next year, drop them in Box 515. We'll 

be looking for you in spring! 



PUB NIGHT: 
DVCS THURSDAY NIGHT 

ALTERNATIVE 

by Ann Whitesell 

It was one of those exciting nights out 
on the DVC campus. Yes, it's Pub Night! 
For all you newcomers. Pub Night was 
established as an outlet for the "Thurs- 
day Night Party Scene." It is held twice a 
month in Caesar's Pub, and is sponsored 
each time by a club and /or Student Gov- 
ernment. Honestly, it's a great place to 
go out dancing and to socialize. 

Last week's Pub Night was a prime ex- 
ample. Phil was tending bar with a bunch 
of smiling business majors. (This was a 
non-alcoholic bar, of course.) The D.J. 
was going strong and the party was kick- 
ing hard at 10:30 p.m. The pub scene 
this year looks promising, but we need 
everyone to make it a really good time. 
So, everybody, "Let's get into the groove." 

October 1, 1986 October 1. 1986 
DEADLINE!! 
For all employment time sheets 
and reports of work prior to August 
31, 1986. Turn in all papers and 
reports to the Placement Office 1st 
floor Miller Hall 




DVC Welcomes New 
Dairy Superintendent 

by Missy Brangan 

On July 1st, Paul Knight was named 
the new superintendent of the Del Val 
Dairy. Paul, his wife Jean, and daughter 
Christi are originally from Woodbine 
farms in Airville, Pa. Woodbine farms is 
internationally known for the famous Hol- 
stein cow Northcroft Ella Elevation. 

Paul receives his degree in Dairy Sci- 
ence from Penn State. After spending 
several years working on his home farm, 
he decided to take the job at Del Val. His 
favorite part of the job is working with the 
students. He also says that he's learned a 
lot since coming to DVC. 

So far, he's helped bring the rolling 
herd average of 20,000/Ibs. of milk, and 
he has helped Mr. Morris with the feed 
program. Plans for the future include im- 
proving the present facility and bringing 
the herd average up even higher. 

So, if you haven't met Paul, stop down 
to the dairy for a visit. 




* 
* 



This Week on 
Campus * 

by Judy Henry 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 ^ 

Football (H) vs. Albright 
Cross Country (H) vs. WWtes/Kings 
Softball (A) vs. Drew ^ 

JAZZ CONCERT 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 

Judy's Birthday! * 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 

Field Hockey (H) vs. Immaculata, 

4 p.m. ^ 

TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 23 

Caricature artist, S C , 11 a.m. -3 p.m 

VoBeybatl (H) vs. Spring Garden. * 

7 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 

Comedy Show, Murph, A.P.R. 
Softball (H) vs. MuWenburg. 3:30 p.m 
' I RSDA^ M PTI MBI > . + 

Field Hockey (A) vs. Moravian 
Vofleyball (A) vs Moravian 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 * 

PEP RALLY, S.C., 7:30 p.m 
HOMECOMWG WEEKEND, parrying 

• 



DVC Senior Division 
Debuts 

The DVC Senior Division became a 
reality this week as 18 retired men and 
women met to learn more about the pro- 
gram and to choose courses to offer to 
the senior community this fall semester. 

The seminars— taught by retired per- 
sons, for retired persons— will meet one 
day a week from 10 a.m. until noon. 
This initial semester will start the first of 
Oct. and will continue through the se- 
cond week in Dec. 

Joseph Simmons, Chalfont, will lead 
a course on Public Speaking on Wed., 
Oct. 1. 

Edward P. Anderson, who initiated 
the Bucks County program on the pat- 
tern of a similar project at Harvard Uni- 
versity, will direct a seminar on Thought 
Forces That Shaped the 20th Cen- 
tury on Thurs., Oct. 2. This is a course 
that he led for 15 semesters in the Har- 
vard Institute for Learning in Retirement. 

The fourth seminar will begin later 
than the others. John Shukz of Plum- 
steadville will direct Computers and 
You on Fri., starting Oct. 17. 

The Senior Division participants will 
choose their own courses, teach their 
own courses and only senior (retired) 
persons will attend the courses. They'll 
meet in the DVC Student Center and 
register through DVC's Continuing Edu- 
cation Division. There is a $25 charge for 
registration for the fall semester for each 
participant. A library card for the college 
facility is included in this fee, and partici- 
pants may join any seminars offered by 
the Senior Division this semester. 

For further information, or to register 
for one or more of the seminars, please 
contact Dr. Gerald Handler, Director of 
Continuing Education (Senior Division) 
at 345-1500, ext. 2219. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Val's home away from home" 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: Cooler Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

/Area's Best Lunches 11 AM-3 PM 

Happy Hour 4-6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



Student Store Set Hours 

Normal Hours are: 

Monday Friday 8:45 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Special Hours are: 
Homecoming - 9/27/86 

9 a.m. -5 p.m. 

Open BEFORE and AFTER 
all football games. 

Dear Editors, 

Dear Editors, 

A serious problem is taking place on 
DVC's campus: "The laundry room." 
The machines are always overloaded. 
I'm talking about no machines available 
until 11 p.m. at night. The other problem 
is the cleanliness, or lack of it, down in 
the Segal laundry room. The most im- 
portant problem is the people who use 
these machines. I must clean out the 
machine before I put my clothes in it 
because the person before hand leaves 
hay, dirt or other pieces of garbage in the 
washer. I know this is an "ag" school, but 
I didn't know this meant that we all had 
to be farmers. Finally, if you take my 
clothes out, make sure the surface you 
put my clean clothes on is also clean. 

Fed Up With Dirty Laundry 



Guides Needed for 
Children's Farm Tours 

The Farm Tours for elementary school 
children will start the week of September 
29th this fall. Schedules are now being 
filled with reservations from area schools 
for the one-hour Del Val student-led tours 
of the Dairy and Farm # 3. 

These tours, planned through the Of- 
fice of Public Information, require coop- 
eration from YOU, the students. A very 
special form of community outreach, the 
tours bring over a thousand children and 
their teachers and parents to the campus 
each year. The visits are informally-led, 
with the guides relying on the animals 
themselves to provide the fun! Short, 
simple explanations add to the interest, 
sometimes coordinating with classroom 
"studies" on nutrition, farm products, or 
social studies. 

This semester, the tours are scheduled 
for Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 
mornings, 10:00-11:00, and Tuesday 
and Wednesday afternoons, 12:45- 1 :45. 
Tour guides will be paid for each touf 
they lead. 

If you like to spend time with young 
children, if you are interested in talking 
about the dairy and farm programs at 
your college, and if you can find time in 
your schedule for one or more tours, 
contact the Office of Public Information 
immediately. 

We need your help to make the farm 
tours this fall as successful as they have 
been in the past. Particular assistance is 
needed for the morning tour times. 

DVC Blankets Philadelphia 
With Beauty 

by Dr. John Martin 

March may seem ages from now. but 
for the over 40 students working on 
DVC's 1987 Philadelphia Flower Show 
exhibit, "Blankets of Beauty," March is 
ominously close. Planning for the exhibit 
has been underway since March 1986 
and is reaching a frenzied pace as we 
enter fall. The overall theme of the 1987 
show is "The Way We Were, Gardens of 
our Past." As in past years, the college's 
exhibit will be an educational one which 
does not closely follow the general 
theme. "Blankets of Beauty" will demon- 
strate the use of groundcovers to solve 
practical landscaping problems. All sorts 
of groundcovers will be featured, espe- 
cially those which are not well known to 
most gardeners but which are reliable for 
use in this area. 

The plan for the exhibit, which is still 
being fine tuned, calls for a shady, sunny 
and wet area. A stone path will meander 
through a woodland area where a brook 
gently flows under a small bridge. The 
path then climbs' up stone steps to a sun- 
nier, more elevated area of the exhibit. 
Clear labeling and signs will guide visi- 
tors, explain and demonstrate the useful- 
ness of groundcovers in a variety of com- 
mon garden situations. 

If you have any suggestions or com- 
ments about the exhibits or wish to help 
by donating plant material, expertise, 
etc., everyone working on the exhibit 
would love to hear from you. Come 
spring, as always, we hope to see you at 
the show. 







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Dear Editors, 

Dear Editors, 

"Dealing with the work load at DVC is 
too hard on the students." If that's your 
opinion, then read on: 

Last week in a Production class, mostly 
consisting of juniors, a student asked if 
the textbook could be used during exams 
to find formulae for problems. The pro- 
fessor answered, "No, because it is part 
of the learning process to learn a few 
basic formulas." Then another student 
remarked, "You mean you aren't going 
to give us any breaks?" 

Statements like this should never be 
heard in a college classroom, but they 
are, and they're getting worse. 

Who goes to college to get a break 
anyway? I have been here for two and a 
half years and I have never complained 
about the work. In fact, this college is 
easier on its students than my high school 
was. 

I have to work two jobs during the 
summers and at least 40 hours per week 
during the school year to attend DVC. I 
don't live on campus, so I have to keep a 
car on the road, put food on my table 
and keep up with my bills. Last week I 
had to go without food for two days and 
got four hours of sleep a day because my 
car needed repairs and bills were due. 
But I get by just fine. And I'm not com- 
plaining, because it will make what I 
achieve even more valuable. 

Go out into the world and see how 
easy the professors are on us. compared 
to what a boss would be like. Ask your 
boss for a break and you will get one: a 
permanent one. 

It's time we stop dreaming of the 
"search for the eternal buzz" (which has 
largely become a popular slogan on this 
campus), and start searching for our 
futures. 

Year after year we get older and then 
suddenly we are on our own . When do 
we realize that? It's your life now. No one 
will give you a break; it's up to you! 

Name withheld 




WHArS UP? 

by Cheryl Snyder 

If you still have bare walls in your 
room or if you need some more ex- 
citement in your life, then do not miss 
"Murph," the physical comedian or 
Gene Mater's cartoon portraits. 

Gene Mater will be available to draw a 
unique, personalized caricature of you 
on Tuesday, September 23 from 11 
a.m. to 3 p.m. in Caesar's Pub. Then, 
on Wednesday, September 24 at 8 p.m. 
in the Student Center All-Purpose 
Room. Murph will appear and proceed 
to thrill you beyond belief. His fast-paced 
production includes such feats as juggling 
and mime as well as stand-up comedy. 
His performing career has taken him not 
only throughout the U.S. but also the 
world t o such places as Amsterdam, 
where he entertained at the International 
Festival of Fools. However, his career 
also includes teaching performers. He 
was an instructor for Ringling Brothers, 
Barnum and Bailey Clown College from 
1981 to 1983. Fortunately for us. Murph 
fits vists to colleges into his performing 
schedule. He has entertained students at 
numerous colleges including Villanova. 
Dickenson and Bloomsburg. Now he is 
headed to DVC, so make sure you catch 
his act. 

Both events are being sponsored by 
the Student Government. 




Answer to last week's 
Collegiate Crossword. 



A man and his cat: Mr. Rellis holds Frisky. 
Photo /M. O'Neill 

Mr. Rellis' Baby 
Raised in Greenhouse 

by Melanie O'Neill 

Who has attended more freshman 
English classes in the old greenhouse 
classroom than any freshman ever did? 
Well, let me give you a hint: He's cross- 
eyed and quite overweight, he runs the 
greenhouse personnel with a firm paw 
and meows as if someone were playing 
his diaphragm like the bagpipes. Right, 
you guessed it — Frisky. He is one of 
DVC's more reclusive personalities but if 
you visit the greenhouse you will almost 
assuredly run into him. 

Mr. Rellis told me Frisky came to DVC 
seventeen years ago, almost by accident. 
He was in a maintenance man's truck 
and got out when it stopped at the green- 



house. When the truck pulled away. 
Frisky wasn't in it. He didn't mind and 
has lived happily ever after at the green- 
house. He's never wandered far. on oc- 
casion bringing back a mouse or a bird to 
show his expertise and usefulness Hunt 
ing isn't how he developed his bulk 
though, he got that by conning every- 
body who walked in the greenhouse into 
feeding him! 

By the way, I call Frisky "he" purely 
for grammatical reasons Mr. Rellis 
doesn't know his gender, and I (even be- 
ing a bio major) couldn't muster the in- 
discretion to look. 

I first met Frisky in my English I class. 
He attended with more regularity than I 
did. He would sunbathe on the desk in 
front of me and get up to leave via the 
door, or window whenever he felt like it. 
Since then I had only seen him occasion- 
ally until this past summer when 1 worked 
Security third shift. Every morning at 2 
he would start meowing as soon as he 
heard me walking out of the Ag building, 
until I opened the door. Then, with com- 
plete feline coolness he would make me 
hold the door open for five minutes until 
he decided to come in. Next he would 
sucker me into feeding him even if his 
bowl was full. 

At six in the morning he would want to 
go back out, or at least he would fake it. 
He'd go through one door and sit in the 
entrance until I'd yell at him that I didn't 
have time to fool around and he'd decide 
to go back in. 

At the end of the summer I was begin- 
ning to worry about old Frisky. He was 
looking haggardly, always laying around 
and appeared to be losing some weight. 
But he's fine now, so I guess another one 
of his nine lives kicked in. 



SPORTS WRAP-UP 

^1*2- Up 



LITZKES 
SPORTS' BRIEFS 

by John Litzke 

• In a series that, meant absolutely noth- 
ing to the Philadelphia Phillies, they 
played with intensity and determina- 
tion and swept the Mets taking three 
straight from the eventual National 
League East champions and booted 
them out of Philadelphia never to be 
heard from again in '86. And it's a 
good thing too. The Phils will finish a 
strong second in '86 and will have 
something to say about a National 
League East Pennant in '87. Congrat- 
ulations to Von Hayes & Mike Schmidt 
on a fabulous weekend. 

After the thrashing they got from Penn 
State last week. Temple did some 
thrashing of their own last Sat. as 
Heisman candidate Paul Palmer ran 
for 175 yards on 20 carries lifting Tem- 
ple to a 49-17 romp over Western 
Michigan. In other games last Sat. it 
was: 

Michigan 24, Notre Dame 23 
USC 31, Illinois 16 
LSU 35, Texas A&M 17 
Washington 40. Ohio St. 7 
Arkansas 21, Mississippi 
Pittsburgh 14, N.C. St. 14 
Alabama 31, S. Mississippi 17 
Georgia 31, Duke 7 
Miami, FL 61, Texas Tech. 11 
Arizona St. 20, Michigan St. 17 

In games of interest it was: 
Widener 3, Moravian 
Randolph-Macon 41, Swarthmore 13 
Albright 17. W. Maryland 
Juniata 21, Franklin & Marshall 11 
Washington & Jefferson 27, Catholic 
Wilkes 32, Lebanon Valley 
Susquehanna 17, Muhlenberg 7 
Lycoming 24, Lock Haven 21 
New Hampshire 28. Delaware 21 

• What can you say about Brigham 
Young University and outstanding 
quarterbacks. The two are synony- 
mous. Marc Wilson, Jim McMahon, 
Robbie Bosco and the latest is a guy by 
the name of Steve Lindsley, who last 
weekend, was 28 of 40 for 361 yards 
and 3 touchdowns in Brigham Young's 
31-30 victory over New Mexico. 

• I've heard from a very reliable source 
that the Philadelphia Public League 
football season may have to be can- 
celed due to the city's lack of an in- 
surance policy towards Public League 
football. I'll keep you updated on this 
situation. 

• In local high school football action this 
past weekend it was: 

Ridley 26, St. James 7 
Pennsbury 35, Wilson-West Lawn 7 
W. Tennent 14, Hatboro-Horsham 7 
Pennridge 20, Upper Perkiomen 
Methacton 17, Upper Dublin 14 
Lower Moreland 27, Bristol 8 
C.B. West 3, Downingtown 
Plymouth -Whitemarsh 6, Norristown 6 
Neshaminy 17, Upper Merion 6 
C.B. East 14, Council Rock 7 



• In Catholic League football last Fri. and 
Sat. it was: 

Father Judge 35, LaSalle 7 
Penn Wood 33, Marple-Newton 8 
Lansdale Catholic 14, Quakertown 7 
Glen Mills 13, Dougherty 6 
Wood 14, Ryan 
N. Catholic 3, Kenrick 

• And finally, in the NFL's week two, it 
was: 

Seattle 23, Kansas City 17 
Minnesota 23, Tampa Bay 10 
Miami 30, Indianapolis 10 

L.A. Rams 16, San Francisco 13 
New Orleans 24, Green Bay 10 
Cincinnati 36, Buffalo 33 OT 
NY. Giants 20, San Diego 7 
Atlanta 33, St. Louis 13 
Cleveland 23, Houston 20 
Dallas 31, Detroit 7 
Washington 10, L.A. Raiders 6 
Chicago 13, Philadelphia 10 OT 

• On Mon. night it was: 
Denver 21, Pittsburgh 10 

• Last night it was: 
Cleveland vs. Cincinnati 

• Sun. week three it will be: 
Denver at Philadelphia 
Atlanta at Dallas 

L.A. Rams at Indianapolis 

Miami at N.Y. Jets 

Pittsburgh at Minnesota 

St. Louis at Buffalo 

Seattle at New England 

Tampa Bay at Detroit 

Houston at Kansas City 

New Orleans at San Francisco 

N.Y. Giants at L.A. Raiders 

Washington at San Diego 

Mon. night: Chicago at Green Bay 

• Final notes: San Francisco quarterback 
could be out for the season and maybe 
permanently due to a severe back in- 
jury suffered last week. The romp of 
the week goes to Division I-AA Boise 
St. as they destroyed Humboldt St. last 
weekend 74-0. 

On the Soccer Front 

by Brett Hart 

This week the DVC Aggies faced two 
tough opponents and came up short. On 
Tuesday they faced Wilkes and lost a 
battle 2-0. On Saturday the Aggies faced 
a good Allentown team. The Aggies 
dominated the first and most of the sec- 
ond half but Allentown caught DVC with 
its defense down and scored in the last 
few minutes, the final score was 1-0. . 

Next week the Aggies face Swarthmore 
and a tough MAC opponent, Drew. 
Both games are away and the DVC kick- 
ers need your support! 

Campus Films 

by Bruce D. Bailey 

Campus Films would like to welcome 
everyone back for the fall semester. We 
hope you will all come and enjoy the 
films scheduled to be shown every other 
Tuesday and Wednesday nights. We 
apologize for the lack of interest shown in 
the two most recent viewings. We sched- 
uled lower rated pictures because we 
assumed there would be few people on 
campus and those who would be here 
over the holiday would be spending time 
getting to know people again. Movies to 
be shown this semester are: Wildcats, 
The Big Chill, Pee Wee's Big Adventure, 
Children of the Corn, Back to the Fu- 
ture, Somewhere in Time, Star Man and 
Target. 

Hope to see you at the movies!! 



DVC UPENDED IN 
SEASON OPENER 

by John Litzke 

It wasn't a good opener for DVC in 
their matchup against defending Centen- 
nial League Champion Gettysburg. 

DVC kept it close at half trailing only 
6-0. But the Bullets, behind quarterback 
John Bongo who passed for 107 yards 
and two touchdowns, compiled 24 sec- 
ond half points while holding DVC score- 
less and went onto a 36-0 shutout of 
DVC. 



Alexander); Mihalick 32-yard field goal; 
Bongo 23-yard pass to Nick Trainer 
(Mihalick kick); Oxley 15-yard fumble 
recovery for a score (kick failed) . Fourth 
Quarter: Wolfe 7-yard run (kick failed). 
DVC will return to the friendly con- 
fines of James Work Memorial Stadium 
tomorrow as they will face the Lions of 
Albright College whom they were very 
successful against last season. Like an 
Academy Award winner who finds him 
or herself in another outstanding position 
to make a great picture, we at DVC hope 
that our success will carry on against 
Albright this weekend. Let's win this one. 




The offensive backfield is an integral part of the success of DVC football '86 

"We just have to put this game out of 
our minds and get back to the basics," 
commented Coach Wilson. The team 
must retain their composure and their 
confidence after such a one-sided game 
and continue to incorporate more of the 
fundamentals into their football scheme. 

The stats from Saturday's game were 
as one-sided as the score with DVC 
committing five turnovers and collecting 
the identical number of first downs and 
that's just not DVC football as we know it 
can be. 

The Gettysburg scoring went this way 
—First Quarter: Bongo 54-yard pass to 
Howard Alexander (kick failed). Third 
Quarter: Flynn 11-yard run (Bongo to 




. . . and two of the three key parts of the Aggie 
backfield are senior fullback Joe Bella (33) and 
junior halfback Jim Wilson (44). 



Sports Quiz 

QUESTION *2: 



Who is the only player to appear 
In Major League Baseball's All-Star 
Game with four different teams? 

(Hint: He's a pitcher and still active.) 



* 



Drawing will be done Monday nights 
at 7 p.m. You have a week to answer 
each week's question. Please wait until 
after each Monday night's drawing to 
submit the next week's question. 



What About a Change: 
Aggies to Rams? 

Dear Editors, 

We feel that changes are good for this 
school, but let's not get carried away. 
Our nickname should remain as "DVC 
Aggies." 

This is an agricultural school. Look 
around. There are farms, fields, orchards 
and A- Day (Agricultural Day). 

Our business department is growing, 
but that does not take away from the ag- 
ricultural aspect of the college. 

If a person wants to major in business, 
but does not want to be called an "Ag 
gie," they can go to another college. 

Our school was built for agricultural 
purposes and is one of the best in the 
United States today. We are proud of 
this background and proud to be called 
"DVC Aggies!" 

Submitted by, 

an Animal Husbandry major, 
a Biology major, AND 
a Business major 



Dear Animal Husbandry, Biology & 
Business majors, 

Thank you for your letter. The school 
has been known as the Aggies for quite 
some time now, possibly 100 years or 
more and I think, as well as 150 and 
more people think, that it is time for a 
change. You are correct, the school is 
becoming more business and computer 
oriented. A change from Aggies to Rams 
would not take away from the agricultural 
aspect or reputation of the school, how- 
ever, a ram is an agricultural beast, our 
newspaper is called Ram Pages and our 
mascot is a sheep with very large conical 
shaped horns. 

The purpose of the petition is to see 
what our peers think . . . and if enough 
signatures are collected then I will submit 
it to the administration. The president is 
leaving after this year; the "Old Guard" is 
changing, and it could be time for a new 
mascot. 

If you have a view of this matter, your 
letters are very welcome. Submit them to 
John Litzke, Box 951. 



From the Counseling Department: 

The Ability to Concentrate 

Stated in simple terms, concentration 
is thinking. And during our waking hours 
we are, with varying degrees of intensity, 
thinking all the time. Actually, our supply 
of things about which to think and worry 
never runs out. William James, the fa- 
mous Harvard philosopher and psychol- 
ogist, said that some thought or idea tries 
to gain the focus of our attention every 
two or three seconds. These thoughts 
and ideas bang, rattle and knock on the 
door of our consciousness, trying to gain 
entry! It is no wonder, then, that it is so 
difficult to keep our minds on the job in 
hand. 

Imagine reading your text so intensely 
that you speak out to the author: "That's 
not proof enough," or "Other writers ex- 
plain it differently" or "I never thought 
about the problem that way before." 
That's concentration! 

Trouble in concentrating may come 
from many causes, often interrelated. 
For example, many students are so afraid 
of failing that the dread specter of failure 
takes more of their attention than their 
study assignments. Anxiety causes them 
to do poor work, and this in turn inten- 
sifies the fear they started with. Some 
students never get off this treadmill. But 
many do, and nearly all can, if shown 
the way. 

Fortunately, the ability to concentrate 
can be improved by learning to recognize 
the causes of poor concentration and by 
learning to control them as a matter of 
habit. The causes can be external or in- 
ternal distractions, physical or mental 
fatigue or lack of interest in the work to 
be done. All these, once recognized, can 
be overcome. 

The following list summarizes other 
techniques that have helped students 
concentrate. Try one or two at a time to 
see whether they are for you. 

Positive attitude. Try to look upon 
studying as an opportunity to leam, rather 
than as an unpleasant task to complete. 
Also, since you may be spending a great 
deal of time in your room, do not make it 
a prison; rather look to your room as a 
sanctuary. Remember, you are always 
free to take a well-earned break. 

Why does attention shift so often? 
It is quite natural for your attention to 
shift frequently. Probably this is an inheri- 
tance from our caveman ancestors who 
had to be constantly aware of what was 
going on around them. There will be 
shifts in attention, but try to confine these 
shifts within the subject matter at hand. 

The spider technique. A vibrating 
tuning fork held close to a spider's web 
will set up vibrations in the web itself. 
After the spider makes a few hurried but 
fly less investigations, it learns to ignore 
the vibrations. 

The next time that you are studying in 
the library and the door opens, don't 



look up. Controlling your impulse to 
look up will disturb your concentration 
on your work for the first few times. But 
very soon, like the spider, you'll leam to 
ignore these external disturbances. 

Becoming annoyed by the noise 
around you. There will always be some 
noise around us. Avoid disturbances if 
you can; but do your best to ignore the 
noise you cannot avoid. By all means do 
not let yourself become annoyed. The 
internal irritation that you create has a 
more devastating effect on concentration 
than the external noises themselves. 

Make sure you have everything. 
Before sitting down to study, make sure 
you have everything. Sharp pencils, 
fresh paper and cards, necessary books. 
Then stay in your chair until you have 
studied an hour or so. In that way, you'll 
remain in the driver's seat; that is, in 
control. 

The no-room principle. Imagine 
that certain pathways of your mind are 
completely filled with thoughts about the 
subject in front of you. Then there will be 
no room for extraneous thoughts, and 
they will be turned away. 

The checkmark technique. Have a 
sheet of paper handy by your book; then 
when you catch yourself not concen- 
trating, put a checkmark on the sheet. 
The mere act of checking will remind you 
to get back to work. Students report that 
when they first tried this system, they ac- 
cumulated as many as twenty checkmarks 
per textbook page; but. after one or two 
weeks, they were down to one or two 
checkmarks per page. 

Willpower. Willpower alone can't 
make you concentrate. You will be 
breaking concentration whenever you 
remind yourself, "I must use willpower to 
concentrate!" 

Hunger. Hunger is such a basic and 
persistent state that there is no sense try- 
ing to overcome it. Give in! Feed your- 
self, then go back to work. 

The secret technique: the pencil. 

I have saved the best for last. A technique 
that has never failed any student over the 
past twenty years is the simple, humble 
penc/7 technique. The technique is this: 
Wheneuef working to learn, always study 
with a pencil in hand. For example, if 
you are taking notes on a textbook chap- 
ter, stop after reading several paragraphs 
and very briefly, in your own words, write 
the key points made by the author. If, 
after reading several paragraphs, no 
words come to you, then you have no 
other recourse than to go back and read 
the passage again. This time, read with 
determination and concentration, to 
make sure that you learn the key points. 
The secret: activity promotes, almost en- 
sures, concentration. The pencil provides 
the activity! 

For more information on these and 
other skills contact Mr. Steve Davis at the 
Tutoring Center, ext. 2309. 



collegiate camouflage 



Memorandum 

To administration, faculty, staff and 
students— A Memorial Assembly for Dr. 
Peter Glick, Jr. will be held on Wednes- 
day, October 8, 1986 at 3:30 p.m. in the 
All-Purpose Room of the Student Center. 

Anyone who wishes to make some 
brief remarks should contact either my 
office or Dr. Mertz. 

Joshua Feldstein 



Tutoring Center Hours 

located in Segal basement 

Mon. - 12:20-2:35 p.m. 

4:15-10 p.m. 

Tues. — 6:30-10 p.m. 

Wed. - 8:30-11 a.m. 

1:20-10 p.m. 

Thurs. — 8:30 a.m. -1:10 p.m. 

6:30-10 p.m. 

Fri. - 8:30-11 a.m. 



HELP WANTED! 

$60 per hundred paid 

for remalling letters from home! 

Send self-addressed, 

stamped envelope for 

information/application to: 

ASSOCIATES 

Box 95-B, Roselle, NJ 07203 



Flowers, Flowers, Flowers! 

Get your Homecoming flowers from 

the DVC Student Flower Shop. 

You ask for it and we 11 get it. 

Don 't forget about the Lasker Hall 

extension of the Flower Shop 

FLOWERS FOR MOM. 

Hours are posted. 



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Can you find the hidden OLOGY's ? 



ASTROLOGY 

ECOLOGY 

EGYPTOLOGY 

EMBRYOLOGY 

ETIOLOGY 

GEOLOGY 

IMMUNOLOGY 



METHODOLOGY 

MICROBIOLOGY 

ONTOLOGY 

0R0L0GY 

PENOLOGY 

PHILOLOGY 

PHYSIOLOGY 



RADIOLOGY 

SEISMOLOGY 

SOCIOLOGY 

TECHNOLOGY 

TOPOLOGY 

TYPOLOGY 

ZOOLOGY 




NEW SIGN OF THE TIMES 

A new college sign has been installed 
at the south entrance (Alumni Lane and 
Butler Avenue). The class of 1986 ar- 
ranged the purchase and installation of 
the sign as its gift to DVC . The new sign 
includes a removeable letter section 
beneath the college name; it will help 
advertise major student activities. We 
hope it will help promote our activities in 
the community. 

Requests to publicize major events 
which are open to the public should be 
submitted to the Dean of Students Office 
on the Student Center second floor. 

Doylestown Nature Club 
Sponsors Scholarships 

The Doylestown Nature Club is offer- 
ing three $1,000.00 scholarships for 
DVC students majoring in Agriculture. 
One of these scholarships is designated 
for an OH. major. The other two are 
available to sophomores, juniors or 
seniors. The students must show an in- 
terest or involvement in nature and con- 
servation of natural resources and be a 
resident of Bucks County. Interested stu- 
dents should contact their Department 
Chairman for more information concern- 
ing the scholarship. Deadline for applica- 
tion is September 30, 1986. 



October 1 , 1986 October 1 , 1 986 
DEADLINE!! 
For all employment time sheets 
and reports of work prior to August 
31, 1986. Turn in all papers and 
reports to the Placement Office 1st 
floor Miller Hall. 

Are You Pi Alpha Xi Material? 

by Deb Pomroy 

Pi Alpha Xi, the honor society for stu- 
dents studying Ornamental Horticulture, 
is in the process of inducting new mem- 
bers. Qualifications for membership are: 

1 . DVC student majoring in Ornamental 
Horticulture. 

2. Currently hold junior or senior class 
status. 

3. Hold a minimum cumulative GPA of 
2.5. 

4. Hold a minimum GPA of 3.0 in 
courses from the Ornamental Horti- 
culture major. 

If you feel you have met all of these 
qualifications, and have not already 
received an invitation to join. Pi Alpha 
Xi. please see Mr. Cowhig or Paul Quat- 
trocchi immediately. 

STAFF 

Editors- in -Chief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Artist Monica Etzweiler 

Reporters Janice Behman, Missy 

Brangan, Brett Hart, Judy Henry, Rob 

Hipszer, Kathleen McGough, Melanie 

O'Neill, Cheryl Snyder, Brian Taggart, 

Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry, Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 

Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news In the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 






IBsflcrcwjffiB wllkisr ©sffiksfi® 



Vol. XXI. No. 4 

Friday, September 26. 1986 







NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



Come on home 
to DVC! 



HOMECOMING 

DVC — What it means to me 



WELCOME 
AND WELCOME BACK 

by Bill Rein. Editor 

It is a little bit earlier this year, but au- 
tumn has begun to reveal its colors to us, 
and the chilly night air reminds us that 
with the shift in seasons comes DVC's 
biggest event this side of A-Day: Home- 
coming. It's here right now, so don't de- 
lay — prepare the homecoming queen 
nominees, whip your float creations into 
shape, and catch that Homecoming feel- 
ing even before you become one of the 
alumni! 

There's never been so much to take 
part in at DVC in one weekend! 

Catch the spirit of your college life at 
DVC tonight, when the weekend festivi- 
ties start rolling at the annual Pep Rally in 
front of the Student Center on the Feld- 
stein Campus Court. Bruno (Sidney 
'Bruno' Brunwasser. Class of 1920). 
probably the most spirited of all alumni 
from the National Farm School/College, 
will be there again to be our "master of 
cheers." Show him that '87, '88, '89. 
and '90 can rival the best of them! Alumni 
president Bill Dunscombe will be there, 
too. along with our student government 
v.p. Wendy Raubenheimer. Even the 
Homecoming Queen and her court will 
be seen here first. It's free, it's fun. and it's 
for us, the student body. 

If you are up all night Friday and you 
missed the Pep Rally, your only excuse is 
that your club's float masterpieces were 
getting their finishing touches for Satur- 
day morning's Parade through Doyles- 
town. Our theme. "DVC — What it 
means to me" is open to interpretation, 
so get out there, find the concession 
stands, and see what everybody has come 
up with. 

Meanwhile, we are loaded with home 
games in every facet of sports available at 
DVC . Pick a game that you enjoy cheer- 
ing on the most, and it will probably be 
playing some time during Saturday. You 
don't have to miss that most traditional of 
Homecoming games — football — be- 
cause: Football, against Susquehanna, is 
at 1:00 p.m ; Soccer vs. Widener is at 
1 1 :00 a.m. ; or women's Volleyball against 
Fairleigh-Dickenson can be seen at 
11:00 a.m., too; Field Hockey Aggies 
will be playing Wilkes at 12 noon; and 
both men's and women's Cross Country 
will be starting at halftime football. 

Just think. If you take part in Home- 
coming even before you will think of it as 
"Coming Home," the more fun it will be 
in those years ahead when it will be your 
true DVC homecoming. This is definitely 
a time for alumni to come back, see new 
faces and old friends, and to show some 
of their spirit. I hope everyone has a 
good time. 



FORGETTING: The Relentless Foe 



from the Counseling Department 
The Strength of Forgetting 

During every moment of our waking 
hours, a constant stream of thoughts and 
impressions flows into our consciousness 
from all our senses. A series of tests by 
the famous psychologist Robert S. Wood- 
worth revealed that in only four weeks' 
time, we lose 98 percent of the total sum 
of these ideas, both the important and 
the unimportant ones. 

Forgetting is the biggest single problem 
faced by most students. The entire pro- 
cess of learning depends on decelerating 
forgetting and accelerating learning. We 
must develop powerful techniques and 
systems of study to overcome the deva- 
stating process of forgetting. 
The Memory Trace 

The mere fact that we do have memo- 
ries of previous experiences demonstrates 
that the nervous system does somehow 
retain a record . This record laid down in 
the brain is called a neural trace. It is 
analogous to the molecular change that 
takes place in a magnetic recording tape. 
Unfortunately, like the traces on a record- 
ing tape, the brain traces can be erased. 
Time and Forgetting 

Unless reviewed periodically, what we 
have learned in the past fades with the 
passage of time; consequently, we often 
assume that there is a cause-effect rela- 
tionship between time and forgetting. 
This conclusion, however, is erroneous. 
As Ian Hunter, a British psychologist, 
points out, "Iron rusts in time," but rust is 
not caused by time. The rust is caused by 
oxidation. Similarly, time itself does not 
cause forgetting; rather, it is what happens 
in time that does. 
Textbook reading 

A considerable amount of forgetting 
takes place even after reading material in 
which ideas are developed quite fully. 
Dr. J.N. Moore found that the average 
reader recalls only about half of the ideas 
in a textbook chapter that has just been 
read. 

It is logical to assume that by the time a 
student reaches the end of a chapter, 
some of the facts and ideas encountered 
at the beginning and middle of the chapter 
would have been forgotten. However, 
forgetting does not begin only after the 
word of the last page of the chapter has 
been read. The erosive power of forget- 
ting is constantly working to erase the 
memory traces of learning, even as the 
process of learning itself is going on. 
Listening and forgetting 

Remembering what you have heard is 
usually more difficult than remembering 
what you have read. In reading, you can 
slow down, pause, reflect, and even re- 
read. But in listening, you usually hear 
material only once, and you have to take 
notes, mental or written, to retain it. 



Pseudo- Forgetting 

The word "forgetting" is an umbrella 
under which is grouped many kinds and 
degrees of forgetting. Two types are not 
really forgetting at all, so let's dispose of 
them before turning to the causes of real 
forgetting. 
"You never had it" forgetting 

The word "forgetting" implies that a 
person has something to forget. But you 
cannot forget something that you never 
did have in the first place. For example, 
during an introduction a name may be 
mumbled and garbled so that it is never 
heard and learned in the first place; yet 
we often ascribe our not remembering 
such names to forgetting. 

The mental blur 

Akin to the "you-never-had-it-in-the- 
first-place" situation is the almost certain 
forgetting that goes along with incomplete 
learning. For example, an idea or fact is 
read and noticed in such general terms 
that no clear image is formed. Only a 
mental blur is recorded, similar to a blur 
of landscape on the film of a swiftly moved 
camera. 

If an idea or fact is to be retained in the 
memory, it must be impressed on the mind 
clearly and crisply at least once. A neural 
trace must be laid down in the brain. You 
cannot retain something that is not there 
in the first place. 
What causes forgetting? 

Of the various theories of forgetting, 
we will discuss only one; the interference 
theory. This theory has gained ascendancy 
because it seems to dovetail with reality 
and because it can be demonstrated. 

The first part of the theory deals with 
retroactive interference, which means 
that new learning interferes with, or 
masks, old learning. 

It is not simply the passage of time or 
the disuse of material that causes forget- 
ting; rather it is the accumulation of addi- 
tional knowledge that acts as a barrier for 
the full recall of previously learned ma- 
terial. It is this type of activity (learning — 
more learning — forgetting) t u ^t makes 
pursuits so difficult for many students. 
No wonder we have heard: the more you 
leam the more you forget! 

Proactive interference is the other part 
of interference theory. It is bad enough 
that new learning interferes with the recall 
of old learning, but there is additional 
bad news: earlier learning interferes with 
the recall of later learning. This process is 
also called proactive inhibition. 
Conclusion 

We have seen the power of the forget- 
ting process. We have traced the develop- 
ment of the forgetting curve, which shows 

(continued on page 2) 




Get ready to cheer with Bruno at the Pep Rally 
beg<nning 7:30 p.m. Friday. 

Photo/ 1985 Cornucopia 



* * * * 

Homecoming 
k Highlights 

by Missy Brangan 
FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 26 

if Pep Rally 7:30 p.m. 

Come out to the Joshua Feldstein 
Campus Court and help Bruno '20 
cheer us on!! The homecoming Queen 

* will be announced. 
President's Reception 8:30 p.m. 
Following the Pep Rally ail Alumni are 

* invited to attend an informal reception 
at President Feldstein's house on 
campus. 

* SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 27 

Homecoming Parade 9:30 a.m. 
The Aggies' parade of bands, floats, 
a and spirit cars through Doyiestown, 
This features homecoming queen and 
her court. It starts in the Doyiestown 
shopping center and ends up at C.B. 

* West high school. 
Admissions 10:00 a.m. 

Alumni and their children are invited 
^ to meet with Admissions Counselors. 
The Admissions Center will open at 
10:00 a.m. 

Alumni Registration 10:30 a.m. 

* Alumni registration begins at 10:30 
a.m. AS alumni are to register at the 
alumni tent by the Student Center. 

Campus Tours ll:a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 
Van tours of our campus will be con- 
ducted every half hour. Come out and 
see new and familiar facilities. 



* 

SUNDAY 

i, Aggie Alumni Brunch 

Served in the David Levin Dining Hafi 
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. 

Alumni Association Annual Meeting 
Held at 11:00 am in Mendel 114. 
Afl Alumni and friends are invited. 
Floral Design Workshop 
The OH, department wi sponsor a 
workshop for guests of Alumni during 
the time of the Annua] Business 
Meeting of the Alumni Association. 
11:00 a.m. in the Greenhouse Floral 
Design Lab. 






Aggie Hospitality and Pre-Game Buffet 
AJ Aggies and friends are Invited to 
the Alumni Tent for pre-game enter- 
tainment, beer and birch beer. The 
ever-popular Dixieland Band will be on 
hand for this event. 
Sports Action 
DVC Soccer vs. Widener College 

11:00 a.m. on the soccer field 
DVC Women's Volleyball vs. Fairleigh- 
Dickinson 

11:00 a.m. in James Work Gym 
DVC Aggie Football vs. Susquehanna 

1:30 p.m. at James Work Memorial 
Stadium 

Alumni Dinner Dance 

The Alumni Dinner Dance wifl be held 

in rite Student Center. 






Operation I.D. 

Once again this year the Residence 
Life Office is sponsoring Operation ID, 
Each campus resident will be given the 
opportunity to have their valuables per- 
manently engraved with their driver's li- 
cense or Social Security number. This 
type of program has proven very success- 
ful on other college campuses and muni- 
cipalites. In the case of lost or stolen pro- 
perty, the item can be easily identified or 
traced to the original owner. 

Designated Resident Assistants will 
have the engraving machine for three 
days. Check the schedule and plan on 
getting your valuables protected. 

Women's Dorms 

Sept. 29 Barness 1st 

Brenda Bower (Rm. 108) 
Oct. 2 Barness 2nd 

Beth Meny (Rm. 212) 
Oct. 6 Berkowitz 1st 

Julie Squier (Rm. 107) 
Oct. 9 Berkowitz 2nd 

Paula Robertson (Rm. 233) 
Oct. 14 Miller Hall 

Darlene Kozlowski (Rm. C-l) 
Oct. 16 Cooke 1st 

Connie Hajioannou (Rm. 108) 

Oct. 20 Cooke 2nd 

Rebecca Crouch (Rm. 202) 

Men's Dorms 

Sept. 29 Work 1st 

Don Billet (Rm. 119) 
Oct. 2 Work 2nd 

Scott Cooper (Rm. 220) 
Oct. 6 Ulman 1st 

Phil Snader (Rm. 107) 
Oct. 9 Ulman 2nd 

Jon Wilson (Rm. 220) 
Oct. 14 Ulman 3rd 

Brian Clapp (Rm. 307) 
Oct. 16 Samuel 1st 

Bill Weller (Rm. 112) 
Oct. 20 Samuel 2nd 

John Stierly (Rm. 226) 
Oct. 23 Goldman 1st 

Tony DeLise (Rm. 113) 
Oct. 23 Elson Hall 

Eric VandenBerghe (Rm. 24) 
Oct. 27 Goldman 2nd 

Andy Hower (Rm. 226) 
Oct. 27 Wolfsohn Hall 

Clair Thompson (Rm. 15) 

Oct. 29 Tabor Campus 

Jim Yeager (R.A. Rm.) 

Resident Assistants should pick up and 

return the engraver to the Residence Life 

Office. 



HELP WANTED! 

$60 per hundred paid 
for remailing letters from home! 

Send self-addressed, 

stamped envelope for 

information/application to: 

ASSOCIATES 
Box 95-B, Roselle. NJ 07203 



From the Library 

The Joseph Krauskopf Memorial Li- 
brary would like to thank the following 
local businesses for contributing to the 
success of our "New Student" Raffle: 
New Britain Inn Rodi's 

Italian Delight Bonanza 

Charlottes Sal's 

Winners of the "Grand Prize Drawing" 
were: 

Christy Rudisill Tim Hayden 

John Jones Erik Rosenquist 

Kevin Zaleski William Green 

Jeffrey A. Beideman Janet Distler 
Joell Pursell Michelle Shirk 

John Kajokowski Edward K. Keiser 
Ann Luno Jay Graham 

Congratulations to all the winners and 
special thanks to Dr. Vincent for drawing 
the winning coupons. 



Have You Ever Thought 
of Graduate School? 

by Dr. Berthold 

During our last Annual Career Day, I 
had the opportunity of spending quite a 
bit of time with Dr. Roger Locandro, the 
Cook (Rutgers Agricultural School) Col- 
lege Dean. During this time, we spoke 
with a number of our students, and I was 
surprised to find that many of our students 
had no concept as to how a graduate edu- 
cation is financed. 

In the case of Liberal Arts majors in- 
cluding those majoring in Business and 
related fields, most students have to 
finance their own graduate education. 
However, many business graduates have 
their graduate educations financed by 
their employers. 

For those students majoring in Agricul- 
ture and in many of the sciences, financing 
a graduate education is frequently a dif- 
ferent matter. Many graduate school 
departments have research assistanceships 
and/or teaching assistanceships available 
for qualified students, and depending 
upon the situation, often a "B" average is 
enough to qualify. Currently at the two 
colleges that I checked, graduate assistants 
are being PAID about $8,000 per year 
and their tuition is waived. In most instan- 
ces, this assistanceship is also tax free. 

Many of the students that Dr. Locan- 
dro and I talked with first said that they 
couldn't financially afford to go on to 
graduate school. However, if you are in- 
terested and if you have the academic 
credentials, you really should look into 
the possibility of attending graduate school. 

Army Offerings 

Army Reserve Programs 

(Programs for Freshmen, Sophomores 
Juniors, and Seniors) 

1. New GI Bill - $140.00/month 

2. Loan Repayment Program — up to 
$10,000.00 

3. Advanced Promotions 

4. Good Starting Pay — $5.00/hr. and 
up 

5. PX Privileges 

6. Full Time Life Insurance 

7. Retirement Credits 

8. Guaranteed Training — over two 
consecutive summers (substitutes for 
work in major) 

9. OCS Programs 

10. Warrant Officer Flight Training 

Regular Army Programs 

(Seniors Only) 

1 . OCS Programs 

2. Hotel and Restaurant Management 

3. Warrant Officer Flight Training 

4. Loan Repayment Program 

5. Army Language Training — 12 
Languages 

6. New GI Bill and Army College Fund 
- $17,000 to $25,000 

7. Cash Bonuses - $2,000 to $8,000 

8. Two Year Enlistment Option 

9. European Enlistment Option 

Office Phone: 348-8914 (24 hours) 
and 348-8915. Address: Doylestown 
Agricultural Works (140 South Main 
Street)'. 

I.C.C. Scholarship 

Applications are now available from 
any I.C.C. representative or the Alumni 
Affairs Office for the I.C.C. scholarship. 
Two awards of $200 will be given to the 
two top choices. Monies will be applied 
to the spring semester bill. Due date for 
applications is November 1 . Please return 
to the Alumni Affairs Office: Mrs. Dolby. 

- FINAL REMINDER - 
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1! 

For all employment time sheets 
and reports of work prior to August 
31, 1986. Turn in all papers and 
reports to the Placement Office 1st 
floor Miller Hall. 



collegiate crossword 




QlnUard Julius Collegiate i'W84-l~ 



ACROSS 

1 Naval academy 

student 
7 Argentine port 

14 Cooking ingredient 

15 Structural peculiar 
ity in horses, etc. 

16 Evaluate 

17 Hot day 

18 Surpass 

19 Most weird 

21 Pitcher's statistic 

22 For fear that 

24 Probability 

25 Mornings 

26 Shot of liquor 

27 Sink the putt 
(2 wds.) 

29 Boundless 
31 Violent woman 

35 Picturesque 

36 Curtis 

37 Financial defense 
mechanism 

38 Miss Colbert 
41 Form a hard 

coating 

43 Groundkeeper's aid 

44 Beat mercilessly 



46 Leveret 

47 Creme creme 

48 Part of BM0C 

49 Surfeit 

51 India 

53 Strengthened by 

heating 
55 Peruvian mammal 

57 Type of clam 

58 New York island 

59 Certain singing 
groups 

60 Most sensible 

DOWN 

1 Defensive ditch 

2 Rudeness 

3 Got rid of 

4 Lady deer 

5 Small map within 
a larger one 

6 To be: Lat. 

7 Moved like a 
hairline 

8 City in Michigan 

9 Spanish painter 

10 Quite old (abbr.) 

11 Sew again 

12 Cool drinks 



Forgetting (continued from page 1) 
the universal tendency to forget new ma- 
terial rapidly at first, more slowly later on. 
Interference theory, which describes how 
new and old learning masks the very facts 
we want to recall, is not an optimistic ap- 
praisal of the learning process. 

Nevertheless, it is possible to learn — 
thoroughly learn — academic material 
Next week will describe the techniques 
that will work to strengthen your memory 
and defeat the processes of forgetting. 

These techniques and systems are 
learning skills. There will be free learning 
skills classes held every Wednesday, third 
period, beginning October 8th in the 
Tutoring Center. For information on these 
and other skills contact Mr. Steve Davis 
at the Tutoring Center, ext. 2309. 



Personals 

To the person or people who stole the 
Berkowitz second mirrors: I hope the 
minor cracks when you look in it. (Re- 
member seven years bad luck.) 

Karen — When it rains, it pours. When 
it's dry, it's as dry as the Sahara! 

WANTED - Male Animal Husbandry 
major seeks one or several female com- 
panions. Must be fun loving and like 
Chinese food. Good looks are not essen- 
tial. Please respond to Box 1275. 

"But John, I'm all wet!" 

Chunka Victims — 

John N. — Everything Sept. 5 

Joan — PS Sept. 3 

The myth is shattered; there's nothing 
under the chapel . . . R.K., L.C., M.D., 
K.V., and Foz from Miller Hall. 



13 Gumbo ingredient 
17 Move sideways 
20 Give support 
23 Certain cocktail 

25 Jock 

26 league 

27 Sound of a drunkard 

28 Like some cars 
30 Way of conducting 

or-esel* 

32 ReDay in injury 

33 Fasci rates 

34 fry 
36 Smal 1 dwelling 

38 Ljnar sights 

39 Gruesome 

40 Befuddled 
42 Ski lodge 

44 French relative 

45 Building wing 

47 Airline company 

48 Part of Einstein's 
equation 

49 Identical 

50 Russian news 
agency 

52 German philosopher 
54 What trenchermen 

can do 
56 Search for gold 

DVC Considers 
Student Chapter 

DVC students have expressed an in- 
terest in forming a student chapter at 
their institution to be included as part of 
Chesapeake NAMA. Dr John Avery 
and four prospective members were guests 
at our September meeting. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: Cooler Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

Area's Best Lunches 11 AM-3 PM 

Happy Hour 4-6:30 PM 

Rt 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



STAFF 

Editors- in-Chief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Artist Monica Etzweiler 

Reporters Janice Behman, Missy 

Brangan. Brett Hart, Judy Henry. Rob 

Hipszer, Kathleen McGough. Melanie 

O'Neill, Cheryl Snyder, Brian Taggart, 

Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry. Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien. 

Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news in the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 



SPORTS WRAP-UP 

^11*2- Up 



LITZKE'S 
SPORTS' BRIEFS 

by John Litzke 

• Mets clinch the Eastern Division. Here 
are the magic numbers of the rest of 
the division leaders as of Sunday, Sep- 
tember 21: 

National: Houston - 5 

American: Boston - 6, California - 7 

• In college football action last Saturday. 
September 20: 

Penn 21, Dartmouth 7 
Oklahoma 63, Minnesota 
(Tomorrow: Oklahoma vs. Miami) 
Michigan St. 20, Notre Dame 15 
USC 17, Baylor 14 
Washington 52, BYU 21 
Alabama 21, Florida 7 
Michian 31, Oregon St. 12 
Pitt 41, Purdue 26 
Clemson 31, Georgia 28 
Penn State 26, Boston College 14 
Temple 38, Florida A&M 17 
(Temple RB Paul Plamer, 202 yds.) 
North Carolina 10, Florida St. 10 
Auburn 45, East Carolina 
Indiana 52, Navy 29 
Iowa St. 64, Indiana St. 9 
Maryland 24, West Virginia 3 
Nevada-Reno 51, Montana 17 
(Nev-Reno QB Eric Beavers, 409 
yds. passing) 
Iowa 52, Northern Illinois 3 

• In other action of interest it was: 
Gettysburg 34, Western Maryland 7 
Franklin & Marshall 44, Ursinus 12 
Muhlenberg 6, Dickinson 
Susquehanna 43, Lycoming 42 
Glassboro St. 13, Frostburg (MD) 10 
Juniata 14, Moravian 13 

Wilkes 17, Upsala 10 
Kutztown 27, Shippensburg 9 

• Baseball's free agent list is out and top- 
ping the list are some pretty big names 
and some pretty big salaries: 

Bob Horner, $1.8 million 
Dave Concepcion. $920,000 



Andre Dawson, $1.1 million 
Tim Raines, $1.8 million 
Reggie Jackson, $975,000 
Steve Carlton, $1.1 million 
Ron Guidry, $975,000 
Mike Easier, $500,000 
Dave Kingman, $600,000 

• Hockey season has begun; still just pre- 
season but the regular season will be 
starting before you know it. 

• Last Sunday in NFL action it was: 
Denver 33, Philadelphia 7 
Atlanta 37, Dallas 35 

(ATL Gerald Riggs, 25 carries, 109 

yds.) 

L.A. Rams 24, Indianapolis 7 

(L.A. Eric Dickerson, 25 carries, 121 

yds.) 

New York Jets 51, Miami 45/OT 

(M. Marino 30 of 50, 448 yds., 6 

TDS; NY. O'Brien 29 of 43, 479 

yds., 4 TDS; Wesley Walker, 6-194, 

4 TDS; Mark Clayton 8 for 174) 

Minnesota 31, Pittsburgh 7 

Buffalo 17, St. Louis 10 

Tampa Bay 24, Detroit 20 

(T.B. Nathan Wonsley, 18 carries, 

138 yds.) 

Kansas City 27, Houston 13 

San Fransisco 26, New Orleans 17 

(S.F. Jeff Kemp, 29 of 44, 332 yds., 

1TD) 

NY. Giants 14, LA. Raiders 9 

Washington 30, San Diego 27 

Seattle 38, New England 31 

(N.E. Tony Eason, 26 of 45, 422 

yds., 3 TDS, Stanley Morgan, 7 for 

161) 

• Sunday's matchup have: 
L.A. Rams vs. Philadelphia 
Chicago vs. Cincinnati 
Detroit vs. Cleveland 
Green Bay vs. Minnesota 
Kansas City vs. Buffalo 
New Orleans vs. N.Y. Giants 
Pittsburgh vs. Houston 

San Fransisco vs. Miami 
Seattle vs. Washington 
N.Y. Jets vs Indianapolis 
San Diego vs. L.A. Raiders 
New England vs. Denver 
Atlanta vs. Tampa Bay 
Monday night 
Dallas vs. St. Louis 

• Don't miss it: the game of the season 
Saturday, 3:30 p.m., channel 6, Okla- 
homa and Jamele Holiway vs. Miami, 
Florida and Vinne Testeverde. 

• Cleveland Cav's sign top pick, Brad 
Daugherty for six years at $5.8 million. 





o 



Athlete of the Week. Lamont Rothmaller 

Athlete of the Week 

On Saturday, running back Lamont 
Rothmaller, a 5-11. 165 pound junior, 
caught two passes for 128 yards in DVC's 
31-0 victory over Albright. Lamont's se- 
cond reception went for 96 yards and a 
touchdown which set all-time DVC rec- 
ords in longest touchdown and longest 
completion, for this reason Lamont has 
been selected athlete of the week. He is a 
business major from Cardinal Dougherty 
H.S. in Philadelphia. Congratulations! 



Sports Quiz 

QUESTION *3: 

In August 1 978 Pete Rose was with 
the Cincinnati Reds and shooting at 
Joe DiMagglo's 56 consecutive 
game hitting streak. Pete fell short 
of DiMagglo's record but he tied the 
National League record. Whose rec- 
ord did he tie and how many games 
did his hitting streak last? 

If you think you have the right answer; 
place it with your name and box * in the 
sports trivia box at the end of the line in 
Caesar's Pub Snack Bar and win a free 
meal. 

No one got Question *1: Who is the 
only major league baseball player to win 
MVP in both American and National 
leagues? Answer: Frank Robinson with 
Cincinnati and Baltimore. 



DVC cross country was victorious over Wilkes 
but fell to Kings last Saturday 

Photo/Dave Spotts 

Cross Country Update 

Off came the sweats, as the runners 
made their way to the starting line. The 
weather was hot and sticky on Saturday 
afternoon and the battle between the three 
teams would prove to be the same way. 
The runners became poised at the starting 
line awaiting the sound of the starting gun. 

All three cross country teams, DVC, 
Wilkes, and Kings, were evenly matched 
at the start of the race. As the runners 
made their way out of the stadium, DVC 
jumped into the early lead with Dave 
Spotts and Jim Enoch grabbing the one- 
two positions; however, as the race pro- 
gressed so did the members of the Kings' 



team on the front runners. By mid way 
through the race, Jim Enoch dropped 
back to fourth place with a Wilkes' and 
Kings' man between him and the first 
place runner, Dave Spotts. 

As the race finished the order of the first 
four runners remained the same. Dave 
Spotts won the race over the 5.2 mile 
course in a time of 29:03 with Jim Enoch 
finishing fourth with a time of 31:09. 
Wilkes' first man captured second place 
while Kings' first man was able to take 
third place. Behind Spotts and Enoch 
came a strong performance by the rest of 
DVC's team. Gary Kampmeyer finished 
in 10th place (32:39) with John Thomp- 
son right behind him in 1 1th place (32:46) . 
Tony Donofrio. Bill Broshy and Sean 
Miller finished 13th, 14th, and 15th 
respectively while Pete Rossi battled with 
the hot weather and was able to finish in 
20th place. 

The team ended up splitting the triangu- 
lar meet between the other two teams. 
DVC won 22 *o 39 (low score wins in 
cross country) against Wilkes but lost 32 
to 24 against a much improved Kings' 
team. 

The team wiH run against Susquehanna, 
Widenei. Moravian, and Spring Garden 
on Saturday during half time at the foot- 
ball game. 




Coach Pam Spotts (with clipboard) discusses strategy during practice session. 

Field Hockey Trounces 
Gwenydd-Mercy, Immaculata 

Ladies Blanked 
by Muhlenberg 

by John Litzke 

Fitness Guru, Pat Croce would not 
have been proud of the way Gwenydd- 
Mercy played in their opening contest vs. 
our Lady Aggies. "They just weren't in 
shape," commented senior defenseman 
Beth Kan*. DVC received two goals each 
from co-captain Lisa Long and Tracy Mar- 
shall and one from the other co-captain, 
Tina Drey as DVC beat Gwenydd-Mercy 
5-1. "We played a strong game, our all- 
around offense was good and when they 
(Gwenydd-Mercy) got the ball into our 
end we got it out right away," said Karr. 

Their successes fell to the wayside, at 
least for the time being, as the hockey 





Co-captain Tina Drey, who scored a goal in the 
Gwynedd-Mercy match a week ago. is an inte- 
gral part of both the offense and defense. 



Fullback Dee Pisauro and halfback Deb Masculli 
battle in practice. 

team took on a strong Muhlenberg squad 
and were shut out 5-0 putting'the Ladies 
at even .500. 

Monday evening DVC coasted to their 
second win in three outings beating the 
skirts off Immaculata in a 3-0 shutout. 
The scoring for the day's game was pro- 
vided by left wing Dee Pisauro on a fine 
play and Lisa Long had a duplex to give 
her four goals in three games. 

DVC seemed to control the play and 
tempo throughout the game although 
there were a few anxious moments 
towards the end . "I am very happy with 
the way we played today," commented 
Coach Pam Sports. "We learned a lot 
about our game on Friday (5-0 loss to 
Muhlenberg) , we worked hard in practice 
the last two days and a lot of the "bugs" 
were worked out," finished Spotts. 

They will go for their third and fourth 
wins this week when they will take on 
Moravian (A) Thursday, September 25 
and Wilkes (H) tomorrow. 




DVC Wins Big in Home Opener, 31-0 



Albright during pregame: Little did they know 
. . . little did they know. 

by John Litzke 

Back in the days of ancient Macedonia 
(September 20, 356 B.C. to be exact) 
there was born a King and he would later 
be called, thanks to extensive press cover- 
age, Alexander the Great. A bizarre and 
savage society was directed by Alexander 
and he and his tribes beat up on neighbor- 
ing lands like Egypt and Asia Minor and 
he became a real celebrity. 

But this was September 20, 1986 (al- 
most 2000 years later) and DVC did 
some heavy "beating up upon" on their 
own. 

Last Saturday, a neighboring land called 
Albright College visited DVC (the great), 
the battle began, and it was over before 
you could say "Mesopotamia." 

The entire DVC army played a role in 
the 31-0 shutout victory over the Lions 
increasing DVC's winning streak over 
Albright to nine. Let's go right to the 
scoring and it was all DVC. On their third 
possession in quarter number one, full- 
back Joe Bello (16 carries, 56 yards) 
powered the ball in the endzone from 
two yards out at 1:04 of the quarter and 
a John Fox extra point gave DVC the 7-0 
lead. The big plays of the drive came on 
a fine 13-yard reception by wide receiver 
Bob Kennedy (3 receptions, 48 yards, 
15.3 avg.) and some eight and nine-yard 
gains by Bello. Drive number one went 
for 51 yards on 11 plays. Scoring drive 
number two took eight plays and with 
just :52 until halftime culminating with a 
26-yard field goal by John Ford who col- 
lected seven points. John is handling the 
kicking duties like a seasoned veteran. 
The half ended with DVC ahead ten zip. 

At 2:02 of the third quarter, halfback 
Jimmy Wilson took it in from one-yard 
out and the kick made it 17-0. The offen- 
sive series started thanks to the defense 
when linebacker Vince Bedesem inter- 
cepted a Matt Asplundh pass and returned 



This Week in Soccer 

The DVC kickers faced two tough 
MAC teams and played rough battle in 
both. On Thursday, they encountered a 
good Swarthmore team and lost 2-0. 
The Aggies played a good first half but 
came up short in the second. On Satur- 
day, they faced Drew, another good 
MAC team and fought a tough 1-0 battle. 

This week the Aggies face Muhlenberg 
on Wednesday and Widener on Satur- 
day. The kickers need your support, 
both games are at home, so let's get out 
there. 




it to the DVC 49-yard line. On the follow- 
ing play, Wilson ran around left end and 
darted down the side line for a sure 
touchdown but the referee ruled he was 
knocked out of bounds just short of the 
goal line. 



and hit Junior Lamont Rothmaller with a 
strike, Lamont juked, the defensive back 
went tumbling and all he could see in front 
of him was pasture. Rothmaller bolted 
96 yards for the touchdown setting new 
DVC records for longest touchdown and 




Preparing for a grid- iron confrontation 



As we head into the fourth quarter we 
see DVC dominating. At 14:45 quarter- 
back Walt Kobryznski (4 of 8 for 78 yds.) 
found John Sukeena in the corner of the 
endzone for a touchdown strike and the 
extra point made it 24-0 capping a two- 
play, 32-yard drive. 

Then came the play of the day. With 
8:23 left in the fourth quarter, DVC was 
pinned inside their own 5 yard line, quar- 
terback Andy Hower faded back to pass 



longest completion . The Ford kick made 
the score 31-0 and that's when Albright 
said" "uncle." 

This story wouldn't be complete with- 
out talking about the Aggie defense. 
Albright's offense threatened a few times 
inside the DVC 20 and inside the DVC 5 
but the "D" stood tall and held them on 
fourth down on each occasion. Three of 
the outstanding plays that stand out in 
my mind were the goal-line stand in the 




The "D" dominated 




ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIP 

Friends of The Frelinghuysen Arbore- 
tum, an affiliate of Morris County Park 
Commission, invites New Jersey resi- 
dents majoring in horticulture, botany, 
landscape architecture or a related field 
to apply for their Annual Scholarship. 
Application forms are available from: 
The Financial Aid Office or Scholar- 
ship Chairman, Friends of the Freling- 
huysen Arboretum, P.O. Box 1295R, 
Morristown, NJ 07960. Completed ap- 
plications are due November 25, 1986. 



Forward Alex Simpson knocks one past Ogontz 
keeper as Burger and Wagner rush the goal 



Winger Bill Burger crosses ball as Ogontz de- 
fender looks bad 

Intramural Football Update: 

BOYLE'S LEAD E.M.O. 

E.M.O. beat Bob's Boys 38-6. E.M.O. 
was led by quarterback Chris "Heisman 
Hopeful" Boyle who ran for three touch- 
downs and threw for two more. Also 
scoring for E.M.O. was Tim Brennon 
and Shaun "Big Red" Magrath. Bob's 
Boys touchdown was scored by Mike 
Zendt on a pass from fleet footed Shaun 
Smith. E.M.O.'s tenatious defense was 
led by Bill Boyle (two interceptions) , Vin- 
ny Pastore (one interception) and Mark 
"Cy" Rother also with one interception. 
E.M.O. is coached by Tim "Mastermind" 
Brennon. 



a 



BENEFIT CONCERT 
for 



GEORGE BUTERA 

*& REHABILITATION FUND 




smash tapS^ 

PALACE * 

ADDED ATTRACTION* 
THE FLAM1N- COMEDIAN 

CAUCASIAN* CRAIG SHOEMAKER 

SUNDAY AFTERNOON 

SEPT. 28, 1986 i 

DOORS OPEN 12 NOON 

SHOWTIME 1PM Till DUSK 




JB *(?!) 1 S Si 11 WLL HAi<> AMIHKrtH 

iTK MVHMAWft HAflflAftti wvvAMAMRs i t Mi* CITY 

ISSfiWCTTY tX*£T A£***t> tlNTHLlb A r« Kf ' IAK K'Wn I (in Ut# 



fourth quarter to preserve the shutout in 
which you credit the entire defensive 
unit, the outstanding breakup of a pass 
by senior cornerback Mike Williams early 
in the second half and the crunching sack 
by right side linebacker Greg Currie for a 
12-yard loss. 

Senior linebacker Vince Bedesem col- 
lected two interceptions, and cornerback 
John Zellers and linebacker Jeff White 
had one apiece. 

DVC led in just about every statistical 
aspect of the game including passing 
yards (212-180), average gain per play 
(5.5-3. 1 yds.) and total yards (352-230) . 

For Albright, quarterbacks Mike 
Crovetti and Matt Asplundh were eight 
for 19, 83 yds. and seven of 10, 73 yds. 
respectively and the leading rusher for 
the Lions was junior Matt Pammer with 
40 yds. on 12 carries. 

Homecoming comes early this year 
and we will celebrate it Saturday, Sept. 
27 as we face the tough Susquehanna 
Crusaders who knocked off Lycoming 
last week 43-42. Our overall record vs. 
Susquehanna is 13-13-0. Let's make this 
weekend a successful one 



± A. / 1 




IIIIIIIIIIIIJJ^illltllUllillllullllllllllllllUlJBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 





Fall 1986 
Landscape Nursery Club 
CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

September 

20 Plant Sale at football game. 

22 Meeting in Student Government 
room, 6:30 p.m. 

23 Rock Garden Preparation, 6 p.m. 

26 Final Float Preparation after pep 
rally. 

27 Plant Sale/Cookout at football 
game, 12 p.m. 

29 Rock Garden PLANTING!!, 6 p.m. 

October 

4 Meadow Brook Garden Tour (time 
to be announced) . 

6 Meeting, 6:15 p.m.* * 
14 Flower Time (garden center chain) 
Pizza Party. 

18 Last Plant Sale at football game. 

19 Field Trip (to be announced) . 

20 Meeting, 6:15 p.m.** 

29 Chase Rosade Bonsai Expert, 7 
p.m. 

November 

3 Meeting, 6:15 p.m.* * 

5 Chase Rosade Workshop, 7 p.m. 
(must have attended Oct. 29 
lecture) . 

17 Meeting, 6:15 p.m.* * 

December 

8 Meeting/Christmas Party? 

* 'Guest speakers 



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Answer to this week's 
Collegiate Crossword. 






iMaDRj^oms^sinn®^ ©©nn^® 



Vol. XXI. No. 5 
Friday. October 3. 1986 




NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



New School Store 
Means Good Business 

by Ann Whitesell 

Anyone on campus who had seen the 
student store prior to January 1986 can 
understand the curiosity of this reporter 
for the behind-the-scenes action taking 
place in the student store. To get the 
latest on all the commotion I had to peg 
down Seth Friedman, the store's new 
manager, at 4 p.m.. after a long day of 
planning, promoting, and selling. The 
following is an excerpt of that interview: 

RAM PAGES: Where did you receive 
your college education? 
SETH: I received my degree from East 
Stroudsburg State (now called East 
Stroudsburg University). 1 majored in 
Political Science. 

RAM PAGES: How did you get started 
in retailing with a degree in Poli Sci? 
SETH: I worked in the school store at 
E.S.U. during my four years there. When 
I finished school. East Stroudsburg of- 
fered me the assistant manager's position 
at the store. 

RAM PAGES: Do you have any other 
retailing experience? 
SETH: I worked for six years in a com- 
pany called Edison Brothers, a division 
of the Mall Retail Company. Mall Retail 
Company is the fifth largest retail com- 
pany in the U.S. Mall Retail Company 
owns stores like Bakers. 5-7-9 shops, 
and the Wild Pair, just to mention a few. 
RAM PAGES: How did you come across 
the DVC school store job? 
SETH: I moved back north to be near 
my family and I was looking through the 
paper when I saw the ad for a store 
manager at DVC. When everyone was 
interviewing for the job, Dean Tasker 
said I was the most qualified. Here I am. 
I looked around the back office. Desk 
piled high in an orderly mess, coffee pot 
low. and a man twitching one foot and 
smoking a cigarette. Maybe this scene 
sums it all up. Seth Friedman has learned 
that to make a store work, you always 
have to be on the go. More importantly 
though, he is constantly out on the store 
floor intermingling with the student 
customers. 

RAM PAGES: You have made some 
drastic changes to the store since January. 
Why? 

SETH: When I came into the store I cre- 
ated four categories: 1. Greeting Cards 
and related items; 2. Fashion; 3. Snack 
i Foods; 4. Standard School Supplies. 
The first two categories were lacking the 
most — yet these two points can make 
or break a school store. The old clothing 
we sold at low or below cost so that I could 
bring in new fashions that would sell. 
Also, with the greeting card category, I 
expanded to include cards, magazines, 
wrapping paper, calendars, and other 
novelties students were looking for. The 
snack food category was improved upon 
by test marketing a new product. 
RAM PAGES: Are you saying you relied 
on the students' opinions to turn the 
store around? 

SETH: In a sense, yes. The student is 
our main customer, so you have to draw 



on what sells to them by listening to what 
they have to say, what they are looking 
for, and most importantly, what they can 
afford. As a retailer, you always have to 
be price competitive. 
RAM PAGES: What do you plan on do- 
ing next semester? 

SETH: Looking ahead, I would like to 
expand into the conference room (next 
door), but first I must prove to certain 
people on campus that I am capable of 
running the store in the black. 
RAM PAGES: Are you saying the school 
store might be able to turn a profit for the 
school? 

SETH: Sometimes "profit" is a dirty word, 
but profit used as a good thing, such as 
keeping the students' tuition down, im- 
proving dormitories, or for maintaining 
grounds and farms, I am all for it. I believe 
that, with a little bit of back investment 
into the store, there is good cause to be- 
lieve in a chance for improvement on the 
Delaware Valley campus. 

Your Input into the Selection 

of DVC's New President 

is Solicited 

The campus members of the Presiden- 
tial Search Committee are actively seeking 
your input into this important selection 
process. Forms have been distributed to 
students, staff, administration and faculty. 
If you have not received your form, please 
contact R. Boltz, C. Hill, or D. Blumen- 
field. This is your chance to make your 
feelings known. This feedback is requested 
by October 10. 1986 so please don't 
delay! 

Homecoming Drizzle . . . 

by Missy Brangan 

Homecoming started Friday night at 
the pep rally with Bruno '20 cheering on 
the crowd. The homecoming queen was 
Brenda Werner representing the Horticul- 
ture Club. Her court consisted of Deb 
Pomroy of Pi Alpha Xi and Deb Osterling 
of Block and Bridle. 

Saturday morning it rained on our pa- 
rade but our clubs stilled showed some 
great floats through Doylestown. Block 
and Bridle won the float competition with 
a float showing the most animation. 
Biology Club was second with their float 
of a sea scene and Dairy Society was a 
strong thrid with their giant cow. 

Otherwise it was a wet and rainy week- 
end. Next year let's have homecoming in 
the late fall so everyone can get more in 
the spirit. 

ATTENTION 

There is a garden tour to Meadowbrook 
Farm Garden Center/ Estate sponsored 
by the Landscape Nursery Club on Satur- 
day, October 4th. Those interested should 
meet at the security building at 10:00 
a.m. We will be car pooling so if you can 
drive it is greatly apprecited. 

If you plan to go, please sign up at Mr. 
Ray's office or contact Jerry Fritz or Amy 
Clayton. 

This tour is free to members and a small 
fee will be charged for non -members. 




DVC 

Sponsors Technology 

Lecture Series 

by W.H.R. 

In response to a need perceived by 
DVC faculty to expose themselves and 
students to facts and opinions relative to 
the professions in agriculture, science, 
and business, a series of five lectures on 
"Technology: Implications for the Future" 
has been scheduled for the current school 
year. Each will be held in the A.P.R. at 
7:30 p.m. 

Lecture i Implications of New Tech- 
nology for International Agriculture fea- 
tured Dr. Robert A. Godke of Louisiana 
State University's Animal Science Depart- 
ment, last Monday. Dr. Godke spoke 
about the effective use of the U.S. educa- 
tional and research network in creating 
self-help programs to improve impover- 
ished nations, as opposed to government- 
sponsored programs which rely on dis- 
pensing technology. 

Lecture II Promises and Problems in 
Genetic Engineering will be held Wednes- 
day, October 22, and will feature Dr. 
Alfred F. McFee of the Medical and Health 
Sciences Division of Oak Ridge Associated 
Universities. He will discuss several of the 
legal and moral implications which have 
and may crop up in the rapidly develop- 
ing field of genetic manipulation, a field 
which offers the best biological potential 
for benefitting mankind. 
Lecture III A Philosopher Looks at Tech- 
nological Culture set for Wednesday, 
November 19, will be moderated by Dr. 
John D. Caputo, a philosophy teacher at 
Villanova. Dr. Caputo will bring a human- 
istic perspective to this extraordinary ex- 
pansion of technology by studying its ef- 
fects on our understanding of the human 
self, of art, of truth, and of the traditional 
meaning of humanities, and will compare 
modern technology versus traditional 
craftsmanship. 

Lecture IV Technology: Tool for the 
Small Business is to be held Monday, 
March 2, 1987. Walter Conti, owner of 
Conti's Cross Keys Inn, will speak of tech- 
nology as tool and as barrier to personal- 
ized service for small businesses in our in- 
creasingly service-oriented economy. 

Lecture V Impact of Technology on 
U.S. Agriculture Policy will be held 
Wednesday, April 8, 1987. The qualified 
speaker will discuss the need for educa- 
tion concerning the costs and benefits of 
new developments which have increased 
productivity of U.S. farms changing farm 
size, ownership, and employment, in 
light of the increasing involvement of the 
non-agricultural public in decisions affect- 
ing agriculture. Lecture V will conclude 
the lecture series. 



DVC Grads Honored at 

International Horticulture 

Meeting in California 

Approximately twenty-five DVC grad- 
uates, including president Dr. Joshua 
Feldstein, recently attended the Ameri- 
can Society for Horticultural Science 
83rd annual meeting and International 
Horticultural Congress held at the 
University of California at Davis. They 
were among almost 2800 scientists from 
all over the world who came to discuss 
issues pertaining to horticulture. 

William L. George, class of 1960, was 
elected a fellow for the American Society 
for Horticultural Science for his "outstand- 
ing research on the genetic expression, 
and physiology of sexuality and growth 
habits in cucumber and the parthenocarpy 
of tomato. Dr George was also recognized 
for his research in the development of 
germplasm in vegetable crops, and in 
breeding of greenhouse tomatoes. 

Dr. George is currently a professor of 
horticulture, associate dean, and director 
of resident instruction at the University of 
Illinois College of Agriculture. For this 
work he was also honored. 

Dr. Walter Kender, class of '57. director 
of the largest citrus research center in the 
world, was previously elected a fellow of 
the ASHS. 



This Week on 
Campus 

Wendy L. Unger 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3 

if AH night movies at Caesar's Pub (ends it 
3:00 a.m.) 

SATURDAY. OCTOBER 4 

■# Football (A) Moravian 2 p.m. ifr 

Soccer (A) Albright 1:30 p.m. 
FteW Hockey <A) Cabrini 10:30 a.m. 

* Cross County (A) Swarthmore 2 p.m. ^ 
VoHeybaK (A) Attentown 1 p.m 

SUNDAY. OCTOBER 5 

83 more days until Christmas 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 6 

+ Soccer (A) Cabrini 3:30 p.m 
VoDeybal (A) Arvernia 7 p.m. 

TUESDAY. OCTOBER 7 

it 

9 p.m. 

Held Hockey (H) Wesley 4 p.m 

* WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER S 

Vofeybafl (H) Widener 7 p.m 

THURSDAY. OCTOBER 9 

Soccer (A) Beaver 3:K) p.m. 



i.tn. * 





Dear Editors 

Dear Editors, 

On September 25 between 5:30 p.m. 
and 9:30 p.m. someone took the privilege 
of walking across my '86 car. My car was 
extensively damaged. This person stepped 
up on my rear bumper, climbed on the 
roof and walked across my roof and hood. 
The bumper is damaged, the roof and 
hood are dented and scratched. I was later 
informed that this type of thing has oc- 
curred before, especially near holidays 
and vacations. I urge other car owners to 
be careful. 
$ $ $ REWARD $ $ $ 

For any information leading to the ar- 
rest and conviction of the person respon- 
sible for the damage of my car on Septem- 
ber 25 between 5:30 and 9:30 p.m. 

To the person responsible for the dam- 
ages: 

"Be sure of this: 

the wicked will not go unpunished." 
Proverbs 11:21 (NIV) 

Any information on this incident may 
be forwarded to Box 988. 



COMMENCEMENT: 
Where and Why 

Dear Editors, 

Last spring I stayed after finals were 
over to watch the seniors graduate and 
receive their bachelor of science degrees 
while their families and friends cheered 
them on. Proud parents watched their 
sons and daughters walk across the plat- 
form and receive greetings from Dr. Feld- 
stein and the respective department chair- 
man, while at that same moment a special 
part of all their lives was becoming a 
memory. 

Those of us who have stuck it out at 
DVC, putting in all the hard work, look 
forward to this day as our last gleaming 
moment on DVC campus. We would 
expect the college to do everything it 
could to make it an enjoyable and spec- 
tacular day. However, this does not seem 
to be the case. 

To begin, most people would expect 
commencement to be held in a location 
intended for spectator events, i.e. an audi- 
torium, a gymnasium, a stadium, or even 
an All-Purpose Room. Not so at DVC. 
This institution holds commencement 
exercises on a grassy incline with rented 
folding chairs. Secondly, the stage is not 
placed at the base of the incline as a thea- 
tre would have it but instead it is at the top 
of the slope so you get a lovely view of 
the back of the head of the person in the 
chair in front of you. Next, the graduates- 
to-be are paraded through two aisles in 
the rented folding chairs and are seated 
in front of the audience. Unless your fam- 
ily is lucky enough to be sitting on your 
aisle they probably won't get to see you 
again until your name is called and you 
walk across the platform, nearly an hour 
later. A fourth, more unusual aspect: why 
are we renting chairs anyway? Does this 
school have money to burn or am I mis 
taken about our tight budget? Why not 
use a facility with seating already avail- 
able? Fifth, sitting in the sun with no re- 
freshments or comfort facilities can be a 
problem, to say the least. Next, the walk 
from the parking lot to the field in front of 
Segal Hall isn't much for me but it's a long 
haul for my mother and I'm sure many 
others would concur. Sixth, there is no 
public address system at this field so one 
has to be constructed each year as well 
as a videotape platform for Mr. Tobachnik 
to use. And finally, at least for now, I am 
not aware of any historic or traditional 
reason for the graduation to be held there, 
and if there is a special reason, none of 
the spectators there were told about the 
significance, so it is going unnoticed. 

It is easy to make a criticism; the hard 
part is suggesting a workable alternative 



Our From Under 
The Editors' Desk: 

Dear Readers, 

Last weekend, one of the big DVC 
events. Homecoming, took place. Earlier 
that week, many students prepared their 
part in that weekend, designing floats, 
building floats, lettering banners, training 
voices, "jamming" for the Band, and 
practicing for the big games planned for 
Saturday. When the big weekend came 
around, the storm patterns out west did, 
too, and we had one of the wettest home- 
comings on record. 

Though the rain may not have damp- 
ened the spirits of weekend revelers, we 
at Ram Pages are still feeling as if this 
newspaper has become another victim of 
that dreaded school affliction we were 
talking about so much only a few years 
ago at DVC — student apathy. The 
Homecoming issue of Ram Pages is a 
case in point. 

Our dedicated handful of writers, pho- 
tographers, and editors has dwindled, 
and we think it is showing in the selection 
of stories we print each week. Ram Pages 
staff really enjoys running around looking 
for stories, writing them up, and getting 
together Monday nights to put it all toge- 
ther and to decide what's needed for the 
following week's issue. However, we need 
a lot more input from you, about your 
campus activities, your classmates, your 
teachers, and your administrators; there's 
nothing worse than seeing a big story 
about the college administration in a local 
paper — and not even mentioned to Ram 
Pages, for DVC's own students to read. 

We want you to know what is going 
on around DVC that could affect you as 
a student (paying good money for a col- 
lege education) . We want others to know 
about the accomplishments of our fellow 
students. In this way you can show why 
we chose Delaware Valley College. Show 
some of that spirit! Just drop us a line at 
P.O. Box 988. 



James Work Memorial Stadium is a 
structure designed for spectator events, 
with a public address system of its own. 
and a place for video taping already con- 
structed. The seating is designed to allow 
each person a clear view of the happen- 
ings on the field. A concession stand and 
rest rooms are at the site as well as easy 
access to and from the parking lot. The 
graduates-to-be could be paraded into 
the stadium on the track, giving friends 
and family time to cheer and wave. Only 
a fraction of the free standing chairs would 
be needed for the seniors and the faculty 
and they could come from the APR 
which could reduce the expense to the 
college. 

Giving the school another opportunity 
to use the stadium has to help justify its 
construction. I would even go so far as to 
say that Coach Wilson's support should 
be expected; after all, the stadium is for 
the entire student body, not just its ath- 
letes. I can see only benefits from this 
possibility and encourage its implemen- 
tation whole-heartedly. 

Sincerely. 

Bill Moller. senior 



DVC Summer Livestock Exhibitions Results 



ACROSS 

1 Amulet 

6 Glass bottle 

11 Skull 

13 Station 

15 Emit rays 

16 Making sense 

17 Tally 

18 Libraries and banks 

20 Wood sorrel 

21 gin 

23 Item for Julia 
Child 

24 Type of cheese 

25 Prefix for gram or 
graph 

27 "A Majority of ' 

28 La Scala offering 

29 Roasting pin 
31 Withstands 



The Animal Husbandry Department 
has exhibited sheep and cattle at several 
shows this summer. The livestock were 
fitted and shown by Delaware Valley stu- 
dents. The results of the show are as 
follows: 

July 28, 1986 - Goshen Fair 
West Chester, PA 

Dorsets 

1st & 3rd place Ram Lamb 

Champion Ram 

1st & 2nd Yearling Ewe 

1st, 3rd & 4th Ewe Lamb 

Champion Ewe & 

Reserve Champion Ewe 

1st Pair of Ram Lambs 

1st Pair of Ewe Lambs 

1st Pen of Lamb 

1st Breeders Young Flock 

1st Flock 

1st Get of Sire 

Hampshires 

1st & 4th Yearling Ewe 
Champion Ewe 

August 9, 1986 
Sussex County Fair 

Sussex, NJ 

2nd & 6th Market Lambs (out of 30) 

August 15, 1986 
Middletown Grange Fair 

Wrightstown, PA 

Market Lambs 

5th light weight 
3rd medium weight 

Dorsets 

1st & 2nd Spring Ram Lamb 

Champion Ram 

5th Aged Ewe 

3rd & 4th Yearling Ewe 

1st Fall Ewe Lamb 

1st, 3rd & 4th Spring Ewe Lamb 

Reserve Champion Ewe with 

Spring Ewe Lamb 

2nd Pen of Lambs 

1st Breeders Young Flock 

1st Get of Sire 

Hampshires 

1st Ram Lamb 

Champion Ram 

1st Aged Ewe 

3rd. 4th & 5th Yearling Ewe 



3rd, 4th & 5th Spring Ewe Lambs 

2nd Pen of Lambs 

1st Get of Sire 

Champion Ram over all breeds with 

our Dorset Spring Lamb 

August 16, 1986 

The fall-born Polled Hereford heifers 
were shown at the Warren County, New 
Jersey Open Show with the following 
results: 

1st Winter Heifer Calf 

1st Senior Heifer Calf 

Heifer Calf Champion with 

Winter Heifer Calf 

Reserve Heifer Calf Champion with 

the Senior Heifer Calf 



And More 
Livestock News . . . 

The Livestock Judging Team competed 
at the Eastern States Exposition Livestock 
Judging Contest on September 13, 1986. 
Twelve class of livestock were judged 
and six sets of oral reasons were given by 
each contestent. There were four colle- 
giate teams competing; Cobbleskill. Uni- 
versity of Connecticut. Penn State Uni- 
versity, and Delaware Valley College. 

The results are the following: 

Swine Judging 

Deb Oesterlir*.] — 1st place individual 

Beth Meny & Bob Breidis — 

Tie for 6th place individual 

DVC — 1st place team 

Sheep Judging 

Lisa Roerig — tied 5th place individual 

Deb Oesterling — 7th place individual 

Allison Bakos — 8th place individual 

DVC — 2nd place team 

Beef Cattle 

Deb Oesterling — 10th high individual 
DVC — 3rd place team 

Reasons 

Deb Oesterling — 7th high individual 
Lisa Roerig — 9th high individual 

Overall 

Deb Oesterling — 2nd high individual 

Lisa Roerig — 10th high individual 

DVC — 2nd place high team 



collegiate crossword 



33 Accelerate 

34 Sot's ailment, for 
short 

35 Wrench 
39 Morons 

42 Units of verse 
measurement 

43 Bungle 
45 Accustom 

47 Actor Jannings 

48 Arose 

50 Spanish river 

51 Records, for short 

52 Graduates 

54 Storage place 

55 Adding machine, for 
one 

57 Art product 
59 Improve in 
appearance 




©Edward Julius Collegiate (W84-18 



60 Puts a picture up 
again 

61 French legislative 
body 

62 Johnny Mercer's 
subject 

DOWN 

1 Baby beds 

2 Food fish 

3 Black cuckoo 

4 Money of Iran 

5 Muffles 



6 Task 

7 Joplin pieces 

8 Prefix for cycle 

9 Works with secret 
messages 

10 Afternoon server 
(2 wds.) 

11 1929 occurrence 

12 Adviser 

13 Ingenious 

14 Relatives of the 
camel 

19 Corleone 

22 Everlasting 



24 Incident 

26 Buck 

28 Rome's ancient port 

30 "All About " 

32 Mr. Byrnes 

35 Refines metal 

36 Majorette's items 

37 Barley's beards 

38 Tennis play 

39 Presser 

40 Labeling 

41 Hot , Arkansas 

44 Like Caesar (abbr 
46 Ice device 



48 Driving hazard 

49 Tropical fruit 

52 Calgary's province 
(abbr.) 

53 Reverberate 
56 Scottish tree 
58 Chinese dynasty 



) 



SPORTS WRAP-UP 



DVC Goes 1-3 Over 
Homecoming Weekend 




SpoRt 



^iA2-UP 



LITZKE'S 
SPORTS' BRIEFS 

by John Litzke 

•Well, the playoffs are set: New York 
vs. Houston in the National League 
and Boston vs. California in the Ameri- 
can League. The battle for second place 
is about over as the Phillies have a five 
game cushion on third place St. Louis. 
Noteworthy — Houston pitcher Mike 
Scott throws a no-hitter at San Fransi- 
sco the same night the Astors clinched 
the west. The Mets better not take them 
too lightly. For what it's worth — the 
Phillies have leaders or are among the 
leaders in every statistical category but 
one (strikeouts by a pitcher) and have 
probably the strongest candidate for 
most valuable player in Michael Jack 
Schmidt. 

• In College football week *4 it was: 
Miami. Florida 28, Oklahoma 16 
Auburn 38, Tennessee 8 

BYU 27. Temple 17 
Notre Dame 41, Purdue 9 
Ohio State 64, Utah 6 
Nebraska 48, Oregon 14 
Iowa 69, Texas El-Paso 7 
Penn State 42, East Carolina 14 
Michigan 20, Florida State 18 
Alfred 69, Rampopo 
Pitt 48, West Virginia 16 

• In College football games of interest it 
was: 

Juniata 24, Widener 9 
Gettysburg 47, Swarthmore 
Ursinus 13, Western Maryland 
Frank. & Marshall 30. Muhlenberg 20 
Moravian 21, Lebanon Valley 6 
Albright 14, Upsala 7 
Lycoming 14, Wilkes 7 
Navy 41, Lehigh 

• In College soccer last weekend it was: 
Cornell 4, Penn 3 

Drew 1, Ursinus 1 
Haverford 4, Catholic 
Rutgers 8, Bucknell 
Lehigh 3, Delaware 2 
Towson St. 1, Drexel 
Villanova 5, Bloomsburg 1 
Seton Hall 1, Temple 

• There's absolutely no interest at all in 
Doug Flutie as a quarterback in the 
NFL. Doug can now be seen in the new 
motion picture, Over the Rainbow II 
starring Billy Barty, Marty the Munch- 
kin, Herve "Hope you get hit by de 
plane" Villecheze, and the whole crew 
from the land of Oz. 

• Sixers sign 6-11, 230 pound Pi votman 
Jerome Henderson. Henderson aver- 
aged eight points with the Rochester 
Zeniths and is a capable shot blocker. 



• In high school football action last week 
and last weekend it was: 
Frankford 48, Overbrook 

Gratz 14, University City 
Mastbaum 24, Edison 
Lincoln 20, West Philadelphia 20 
ML. King 20. Roxborough 14 
Northeast 20, Bok 2 
Bartram 20, Olney 16 
Washington 21, Dobbins 
Chestnut Hill 21. Franklin 8 
West Catholic 20, Roman Catholic 6 
Penn Wood 14. Episcopal 
Archbishop Kennedy 37, Harriton 
Norristown 20. Pennsbury 8 
Council Rock 14. North Penn7 
Abington 18, Neshaminy 13 
Pennridge 14, Truman 3 
C.B. West 27; William Tennent 7 
Quakertown 8. Wissahickon 
C.B. East 20. Bensalem 6 

• In week *4 of the NFL season it was: 
Philadelphia 34. LA. Rams 20 

San Fransisco 31. Miami 16 
Washington 19. Seattle 14 
Chicago 44, Cincinnati 7 
Cleveland 24. Detroit 21 
Kansas City 20. Buffalo 17 
NY. Giants 20. New Orleans 17 
Minnesota 42. Green Bay 7 
LA. Raiders 17, San Diego 13 
Denver 27. New England 20 
NY. Jets 26. Indianapolis 7 
Atlanta 23. Tampa Bay 20 
Monday Night: 
Dallas 31. St. Louis 7 

• Week *5 will find: 
Philadelphia at Atlanta 
Cincinnati at Green Bay 
Cleveland at Pittsburgh 
Houston at Detroit 

LA. Raiders at Kansas City 
Miami at New England 
Minnesota at Chicago 
NY. Giants at St. Louis 
Washington at New Orleans 
Tampa Bay at LA. Rams 
Dallas at Denver 
Buffalo at NY. Jets 
Indianapolis at San Fransisco 
Monday Night: 
San Diego at Seattle 

• Parapeligic's bid to swim English Chan- 
nel fails: Jim McGowan. 54 of Fort 
Washington, PA and paralyzed from 
the waist down fell victim to the choppy 
and cold waters of the 22 mile long 
English Channel. Very few people 
would think of swimming the treacher- 
ous channel but this man, despite his 
disability, gave it his best. "He's got a 
lot more guts than anyone I ever knew." 
said close friend Joan Padro "1 don't 
want to talk about failure because he is 
not a failure." He is an inspiration. 

• In Atlantic City, an unknown by the 
name of Lloyd Honeyghan became 
the new Welterweight Champion of 
the World by defeating former undis- 
puted champ Donald Curry with a 6th 
round TKO 

• In Catholic League action last Sunday 
it was: 

Cardinal Dougherty 26. LaSalle 24 
Bishop Egan 21, Archbishop Ryan 14 
St. James 26. Archbishop Carroll 21 
Msgr Bonner 14, St. John Neumann 
St. Josephs 22, Cardinal O'Hara 21 



TD Pass from Coolidge to 

Bucci Lifts Susquehanna 

over DVC 

by John Litzke 

It was an uneasy day at DVC on 
Saturday and an uneasy day nationally 
as well. Congress passed a new tax bill 
which could have some very substantial 
and uncertain effects on us all and it 
rained all over our Homecoming Parade 
and on our football team. 

The Aggies, whose offense was quite 
ineffective throughout the game, suf- 
fered a 7-0 Homecoming loss to the 
visiting Crusaders from Susquehanna. 
The lone touchdown for Susquehanna 
and for the game was scored at 10:40 of 
the third quarter when junior quarter- 
back Todd Coolidge found junior split 
end Al Bucci in the endzone for a nine- 
yard touchdown strike finishing a drive 
that lasted 12 plays and went for 72 
yards. 

Last week Susquehanna, down 42-22 
with just 8:06 left in their game with 
Lycoming, scored three times through 
the air with quarterback Coolidge going 
17 of 23 for 289 yards and a 43-42 vic- 
tory. DVC was coming off a very im- 
pressive offensive and defensive showing 
against Albright with their 31-0 shutout 
last week but offense was not to be found 
last Saturday — for either team . 



The name of the game was defense. 
The Aggie defense held Susquehanna to 
just seven points, eight first downs, in- 
tercepted Coolidge four times (Rich 
Simononis, three; Jon Zellers. one) and 
had outstanding efforts by middle 
linebacker Jim Hannon and tackle Tom 
Voell with eight tackles each. Safety Rich 
Simononis collected seven tackles and 
defensive end Chuck Heiber had three 
tackles, one fumble recovery, and one 
crunching quarterback sack. Congratula- 
tions to Chuck who received the Bruno 
Award in the post game ceremony as 
most valuable player of the Homecom- 
ing game. 

The Susquehanna "D" was just as 
tough, allowing the DVC offense only 
four first downs the entire game, along 
with just 45 yards rushing and 23 yards 
through the air for a total of 68 total 
yards. 

Odds makers in Vegas have found that 
after a low scoring game the previous 
week, high offensive output can be ex- 
pected the next — the Moravian Grey- 
hounds better be prepared. DVC (1-2) 
will travel to Moravian (2-1) for a 
scheduled 2:00 starting time. DVC 
handled Moravian last year with a 27-18 
final so let's make it two in a row. 

Note: This is the first time in 22 years 
that Susquehanna has gotten off to a 3-0 
start. 



DVC Kickers Stun Mules 
Fall to Widener Saturday 

Talk about night and day. That's exactly 
what the two halves of last Wednesday's 
non-league matchup between DVC and 
Muhlenberg looked like. 

In the first half it was just about the 
same old story, offensively ineffective, 
fundamentally unsound soccer. "We just 
pulled ourselves together in the second 
half." said senior Gerry Saul. And pull 
themselves together they did as DVC. 
down 1-0 at half, pulled two goals out of 
a hat in some of the best offensive action 
I've seen in a long time and won 2-1. 

Carlos Salama netted the first goal of 
the game for Muhlenberg off a direct kick 
due to some key mistakes by DVC. Then 
the pep talk came and the rest is history. 
DVC started the second half with new life 
and m*>re of a sound game but the scor- 
ing punch wasn't there, yet. With about 
15 minutes gone in the second half, center 
forward Frank Seidel took a good 40-yard 
direct kick and looped it just over Muhlen- 
berg goalie Mark Maehrer's outstretched 
hand to tie the score. 





The bench comes alive after goal "1 There was 
a lot to be enthusiastic about during DVC's 2 1 
victory 



Goal scorer Frank Seidel (34) avoids Mules 
tackier and passes upfield 

DVC was stormin' now. Then at 39:36 
Winger Chris Freudig took a pass from 
Seidel and tucked it so very nicely into 
the open net for the game winner. The 
name of the game was keep away in the 
final 4:00 to preserve the win for goalie 
Ray Schilling and the Delaware Valley 
team. Although DVC was outshot 19-6. 
they made their shots count. 

Homecoming wasn't as nice to the Ag- 
gies as they had presumed it to be. Up 
against the Pioneers of Widener hoping 
to stretch their win streak to two DVC fell 
short and were shut out 2-0 in this MAC 
matchup. This dropped DVC to an un- 
comfortable 1-7 with matchups this week 
against Haverford (A) on Tuesday, Sep- 
tember 30, Spring Garden (H) on Thurs- 
day, October 2, and an away contest 
tomorrow against Albright. After the Spring 
Garden game on Thursday, DVC will 
not see the friendly confines of "Tasker" 
field until the 15th of October. So hope- 
fully you supported them yesterday. 



Delaware Valley College 



1986 



OCTOBER 



1986 



Sunday 




! 



5 



/ really 

should mail 

that letter! 




12 



TAKE 
TEN 




26 



DEBATE 

KOSTMAYER 

VS. 
CHRISTIAN 

sponsored by WBUX radio 



Monday 



S = Soccer 

FH = Field Hockey 

V = Volleyball 

SC = Student Center 

APR = Ail Purpose Room 



6 



Is It 
Monday 
Already? 



13 



Columbus Day 
(Observed) 

Yom Kippur 

NO CLASS 



Tuesday 




FH/ Wesley (H) 4 p.m. 



"DOC" 

PERFORMS 

in Caesar's Pub 9 p.m. 




E»fc 



*** 



>**/, 



1* 



»* 



20 



3 







27 



Pee IVee s Big Adventure 
9 p.m. APR 



21 



PIANO RECITAL 

by Sir; Sokol Mickoue 

7:30-9 p.m. APR 



28 



V '/Messiah (H) 7 p.m. 




Preregistration Conferences Begin 

I 



Wednesday 




The Big Chill 
9 p.m. APR 



8 



V/Widner (H) 7 p.m. 




15 



FH/Scrantofl (H) 4p.m. 
S/Upsala (H) .1 p in 




22 



S/Scranton (H) 2:30 p.m 

Faculty Development 

Committee Lecture 

"Promises and Problems 

in Genetic Engineering" 

Alfred McFee/7:3() p.m./APR 

Tarot Card Reader 11-2 p.m. 



29 




Children of the Corn 
9 p.m. APR 

Bonsai Lecture 
7 p.m. /Greenhouse 



Thursday 



S/Spring Garden (H) 3:30 p.m. 
FH/FDU (H) 4 p.m. 



Caesar's Pub Nite 



9 p.m. 



undue Op to* 

AiJOTHrU hA>J0WL- . 




16 



we 



GIVE 



UP 



follow a Mondav Schedule 

Caesar's Pub Nite 
9 p.m. 



23 



V/Muhlenburg (H) 7 p.m. 

HAYRIDE 

Behind Admissions 

Music & Refreshments 

Time TBA 



30 




Caesar's Costume 
** Pub Nite - 9 p.m. 



Friday 




Have a good 
weekend! 



17 



Hayride — 6 p.m. 

sponsored by '88 class 

Parent /Student 50s 
Dance — Gym 
8-12 midnight 

Hey. I'm 20 today — alright! 



Saturday 




Rosh Hashanah 



FH/Drew (H) 4 p.m. 

n 




United Nations Day 



Let's 

have a 

smashing 

weekend 





HAYRIDE 

sponsored by the senior class 



Ifi P arents Day 

lO 9-11:30 a.m. 

Reception for parents and faculty 

in the APR 

11:30-1 p.m. 

Parents' luncheon 
All sport teams are home today! 

4-7 p.m. 
"Victory Celebration" - APR 
Music and lots of refreshments 



25 



V/Kings (H) 1 p.m. 






DVC sets for the service. 

Volleyball in Gear Early 

Ladles Pummel FDU 

over Homecoming 

by John Litzke 

The DVC volleyball squad has jumped 
out to an early 3-2 record so far in '86 
with a convincing win over Cedar Crest. 

Following their sweep of Cedar Crest, 
they were beaten by a highly touted 
Haverford squad. 

Tuesday, September 23, a tough Spring 
Garden team visited DVC but DVC pro- 
ceeded to get the broom out and swept 
the Lady Bobcats 15-11, 15-12, and 
15-7. Setters (and spikers) Connie Hajio- 
annou and Sharon Chapman played 
some very consistent volleyball and 
spiker- server extraordinaire Trish Dollar- 
ton sealed the victory for DVC with her 
enthusiastic and powerful play. 

On Thursday, September 25, DVC 
traveled to Bethlehem to face a powerful 
Moravian team and had it not been for a 
poor opening game (15-2 loss) DVC 
might have been in this one. DVC con- 
tended better in the second game with 
improved hitting, setting, and returning 
but dropped the middle match 15-12. 
The third game also went to the Lady 
Greyhounds by a 15-9 score. 

Homecoming found the Volleyball 
squad facing the Lady Devils of FDU. 
DVC played very well as a team and 
swept FDU right out of Work gym, 3-0. 
The upcoming schedule has DVC 
visiting Albright Tuesday, September 30, 
Wilkes at home, Thursday, October 2, 
and Allentown (A) tomorrow. 






$" • J& ?% 



Setter spiker Sharon Chapman unleashes a 
power-filled spike that was a winner in DVC's 
sweep of Spring Garden 

CLUB NEWS 

Chemistry Club 
50/50 Raffle 

by Joe Schnable, President 

The winner of the Chemistry Club's 
Homecoming drawing was ticket 
*4527593, belonging to Dr. Lugar, DVC. 
Dr. Lugar had bought a total of 12 tickets 
for his family and mother. 

The $82 the club kept will be used 
towards students' admission fees at the 
Eastern Analytical Chemistry Exhibit. 

Thanks to everyone for helping out. 




World Series Pool 

by John Litzke 

If you are a major league baseball en- 
thusiast, but then again, even if you're 
not, enter the Ram Pages World Series 
Pool. Choose your National and American 
League champion and your world cham- 
pion, place all three on a slip of paper 
along with your name and box number. 
Place them in box 951 before Friday, 
October 10. The first correct answer 
drawn from the answer box on October 
22, will receive four coupons, each for a 
FREE Aggie burger, French fries, and a 
Pepsi. 

National League: 

New York Mets vs. Houston Astros 

National League Champ 

American League: 

Boston Red Sox vs. California Angels 

American League Champ 

World Champion 



Enter Today - Go€>d Luck! 




Athlete of the Week: Lisa Long 

Athlete of the Week , 

Lisa Long is a junior, right wing on 
DVC's ever improving field hockey team. 
Lisa had a start only some hockey players 
dream of as she scored four goals in the 
team's first three games; two vs. Gwynedd 
Mercy on September 11 and two vs. Im- 
maculata on September 22. Because of 
her offensive skills and team play, Lisa is 
a real asset to the DVC hockey team and 
to head Coach Pam Spotts. For these 
reasons Lisa has been chosen athlete of 
the week. She is a graduate of C.B. East 
High School and resides in Doylestown , 
PA. Congratualations! 

New Computers Available 
for Your Use 

The library now has two Apple He's 
and two printers for student use. Word 
processing software (PFS Write) is also 
available. Mrs. Sell or Mrs. Klaessig will 
be glad to help you get started. Call exten- 
sion 2253 for more information. 



■Bi 



\f I 5TART TO FALL 
ASLEEP TOW, MARCIE JAP 
ME UHTH YOUR RULER „. 





+ a«w!* 



Cross Country Update 

The DVC Harriers record fell to 4-4 on 
Saturday. In front of a Homecoming 
crowd, Dave Spotts turned in a fine per- 
formance, finishing first for the team and 
first in the meet. Dave's record to date is 
undefeated. As for Dave and the other 
two seniors on the team, Gary Kamp- 
meyer and John Thomson, it was the 
last time to run on the home course. 
Gary and John turned in respectable 
places, finishing 15th and 13th respec- 
tively. Jim Enoch's showing was strong 
and is continuing to improve, finishing 
11th. Rounding out the places for the 
Aggies were: Tony Donofrio, 22nd; 
Sean Miller, 29th; and Bill Brosky, 30th. 
A special congratulations goes to Tom 
Await who ran for the Aggies and finished 
32nd, after playing in the soccer game 
earlier in the day. The meet scorings 
were: DVC 17, Widener 42; DVC 30, 
Moravian 26; DVC 43, Susquehanna 
20. 

EQUESTRIAN TEAM 
RESULTS 

Open on die Flat 

Tony Delise — 1st 

Leslie Ward — 2nd 

Beth Meny — 6th 

Intermediate on the Hat 

Theresa Kothstein — 6th 

Beginner Walk-Trot-Canter 

Donna Fort — 2nd 

Julia Kopack — 4th 

Debbie Osterling — 4th 

Laura Harmer — 5th 

Open over Fences 

Leslie Ward — 1st 
Tony Delise — 1st 

Intermediate over Fences 

Becky Moore — 3rd 
Melanie O'Neil - 6th 

Novice over Fences 

Joell Purcel — 3rd 

Advanced Walk-Trot-Canter 

Kris Iandola — 2nd 

Julie Keane — 3rd 
Maryane Vogt — 6th 
Julie Glompiak — 6th 

Free Learning Skills Classes 
for DVC Students Only! 

Every Wednesday at third period (1 1:20 
to 12 Noon), beginning October 8th, 
1986 there will be FREE training in learn- 
ing systems and techniques at the Tutor- 
ing Center in Segal Hall basement. Many 
years of research on how people learn 
have gone into the development of these 
techniques and systems. Don't miss it! 

APPOINTMENTS 
TO SOCIAL BOARD 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed to the College Social Board: 
Richard M. Dommel 
Ray Boltz '87 — co-chairs 
Larry D. Hepner 
Craig Hill 

Theresa Somerville 
Donald E. Billet '87 
Beth Meny '87 
Philip Snyder '88 





Sports Trivia No. 4 

by John Litzke 

WHO AM I? I was one of the premiere 
wide receivers in the NFL from 1964 to 
1980 (mostly with the Miami Dolphins). 
My nickname is "Mr. Unemotional." 1 
recently entered the NFL Hall of Fame. 
During my college years I was a speed 
burner in the low hurdles and played 
under Woody Hayes at Ohio State. 

No one got last week's question: Who is 
the only player to represent four different 
teams in Major League baseball's All Star 
game and which teams? Answer: Rich 
"The Goose" Gossage; the teams — 
Chicago White Sox, New York Yankees, 
Pittsburgh Pirates, and San Diego 
Padres. 

If you have the correct answer to this 
week's trivia question, jot it down on a 
slip of paper along with your name and 
box number and deposit it in box 951. 
First correct answer will receive a coupon 
for a FREE Aggie burger, French fries, 
and a medium Pepsi. 




HAVING TROUBLE COMMUNICATING? IF YOUR WORDS ARENT GETTING YOUR MESSAGE ACROSS COME TO 
THE DVC WRITING CENTER FOR INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION SEE DR HEATH. LASKER 18. FOR SCHEDULING 



Boyles Passes E.M.O. 
to Victory 

Chris "Heisman Hopeful" Boyle passed 
for five touchdowns as E.M.O. beat 
McNuggets 31-6. The leading receivers 
were Bob Fox and Tim Brennon with two 
touchdowns a piece. Also scoring for 
E.M.O. was Mike Zendt. The key factor 
for Boyle getting his TD passes off was 
the offensive line. The line is made up of 
Shaun McGrath, Steve Boto, and Steve 
Smyth. The "D" was great again. Cy 
Rother led the charge with two intercep- 
tions, Vinnie Pastore one and Bill Boyle 
one. E.M.O. is now 2-0. E.M.O. big wins 
should get them in the U.S.A. Today's 
top 25. 

Tie Textile; 

Lose Heartbreaker to Hounds 

Homecoming Washed Out 

by John Litzke 

DVC battled MAC opponent Moravian 
last Thursday and hung with them in a 
scoreless tie the entire way until, with only 
30 seconds left in the game goalie ???? 
came out of the net to boot the ball away, 
she was knocked down and sat on by a 
Moravian player and the ball was sent into 
the net by an awaiting Moravian player 
for the 1-0 victory with just 30 seconds 
left, only 30 seconds. If that 30 seconds 
had passed a bit quicker, I could've told 
you about that 1-0 overtime DVC victory. 

The Textiles from Philadelphia visited 
DVC on Monday and in a tough, tough 
non-league match the Lady Aggies re- 
ceived offensive output on goals by Dee 
Pisauro and Beth Karr. Textile matched 
the two goals and sent the contest into 
double overtime and the field hockey 
marathon ended in a 2-2 deadlock. "It 
was the toughest game so far, both teams 
were evenly matched," commented half- 
back Ranki Kunkel. The Lady Aggies will 
face FDU on Thursday, October 2 at the 
James Work hockey field, Cabrini (A) 
tomorrow and Wesley (H) on Tuesday, 
October 7. 



Fighting Back 
Against Forgetting 

from the Counseling Department 

What causes forgetting? 

All your thoughts, ideas, dreams, and 
emotions have a way of interfering with 
your ability to recall any particular fact. It 
is this interference that causes forgetting. 
So, the more you know, the more poten- 
tial interference you have. (The more stuff 
you have jammed into a crowded closet, 
the harder it is to find a particular item.) 
Retroactive interference takes place when 
later learning interferes with the recall of 
previously learned material. Proactive in- 
terference takes place when previous 
learning inteferes with the recall of later 
learning. Interactive interference occurs 
when older and newer learning interfere 
with the recall of intermediate learning. 
Finally, reactive interference occurs when 
a negative attitude interferes with the re- 
call of learning. 

How Important is motivated 
interest to learning? 

Of utmost importance! Without genuine 
interest in a subject or in improvement in 
your performance, there will be almost 
no retention and thus almost no learning. 
You'll only go through the academic mo- 
tions of learning, and even these will be a 
waste of energy and time. In other words, 
you must want to learn! You must want 
to improve! 

Isn't selecting the right ideas 
to remember difficult? 

Yes, it's difficult, but if you have the 
courage to start doing so, you'll be sur- 
prised how expert you can become in a 
short time. If you want to become an in- 
dependent self-learner, you must stand 
or fall by your personal judgments. In 
your selecting be stingy. Use the fewest 
to do the mostest. 
Doesn't everyone intend 
to remember? 

Wishing to remember and intending to 
remember are two different things. Intend- 
ing takes determined effort. And intend- 
ing means having a game plan: First, pay 
100 percent attention to the task of learn- 
ing. Second, strive hard to understand 
each fact or idea, in your own words. 
Third, make sure you end up with a cor- 
rect, clear, crisp concept to store in your 
memory. In other words, don't just sit 
there — take action. 
A basic background: 
Why is it important? 

Everything you hear, read, see, feel, 
and taste is interpreted in light of what 
you already know. For example, if you 
were asked about the taste of a new ice 
cream, you might say, "It's a cross be- 
tween raspberry and banana." But, to say 
that, you must have had basic background 
knowledge of the tastes of banana and 
raspberry. In sum, the old is the key to 
the meaning of the new. 
Why is organization important? 

Organization is important because it 
helps you remember more information 
longer and better, for three reasons: First, 
mentally handling each piece of informa- 
tion to see where it best fits and then plac- 
ing it into a category, you become familiar 
with the information. Second, as you think 
through and design your organizational 
plan, you get familiar with the information 
and with how it fits in the overall picture. 
Third, organizing ties all the ideas, sub- 
ideas, and details in a neat package, 
which is many times easier to remember 
than scattered bits of information. 
What is recitation and 
how does it help us remember? 

Recitation is simply saying aloud, in 
your own words, the principal points that 
you read in a book or hear in a lecture, 
without looking at the book or your lec- 
ture notes. Recitation helps retention by 
making you think, by creating strong 
memory traces, and by providing time 
for the ideas to move from your short-term 
memory to your long-term memory. 



What docs consolidation 
imply about learning? 

Before an idea, detail, or activity can 
become a permanent part of your memo- 
ry, it has to pass from the short-term mem- 
ory into the long-term memory. For this 
to happen, the idea must be held in the 
mind for a period of time, maybe four or 
five seconds. And this process can occur 
only when you think over the idea, detail, 
or activity, as you recite or write it, or as 
you review lecture notes. 
What's the story on massed versus 
distributed practice? 

Generally speaking, breaking a study 
session of, say, three hours, into six half- 
hour sessions with five-minute breaks be- 
tween sessions, is better than trying to do 
the job all in one sitting. Taking breaks is 
good because it relieves boredom and fa- 
tigue and gives you time to "recharge 
your batteries" for another strong effort. 
However, if you can stick with study ses- 
sions for longer periods of time, that's 
okay. And some assignments should be 
done all in one sitting, because to stop 
would mean losing the facts and thoughts 
already held at the tip of your memory. 
In other words, you must use your judg- 
ment about breaks. 
Can drawing a picture 
help you to remember? 

Yes! Dr. Allan Paivio calls it the "dual 
code" theory. If you remember with 
words alone you're using only half your 
brain. Add a diagram, and you're sud- 
denly making use of the whole brain. 
When it comes to memory, the combina- 
tion of words and pictures is hard to 
forget. 
How does association work? 

Association is the mind's glue. To re- 
member a new fact, you glue it to a fact 
you already have in your memory, 
through association. 
What makes mnemonic 
devices work? 

Mnemonic devices work on the princi- 
ple of association. Each part of a mne- 
monic device is a direct cue to the facts 
or ideas that you want to remember, i.e. 
"Thirty days hath September, April, June, 
and November . . . 
Can almost all things be 
learned without mnemonics? 

The answer has to be yes. Sometimes, 
however, the result may not be worth the 
memorization effort. Most things should 
be learned through understanding and 
organization, but items that defy organi- 
zation or are too complex can be remem- 
bered through mnemonics. 
What are the main criticisms 
of mnemonics? 

The criticisms are three: that material 
memorized by rote lacks understanding; 
that mnemonic devices just add to the 
memory's overall load ; and that material 
learned through mnemonics is soon for- 
gotten. 
What's good about mnemonics? 

At least two things: First, mnemonic 
devices are sound and effective ways to 
organize your material and keep it straight. 
Second, when information that was 
learned through mnemonics is used fre- 
quently, it becomes a permanent part of 
your knowledge. 
Do mnemonics help in exams? 

Yes! In one study, all students using 
mnemonics raised their test scores over 
scores they attained without using mne- 
monics. 

There will be free learning skills 
classes held every Wednesday, third 
period, beginning October 8th in 
the Tutoring Center. Contact Mr. 
Steve Davis at the Tutoring Center, 
ext. 2309. 



/I LEGEND LIVES ON 

By Bob Wecht 

From Vol. XV/V, No. 6 
Friday, October 12, 1984 

At the tender age of fourteen Ernest 
Purnell came to work as a janitor at Dela- 
ware Valley College (then known as the 
National Farm School) in 1910 Although 
his family home is in Baltimore, he and 
another man left to find work Del Val 
hasn't been the same since. 

Ernest was bom May 10. 1895. He was 
the sixth of six children and reared in a 
Methodist environment The love of na- 
ture has always been with him and even 
after eighty-nine years he still breeds tropi 
cal fish and parakeets. 

Mr. Purnell's earliest experiences here 
on campus included not only janitorial 
responsibilities but chauffer duties for Del 
Val's founder. Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf 
"Dr Rabbi" as he is remembered, always 
brings fond memories to this local college 
legend 




"I always made sure Segal Hall was 

nice and warm for him (Rabbi Krauskopf) 

. . years ago coal was used instead of oil, 

so 1 set my alarm and was there every 

morning." 




NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Val's home away from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: Cooler Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

/Area's Best Lunches 11 AM-3 PM 

Happy Hour 4-6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



While working at Del Val Ernest was 
rudely interrupted by World War I. He 
served as a Private 1st class in Company 
D. 333rd Service Battalion, Q.M.C. train- 
ing and fighting both occurred overseas 
"Hell all the way through, but any sacrifice 
for America was worth it." His discharge 
papers hang proudly in his room. 

At one point. Ernest was moonlighting 
in a restaurant near the college to help 
pay for car expenses. One night. Presi- 
dent Theodore Roosevelt came to dinner 
and Purnell was chosen to wait on him 
Roosevelt was so taken by Ernest that he 
wanted to bring him back to Washington 
to work in the White House Luckily for 
the college the Presidents offer was 
declined. 

When asked how the students and fac- 
ulty of today are different from those in 
the school's beginnings, it was made quite 
clear that attitudes have changed "In the 
Farm School people were like brothers, 
but today many think they are higher up 
and better people — not equals." 

"The great man who put us on this 
earth didn't want people to be different 
from each other — just equal . there is 
bad in all races, what religion doesn't 
matter — we were given brains to be the 
best we can and to be smart enough to 
love our neighbors ." Why can't people 
see the truth? 

If you don't know where to find Mr. 
Purnell. all you need to do is check out 
the second floor of the Alumni House. Er- 
nest will be the man with a cigar in his 
mouth Next time you have the opportu- 
nity, stop and have a chat . . you won't 
be sorry you did! 



Editors Note: Ernie Purnell recently fell 
and damaged his spine. He went into 
Doylestown Hospital for an operation 
and is now feeling much better. He is 
under the care of the nursing home in 
the old Doylestown Hospital building. 
According to Mrs. Fisher of the DVC in- 
firmary, Ernie is his normal self again, 
chatting with residents and passers-by 
near his room next to the center's sun 
room. Ram Pages staff sends Ernie our 
best wishes for a full recovery and happier 
times! 



Personals 



Chunka Victims — 
Joell P. September 23, B and R 
Kirsten K. September 27, B and T slowly 
It's Yuk, not Chunka — Right Kirsten? 

Larry B. — Where have you been? 

Hey Bee. how did you like the movie? 
Did you do well on your test? 

To my fifth roommate — Why was the 
bed shaking? 

Miss Feigles: Check your mailbox; and if 
you're not typical, give me a call. Even if 
you're not. give me a call Me 



STAFF 

Editors-in-Chief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Artist Monica Etzweiler 

Reporters Missy Brangan , Brett 

Hart, Judy Henry, Melanie O'Neill, 
Cheryl Snyder, Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry. Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien. 

Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news in the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 





IHMaffOTS^ Wfl@§p ©§)flfl®g® 



Vol. XXI. No. 6 

Friday, October 10. 1986 




Highlights: 

Dear Editors 2 

Sports Wrap-Up 3 

Personals 4 



NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



Don't Fall Into the Racism Trap 



by Bill Rein 

A few weeks ago, Japan's top govern- 
ment official was quoted by his country's 
newspapers as saying that the level of in- 
telligence in the U.S. is lowered due to 
the fact that it is a multiracial society. 

Premier Yasuhiro Nakasone, speaking 
to approximately 1,000 young members 
of his Liberal Democratic Party, was 
defending his statement that politics in 
Japan must confront their national prob- 
lems, in "an information -oriented, highly 
educated society such as Japan." Added 
the premier, "the level in the U.S. is 
lowered because of a considerable num- 
ber of blacks, Puerto Ricans and Mexi- 
cans." A party official said that Nakasone 
was referring to the "literacy level." 

Nakasone must have been suffering 
an acute case of what is commonly known 
by us less educated American mongrels 
as "Hoof in mouth" disease, for the day 
after these remarks were released, Mr. 
Nakasone said that he "did not intend 
racial prejudice ..." but then explained 
that "there are certain things difficult for 
its [the United States] reach, because it is 
a multiracial society." Uh-huh . . What? 

"1 intended to say that it is easier in 
Japan's monoracial society." 

This indeed seems to be a clarification 
— it makes clear Mr. Nakasone's racial 
bias. It illustrates that even a "highly edu- 

Myths About College Loans: 

Debt Does Not Affect 

Career Choice 

Research shows undergraduate stu- 
dents' career choices are not significantly 
influenced by their indebtedness from 
bonowing money to pay for college, ac- 
cording to a report in the summer issue 
of Connections, a publication of the New 
England Board of Higher Education. 

The article also took aim at other myths 
about student financial aid, claiming that 
student loan defaults are more often re- 
lated to a graduate's unwillingness to pay 
than to inability. College dropouts are 
more likely to default on loans than 
graduates, the report said. 

The amount of money a student bor- 
rows is not a reliable predictor of whether 
a student will default on loans, according 
to the article. In fact, the National Com- 
mission on Student Aid found that the 
more a student borrows, the more likely 
he or she is to repay the loans. 

Other popular misconceptions about 
students were also challenged. For in- 
stance, the article reports that when both 
spouses have borrowed money, married 
couples are more likely to repay loans 
than single borrowers. Also, among 
graduates earning more than $1,000 per 
month, there is no evidence that indebt- 
edness forces the postponement of pur- 
chasing cars, homes and other big-ticket 
items. 

Even though New England is home to 
many of the nation's most expensive 
private colleges, the average student 
loan burden in the six New England 
states is $5,000, while the national aver- 
age is almost $10,000. 



cared society" such as one finds in Japan 
can fall prey to the feeling that one's 
group, or race, usually if one is in the 
majority, is superior to another race or 
other groups. In this case, I'd call it biting 
the hand that feeds you. 

For Mr. Nakasone to make such a 
statement about that country which has 
lent its most intelligent men to rebuild his 
society, and who is the major supporter 
of its defense, even its economy, could 
easily lead to reverse racism from the 
U.S. toward the Japanese. However, 
the best defense against racism is to 
avoid the racism trap ourselves. For one 
thing, we ourselves cannot deny the lin- 
gering, widespread racism against those 
people the Premier mentioned and 
others, which exists in the U.S. 

Nonetheless, we in the U.S. have an 
inherent weapon against such statements 
— a weapon that Mr. Nakasone himself 
has pointed out. Our society is multi- 
racial, built with successive waves of im- 
migrants upon our shores, fleeing racism 
of their own homelands in many cases; 
and most of us are proud of our ethnicity! 
An insult against multiracialty could not 
truly be made by an American, for that 
would be an insult against oneself. Let's 
hope that the Japanese will learn from 
their disadvantages as a monoracial 
society. 




Tim Kohl accepts cash as Beth Whetstone hands 
Dr Avery a stock certificate. Frank Hoffman, 
marketing manager, witnesses 

STOCK OFFER ANNOUNCED 
BY AG. MARKETING CORP. 

by Margaret Freeman 

AGRICULTURAL MARKETING AS- 
SOCIATES announces a tender stock 
offer to the students, faculty and staff of 
DVC. This dynamic, informal coopera- 
tive foresees an excellent opportunity for 
the entire community to share in the 
talents of members of the Agricultural 
Sales and Marketing course. 

Stocks are issued at $10.00 a share; 
an individual can purchase just one 
share. For many this is the first opportu- 
nity to be a stockholder in our economy. 
Therefore, this means a hands-on op- 
portunity to obtain a glimpse of how a 
cooperative operates. 

How do you purchase a share? On 
Wednesday, October 15, 1986 during 
third period (11:20 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.) 
members of the class will be in Segal Hall 
for anyone that wants to purchase stock. 
They will accept cash or check. 

What is a benefit for this investment? A 
share of the profits make this a worth- 
while place for your cash. Our Agribusi- 
ness Department Chairman, Dr. John 
Avery, anticipates a profit. He is the first 
investor for the 1986 fall class. So, come 
and be a part of the American dream. In- 
vest and profit. 



WORLD FOOD DAY 
October 16, 1986 

by Msgr. Robert J. Coll 
Executive Director 
Interfaith Hunger Appeal 

World Food Day gives us an opportu- 
nity to consider some facts related to 
global hunger. Presently, some five hun- 
dred million people experience hunger 
on a continuing basis, that is, one out of 
every ten people on Earth, approximate- 
ly 30 million people in America. 

The average person in the developed 
world consumes more than 3,000 calo- 
ries a day while a person in the develop- 
ing world gets about 2,000 calories. It 
should be remembered that a body at 
rest needs 1,600 calories daily. 

In rural areas of poor countries, the 
caloric intake of people is well below the 
required 1,600. There were long periods 
during the Ethiopian famine when a per- 
son received less than 800 calories a 
day. Needless to say, malnutrition was 
rampant, starvation and death common, 
especially among children under five and 
expecting and lactating mothers. 

For a variety of reasons, mostly man- 
made, the lives of some 200 million peo- 
ple in Africa will be threatened for years 
to come because of severe food short- 
ages. Weak political structures, cultural 
deprivation, poor agricultural policies 
and economic exploitation are some of 
the causes that effect the lives of the poor 
who hunger. 

However, there is enough food pro- 
duced each year in the world to feed 
every person on Earth. We, the interna- 
tional community, have the know-how 
and ability to train those in need to grow 
their own food, and we have the capabil- 
ity to deliver emergency food to those 
who live in remote areas. 

What then is the problem? The prob- 
lem is that we lack the will. For some rea- 
son, we choose to use large portions of 
global economic resources to develop 
military capability rather than humanity. 
Imagine, the world spends 750 billions of 
dollars a year for armament, 1.4 million 
dollars a minute. Some 500,000 scien- 
tists are needed for the development, 
manufacture and delivery of the toys of 
war. Just think of what might be accom- 
plished if one-third of the international 
military commitment to arms were di- 
verted to the development of the poor 
who hunger. 

But what can I do? I'm only one per- 
son. You can do a great deal. You can 
become a voice for the voiceless by ac- 
tively participating in the formation of 
local, corporate and national policies 
which are more sensitive to the poor who 
hunger. Encourage your local communi- 
ty, your church or synagogue, your 
company, your nation to be actively in- 
volved in developing the lives of the 
hungry. 

Were it not for the mystery of life, you 
and your children might be part of the 
500 million. Every now and then "TAKE 
A FRIEND TO LUNCH" by sending the 
cost of an afternoon meal to any local or 
overseas agency that brings hope to the 
hungry. 




The victim, in better days. 
Photo/M OTVel// 

Goose, Victim of 
Campus Violence 

by M. O'Neill 

I recently read an article that conclud- 
ed that children who show cruelty to 
animate often grow up to be antisocial 
adults. We must have a few of these self- 
absorbed brats around the DVC campus; 
and worst of all, someone has supplied 
one of them with a lethal weapon. I am 
referring to the recent cruelty on cam- 
pus: someone impaled a large white 
goose with an arrow down by Lake Ar- 
cher. Fortunately, members of the main- 
tenance arew discovered the wounded 
goose and took it to the Poultry Diagnos- 
tic Laboratory. 

It must be a challenge for a hunter to 
hit a tame, flightless goose which will 
come within three feet of people. (I 
wonder if that's where the expression 
"sitting duck" came from.) I guess the 
perpetrator finds the broad side of a barn 
a real test of skill. 

This is not the first incident of its kind 
on campus. Last year, someone kicked 
to death this most recent victim's mate. 
Furthermore, last year I found numerous 
dead crows in the parking lot behind 
Wolfsohn Hall; the crows were presum- 
ably shot with a BB gun. There were also 
several dead squirrels (that had not fallen 
out of trees) by Ulman Hall. 

cont'd on page 4 




is Week on 
Campus 



* by Wendy L. Unger 



10 

VoHeybafl (A) Dk&nsoft Tournament, 

4r ' 5 p m 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER M 

FootbaB (A) vs. Upaala, 1:30 p.m. 

* Socca (A) ■, I nanus i; a 

Equestrian Team (A) vs. Lehigh 

Rett Hockey fffl vs. Drew, 4 p.m 

^ Volleyball (A) Dickinson Tournament 
5pm 

^ MONDAY, OCTOBER 13 

Columbus Day, Yom Kipp ur 
NO CLASSES!! 
^ Refcj Hockey (AJ vs Wklenei 4p 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14 

FUm . Pee Wee's Big Aduenrure, 9 

^ p m m the APH 

WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 15 

Soccer (H) v*. Upsala 3 p m 

* ReW Hockey (H hi Saenton 4 p.ra 
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16 

Caesar's Pub, 9 p ~ 
*| Fofcw a MONDAY scheduk 

V olayb e l (A) w. Scranten, 7 p.m. 
-^^RRR^BRBR^BBT- 




Why Take Notes? from the Counseling Department 

Your objective in taking notes in class is to capture the instructor's ideas in the order in 
which they are given, so you can take them back to your room to study and master. 
You have to take notes or else you'll forget what you've heard. Incidentally, you should 
ignore the complainers who argue that notetaking prevents you from listening. These 
are the very same students who consistently find themselves at the bottom of the class. 
Instead, notice how rapidly and how massively forgetting takes place. 

A secret recording was made of a discussion. Two weeks later, those who took part in 
the discussion were asked to write down all they could recall about it. The recollections 
were checked against the recording, and it was found that the average number of specif- 
ic points recalled by an individual was only 8.4 percent of the total. Moreover, 42 per- 
cent of the recalled points were incorrect to some degree: Happenings were reported 
that never took place; casual remarks were greatly expanded; points were reported that 
had only been hinted at; and so forth. 

In sum, only fragments were recalled, and even these fragments were distorted. And 
the people who forgot 91.6 percent of the specific points raised in the discussion were 
highly educated members of the Cambridge Psychological Society! 

Listening Is The First Step 

To take good notes, you have to be a good listener, and good listeners are not so 
common as you might think. It is not enough simply to hear all the words. You have to 
transfer the ideas from the short-term memory to the long-term memory. And you have 
to be able to see and interpret all ideas — main ideas and sub-ideas — in the context of 
the whole lecture. 

Research shows that an- average student remembers about 50 percent of a ten-minute 
lecture when tested immediately, and only 25 percent when tested 48 hours later. 
These poor results are due to students not knwoing how to "package" the lecturer's 
ideas into more easily remembered units. However, listening is a skill, and it can be im- 
proved. One way to do so is to eliminate ten well-researched bad listening habits and to 
adopt in their place the habits of good listeners. 

Ten Bad Listening Habits 

Ralph G. Nichols, an internationally known expert on listening, identified the ten bad 
listening habits that are paraphrased below. Eliminate them, and you'll be a better listener. 

1 . Calling a subject dull A poor listener will "turn off' as soon as he or she decides a 
lecture is going to be dull. And such a decision is usually based on ignorance rather 
than knowledge. 

A good listener will listen closely for information that can be important or useful, 
even in a seemingly dull presentation . 

2. Criticizing a speaker. A poor listener will find fault with the speaker — perhaps a 
rumpled suit or a monotonous voice — and infer that such a speaker can't have 
anything important to say. 

A good listener will realize that a lecture is not a fashion show. He or she will look 
for ideas, not for things to criticize. 

3. Ovenreacting. A poor listener will become so involved in disagreeing with the speaker 
that he or she will miss most of the lecture. 

A good listener will listen with the mind, not with the emotions. He or she will 
simply jot down a disagreement, to ask about later, and then go on listening. 

4. Listening for facts only. A poor listener wants only facts and considers the "big pic- 
ture" as nothing more than someone else's opinion. 

A good listener wants to see how facts illustrate principles; how examples illustrate 
ideas; and how evidence supports arguments. He or she realizes that facts are im- 
portant, but only in relation to principles, ideas and arguments. 

5. Outlining everything. A poor listener tries to force every lecture into a rigid mold 
through detailed outlining. He or she is so busy with form and style that the content 
is missed. 

A good listener adjusts his or her notetaking to the speaker's topic and organiza- 
tional partem. 

6. Faking attention. A poor listener will lock his or her eyes onto the speaker and then 
relax, expecting to get the information out of the textbook later, during study time. 

A good listener realizes that each lecture is a chance to get, in fifty minutes, facts 
and ideas that the speaker took hours to assemble. 

7. Yielding to distractions. A poor listener will use every little distraction — footsteps, a 
door opening or closing, a cough, a dropped pencil — as an excuse to stop listening 
to the instructor. 

A good listener disciplines himself or herself to shut out distractions and to con- 
centrate on the speaker's message. 

8. Choosing only easy stuff. To a poor listener, it's too much trouble and hard work to 
follow the instructor's complex arguments and ideas. Such a student wants enter- 
tainment, not learning. 

A good listener is intellectually curious, wants to see how the speaker proves his 
or her points, and is not afraid of tough, technical or complex ideas. 

9. Overreacting to emotional words. A poor listener overreacts, almost blows up, at 
personally emotional words, such as communist, income tax, Nazi or evolution. His 
or her blood pressure rises, and listening comes to an end. 

A good listener hears the same emotion-laden words but will listen even more in- 
tently, to follow the message or argument and see where the speaker's prejudices 
lie. 
10. Wasting thought speed. Even a poor listener realizes that thinking proceeds at a 
much higher rate than speech (actually about four times as fast) . The poor listener 
usually moves along lazily with the speaker or uses his or her thought speed to solve 
personal problems. Often, this results in the poor listener falling behind the speaker 
and giving up for the rest of the lecture. 

A good listener uses his or her thought speed and any pauses in the lecture to dis- 
tinguish supporting material from main ideas, make fast summaries of the lecture's 
highlights and anticipate the lecturer's next point. 

The Listening Attitude 

Attitude is probably the most important requirement for effective listening. So assume 
a positive mental attitude. You must convince yourself that the lecturer has something 
useful to say. Begin by realizing how lucky you are to have such an easy way of obtain- 
ing so much information. The lecturer had to do the searching, reading, selecting, dis- 
carding and organizing of information from dozens of books, spending perhaps hun- 
dreds of hours. 

The most productive attitude is the sympathetic one. Show that you are with the 
speaker by having a pleasant expression on your face, keeping your eyes on the speaker 



when you're not writing notes and nodding your head when you agree. Your reward? 
You'll be treating the speaker as you would want to be treated; you'll immediately notice 
a more enthusiastic flow of words and ideas from him or her; and — most important — 
you'll be concentrating tike you've never concentrated before. 

Hearing Versus Listening 

Hearing is strictly mechanical. We don't have to learn to hear, for physically we are 
equipped to do so right from birth. In fact, studies have shown that we hear even during 
sleep. However, unless they are unusually loud, most of us won't remember the sounds 
that we heard during the night. 

Listening, on the other hand, is the absorption of the meanings of words and sen- 
tences by the brain. This, in turn, leads to the understanding of facts and ideas. But lis- 
tening takes (1) attention, or sticking to the task at hand in spite of possible distractions, 
and (2) concentration, which is the focusing of your thoughts upon one problem. Con- 
centration does not mean thinking only one thought. Various ideas will flash into your 
mind, and you can either discard or pursue them. Concentration means holding a cen- 
tral issue or problem in mind and having ideas that are related to that issue. 

A good way to begin concentrating is to anticipate the lecture. Look over your notes 
from the last lecture, and then take two minutes to answer the question, "What is she 
going to talk about today?" Or, if the lectures follow your textbook, peek ahead to see 
what's coming next. Then, once the lecture starts, let your mind dart ahead (during 
pauses) to anticipate what's coming next. You'll be alert, engrossed in the material and 
concentrating 100 percent. And remember this: You cannot attain concentration by 
concentrating on the act itself. Your attention must focus on the data and ideas. 

With this head start on concentration, and with a desire to learn, you have already 
begun the process of serious listening. To keep it going, show up in the classroom with 
sharp pencils and a good-sized notebook. Then begin taking notes the moment the 
speaker begins. To take intelligent notes, you will have to listen attentively, with natural 
concentration. And you will be combatting the boredom that leads to sleepiness and 
daydreaming. 

These techniques and systems are learning skills and therefore, with training, they 
can be learned. There will be a free training in these skills offered each Wednesday, third 
period, in the Tutoring Center (Segal Hall Basement). For information on these and 
other skills contact Mr. Steve Davis at the Tutoring Center, ext. 2309. 



DVC: Room for Improvement 
Dear Editors, 

Approximately three years ago DVC 
dedicated a beautiful new building to the 
student body. At present, this building is 
open five days a week, from 8:30 a.m. 
to 11:30 p.m. What students do you 
know who keep those hours? Any stu- 
dent burning the midnight oil and yearn- 
ing for a late night snack can forget it. 
With the closing of the Center, the snack 
bar and vending machines are out of 
reach. What about those whose room- 
mates go to bed early? Dorm lounges are 
either unfurnished or often populated by 
late night TV fans; too bad the new Stu- 
dent Center, which has study lounges, is 
closed so early. 

On weekends, the library is only open 
so long, and, once again, too bad the 
Student Center is not open. Need a 
private place to talk? Roommate goes to 
bed early? Big test tomorrow, you'd like 
a nap, and roommate parties? Sorry — 
the Student Center is closed . 

Meanwhile, Security personnel are 
crammed into a tiny office with drafty 
windows and uncomfortable furniture. 
With plenty of empty rooms in the 
Center, why can't Security move in 
there; this would have the dual advan- 
tage of comfortable convenience for 
Security and would allow them to keep a 
close eye on an open Student Center. 

Longer hours for the Center would 
not hurt anyone; in fact, most colleges, 
where the administration cares about the 
student body, keep their Student Cen- 
ters open 24 hours a day, seven days a 
week. With Security housed in the same 
building, longer hours and open week- 
ends would be easy to implement, good 
for the student-administration relation- 
ship and might increase student GPA's. 

Any feelings related to this would be 
greatly appreciated. 

Sincerely, 

Noelle Cavanaugh 



I.C.C. Scholarship 

Applications are now available from 
any I.C.C. representative or the Alumni 
Affairs Office for the I.C.C. scholarship. 
Two awards of $200 will be given to the 
two top choices. Monies will be applied 
to the spring semester bill. Due date for 
applications is November 1 . Please return 
to the Alumni Affairs Office: Mrs. Dolby. 






Weekend Workers 



Dear Editors, 

DVC is not an inexpensive school to 
attend and with tuition rising most stu- 
dents find it necessary to have weekend 
jobs. I would like the administration to 
explain to me WHY there is no breakfast 
on Saturday and Sunday? Working stu- 
dents miss lunch anyway; should they 
miss breakfast too? The snack bar is inac- 
cessible on weekends with the Student 
Center closed, vending machines are 
either locked up or subject to other prob- 
lems, and we are not allowed to cook in 
our rooms. 

We are working to earn money, NOT 
run up food bills! After buying breakfast 
and lunch on weekends, I spend $20 
plus money for gasoline. I would like the 
administration to keep this in mind when 
planning future meal schedules. 

Sincerely, 
Niles Ellington 

RA's in Absentia 

Dear Editors, 

Over the past three years of living on 
campus, summers as well as regular 
terms, I have had many an RA (Resident 
Assistant). Some performed their job 
well, some were just okay, some were 
even grouchy; but never before have I 
experienced "RA's in Absentia." 1 am re- 
ferring to the unfortunate dilemna of 
having both RA's on Barness Hall, sec- 
ond floor, on the Livestock Judging 
Team. 

It's not that these girls are a problem, 
since Barness second is a very courteous 
and conscientious group, but one RA for 
an entire dorm is just not enough! This is 
not a case of occasional trips; these ex- 
cursions of RA's last weeks at a time. 
Maybe the roommates living on Barness 
second should be made RA's since at 
least they are here. 

Name withheld 
upon request 



Quote of the Week 

"If you stop playing favorites, maybe 
we would start scoring some points. " 

Signed, 

A Concerned Fan 



SPORTS WRAP-UP 



LITZKE'S 
SPORTS' BRIEFS 

by John Litzke 

• With the exception of Magic Johnson, 
Maurice Cheeks is the highest paid 
guard in the world after the Sixers final- 
ly sign him to a $3.98 million deal that 
will pay Cheeks $995,000 annually. 
And he's worth every penny. 

• Eagles all-pro defensive back Wes 
Hopkins is suspected to be out for the 
rest of the 1986-87 season, he under- 
went arthroscopic knee surgery last 
Tuesday morning and now it is rumored 
that he could possibly return before the 
end of the season. We sure hope so. 

• In high school football this week and 
weekend it was: 

Edison 10, Gratz 8 
Northeast 33, Frankford 10 
West Philadelphia 26, BOK 6 
Martin Luther King 21, Mastbaum 14 
Ben Franklin 22, University City 14 
Washington 26, Lincoln 6 
Germantown 19, Dobbins 6 
Bartram 26, Overbrook 
Germantown Academy 16, Olney 12 
Episcopal 17, Central 3 
Roxborough 8, Southern 2 
W. Catholic 24, Archbishop Carroll 20 
Cardinal O'Hara 31, Msgr. Bonner 13 
C.B. West 3, Council Rock 2 (on a 

three-run homer in the 3rd quarter) 
Bishop McDevitt 14, North Catholic 7 
Bishop Kenrick 14, LaSalle 10 
Pennridge 34, Pennsbury 14 
Quakertown 21, Hatboro- Horsham 14 
Abington 28, William Tennent 
Methacton 34, Springfield 
Lansdale Catholic 7, Pottsgrove 3 

• Eagles release *1 draft pick of a year 
ago Kevin Allen and then he proceeds 
to get himself thrown in jail for suppos- 
edly sexually assaulting a Massachu- 
setts woman and severely beating her 
male companion in Atlantic City. He 
was released on $100,000 bail. What a 

guy 

• In college football action last weekend 
it was: 

Penn State 31, Rutgers 6 
Miami, FL 34, Northern Illinois 
Oklahoma 56, Kansas State 10 
Nebraska 27, South Carolina 24 
Penn 42, Columbia 7 
Alabama 28, Notre Dame 10 
Auburn 55, Western Carolina 6 
Iowa 24, Michigan State 21 
Texas A&M 45, Texas Tech 8 
Shepard 66, Salem, WV 14 
Temple 19, Pitt 13 



Evangel 52, Langston 
Dayton 57, Dubuque 

• In college football games of interest it 
was: 

Widener 14, Lycoming 13 
Bloomsburg 20, East Stroudsburg 3 
Juniata 21, Albright 3 
Susquehanna 24, Wilkes 3 
Lebanon Valley 14, Upsala 13 
Jackson St. 28, Delaware St. 25 
Navy 45, Dartmouth 
Gettysburg 34, Johns Hopkins 7 
Muhlenberg 36, Western Maryland 15 

• ABC fires Broadway Joe Namath from 
the Monday Night Football broadcast 
booth because of his unprofessional 
behavior when he made some mean 
and nasty remarks about Frank Gif- 
ford. Oh Joe, you bully! I'm glad 
you're out and sincerely hope you stay 
out 'cause you're a bum. 

• Phillies end season on winning note 
with 2-1 victory over Montreal. Finish 
11 games over .500 and have a lot of 
optimism about 1987 as far as their 
pitching goes. 

• In American League playoff action on 
Tuesday night, California 8, Boston 1. 
On Wednesday afternoon, Boston 9, 
California 2. In National League play- 
off action on Wednesday night, Hous- 
ton 1, New York 0. 

•Sixers deal 30-year-old, 6-10 center 
Clemon Johnson to Seattle along with 
a 1989 first round pick for big men Tim 
McCormick and Danny Vranes. 

• New Jersey Nets acquired forward 
Orlando Woolridge from Chicago for a 
first round pick in '87 and second 
round picks in '88 and '90. The New 
York Knicks sign *1 draft pick Kenny 
"Sky" Walker, out of Kentucky to a 
multi-year contract. The east is going 
to be a beast. 

• In NFL action last Sunday it was: 
Philadelphia 16, Atlanta 
Washington 14, New Orleans 6 
Chicago 23, Minnesota 

New England 34, Miami 7 
N.Y. Giants 13, St. Louis 7 
Cleveland 27, Pittsburgh 24 
Detroit 24, Houston 13 
Cincinnati 34, Green Bay 28 
L.A. Raiders 24, Kansas City 17 
Denver 29, Dallas 14 
San Francisco 35, Indianapolis 14 
N.Y. Jets 14, Buffalo 13 
L.A. Rams 26, Tampa Bay 20 
Seattle 33, San Diego 7 

• On Sunday the matchups go this way: 
Philadelphia vs. N.Y. Giants 
Buffalo vs. Miami 

Chicago vs. Houston 

Detroit vs. Green Bay 

Kansas City vs. Cleveland 

L.A. Rams vs. Atlanta 

New Orleans vs. Indianapolis 

N.Y. Jets vs. New England 

St. Louis vs. Tampa Bay 

Washington vs. Dallas 

Seattle vs. L.A. Raiders 

Minnesota vs. San Francisco 

Denver vs. San Diego 

Mon. night: Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati 



Sports Quiz 

QUESTION #5: 

With the 1986 World Series upon us 
and the New York Mets involved, here's 
something for you to ponder about the 
last time the Mets were involved back in 
1969. 

Who was the team the Met* beat 
In '69 to win the National League 
Pennant and who did they beat to 
win the aeries? 



No one got the answer to the Week # 3 
question. In August 1978, Pete Rose 
was with the Cincinnati Reds and shoot- 
ing at Joe DiMaggio's 56 consecutive 
game hitting streak. Pete fell short of 
DiMaggio's record but he tied the Na- 
tional League record. Whose record did 
he tie and how many games did his hit- 
ting streak last? 

Answer: Wee Willie Keeler, and his 
hitting streak lasted 44 games. 



DVC "ZEROS" IN 

ON 'HOUNDS, 

GAME ENDS IN TIE 

by John Litzke 

The space race has been escalating 
feverishly throughout the world, every- 
where but the U.S. that is, because of the 
recent shuttle disaster. The reason for all 
this astronomical hubbub is that, back on 
October 4, 1957, the Russians launched 
the first satellite into space. Twenty-nine 
years later the Aggie Football Fan Club 
and the Greyhound Football Fan Club 
gazed up on the scoreboard with no time 
remaining and saw all zeros. There was 
no rockets red glare or memorable lift- 
off, there wasn't even a touchdown as 
last Saturday DVC and Moravian battled 
in Bethlehem to a scoreless tie, a draw, a 
grid-faron standoff. 

Both teams entered the game with 
identical 1-2 recors and they're still exact 
after last Saturday's game. Moravian is a 
better club than their record might indi- 
cate suffering a 3-0 loss to Widener, a 
tough bss to MAC powerhouse Juniata 
14-13 and a victory over hapless Leba- 
non Valley 21-6 and this tie makes them 
1-2-1. While on the other side, and quite 
strangely, DVC has been involved in 
shutouts in their first four games. 36-0 
and 7-0 losses to Gettysburg and Sus- 
quehanna respectively and a 31-0 vic- 
tory over Albright and the 0-0 tie make 
DVC 1-2-1 as well. 

Needless to say, both defensive units 
played outstanding football with DVC 
holding the 'Hounds at bay even when 
Moravian threatened inside the DVC 
10-yard line on three separate occasions. 

The Aggie offense was not a factor at 
all. The Moravian offense led in every 



statistical category and had it not been 
for some very key Greyhound turnovers 
and four missed field goals by Moravian 
kicker Scott Perry (from 32, 25, 32, 37 
yards out) the outcome could have been 
a bad one for DVC fans. 




With the offense struggling, the defense 
is seeing a lot of time and they're rising to 
the task. Defensive backs Mike Heisy 
and Steve Clark each had interceptions 
and both defensive back Rich Simononis 
and linebacker Vince Bedesem have 
been honored as MAC defensive player 
of the week. 

DVC takes their 1-2-1 record on the 
road Once again tomorrow when they 
will face the Upsala Vikings in East 
Orange, N J for a 1:30 starting time. 



HEISMAN WATCH 

D Chris Boyle, E.M.O. (2-0) 
Quarterback, senior 
Thursday: Lap Sappers 
Last week: 25 art., 15 comp., 300 
yds. , 5 TDs; 1986: 45 art. , 34 comp. , 
550 yds., 8 TDs, 1 int., 3 TD rushing 

D Brian Bos worth. Oklahoma (2-1) 

Linebacker, junior 

Saturday: vs. Kansas State 

Last week: 14 tackles, 10 solo (1 for 

loss) vs. Miami (FL); 1986: 31 tackles, 

21 solos (3 for losses), 1 deflection 

□ Jim Harbaugh, Michigan (3-0) 
Quarterback, senior 
Saturday: at Wisconsin 
Last week: 16 art., 9 comp., 122 
yds. vs. Florida State; 1986: 57 att, 
38 comp., 532 yds., 3 TDs, 1 int. 

i ] Paul Palmer, Temple (2-2) 
Running back, senior 
Saturday: at Pittsburgh 
Last week: 19 att., 67 yds., 1 TD; 2 
catches, 20 yds., 3 kickoff returns, 70 
yds. vs. Brigham Young; 1986: 96 
att., 540 yds., 6 TDs; 5 catches, 53 
yds., 7 kickoff returns, 209 yds. 

D Vlnny Testaverde, Miami (4-0) 

Quarterback, senior 

Saturday: Northern Illinois 

Last week: 28 att., 21 comp., 261 

yds., 4 TDs vs. Oklahoma; 1986: 

110 att., 66 comp., 985 yds., 10 

TDs, 5 int., 1 TD rushing 

D Lorenzo White, Michigan St. (2-1) 
Running back, junior 
Saturday: vs. Iowa 
Last week: 26 carries, 192 yds., 3 
TDs vs. W. Michigan; 1986: 91 car- 
ries, 4O0yds., 4 TDs 




Dave Spotts Is the backbone of the DVC cross 
country team. 

Athlete of the Week 

Dave Spotts, a senior from Carlisle, 
Pa., has been chosen Athlete of the 
Week by the Ram Pages sports staff. 

Dave's contributions to the DVC cross- 
country team have been no less than 
outstanding. 

Dave, out of Boiling Springs H.S. in 
Carlisle, rolled past the finish line in first 
place in last Saturday's quad meet with 
S wart h more, Philadelphia Textile, Drexel 
and Philadelphia Pharmacy. Dave has 
compiled an extraordinary record as he 
is undefeated against MAC opponents 
and undefeated at home. 

Because of his outstanding perfor- 
mance on the track and road, Dave has 
been selected Athlete of the Week. 
Congratulations! 

Current Info Now on Tap 
at Library! 

Do you need current information on a 
hot topic? Check the Library's most re- 
cent acquisition, the National Newspaper 
Index, in the Periodicals Room. 



■■■ 



HELD HOCKEY UPDATE 

by John Litzkc 

It was FDU's homecoming last Thurs- 
day October 2. The Lady Aggies visited 
FDU and for some off-the-wall reason, 
FDU cancelled their MAC matchup be- 
cause they chose to play a soccer game 
instead of having their field hockey team 
perform. So the Lady Aggies were stood 
up. 

On Saturday, October 4, Cabrini was 
the host to DVC. DVC wasn't up on 
their game on this day and, unfortunate- 
ly, Cabrini was. DVC received a goal 
from Deb Masculli from just outside the 
circle and that would be all as Cabrini 
tallied four for their 4-1 victory. 

Then on Tuesday, October 7. DVC 
played host to Wesley College of Dover, 
Delaware. Wesley is coached by a 
woman who is affectionately known as 
"Rambette." She did a lot of crying but 
her team wouldn't back her up as DVC 
throttled Wesley 4-0 on goals by left wing 
Dee Pisauro, right inner Tracy Marshall 
and a pair from left inner Bonnie David. 
It was a rough i»p and down game but 
DVC's aggressive, offensive-minded 
play put them on top. 

DVC's record stands at an even 3-3- 1 
and will play host to a tough Drew squad 
tomorrow at 4 p.m. 

EQUESTRIAN TEAM 

The Equestrian Team needs sponsors 
for their show on November 9th. See 
any Equestrian Team member. 





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Intramural Football Update: 

EMO Breaks Into 

USA Today's Top 25 



1. Miami (FL) 


5-0 


2. Alabama 


•••■*••■ %J~KJ 






4. Michigan 


........ 4-0 


5. Oklahoma 


o* 1 


6. Penn State 


........ *T~\J 


7. Aubum 


4-0 

........ ^ V 


8. Arkansas 


4-0 




....... 4-0 


10. Southern California . 


4-0 


1 1 . Iowa 


4-0 


12. Arizona State 


3-0-1 


13. Washington . 


3-1 


14. Texas A&M 


. 3-1 


15. Baylor 


4-1 


16. Louisiana State . . . . 


2-1 


17. Mississippi State . . . . 


4-1 


18. Stanford 


4-0 


19. North Carolina State 


....... 3-0-1 


20. EMO 


2-0 



21. Michigan State 2-2 

22. UCLA 2-2 

23. Indiana 4-0 

24. Clemson 3-1 

25. Georgia 3-1 

DVC's powerhouse EMO. finally got 

recognized by the pollsters and are now 
20th in the nation. 

Representation of Caritas 
Institution Here at DVC 

The Caritas Institution will hold a lun- 
cheon on October 29, 1986 with guest 
speaker Mr. Robert H. Miller, Regional 
Administrator of the U.S. Small Business 
Administration Services. The luncheon 
will be held from 11:45a.m. to 1 p.m. in 
the Student Center, Ail-Purpose Room. 
For more information about the Institu- 
tion and the luncheon please contact Dr. 
Montileone at ext. 2221. More about 
Caritas next week in Ram Pages. 



Personals 

Joan — Hope you liked the table. 

To the Judging Team — How many 
schnietzenkrubens can you eat? Is it 
twue? - "Lilly" 

Chunka Victims — None this week? 
C'mon people, let's try a little harder. 

Tim R. — It's about time, you loser. 
Great to have you back. 

Notice to all lovers who neck by Lake Ar- 
cher — Beware of the arrow-shooting 
Cupid!! Especially if you're a desperate 
goose!! 

Mets — Go all the way! 
C'mon RED SOX!! 
Lisa — Next time wake us up!! 
Val — Only when you smile. 

Mable — My room needs a cleaning. — 
Sincerely yours, The Whitehorse Men 

Norton - Watch out for those CRABS! 
— Love, Super "6" 

Peanut — No more peeping "?" on Berk 
1st!?!? 

Girls - "7": The "Duke" was great. "I" 
put out his "Fire"!!!! 

All Night Movies 216, 226, 227 Berk. 
Bring your own . . . 

Stanley — Did they give you the wrong 
movie, AGAIN????? 

PARTY IN 227!!!! 

Anthony "WAZ GONNA" - You can 
"WAZ GONNA" THIS!! 

Girls — Men: Mike, Steve, Paul, Dave, 
Chris, Brian, Mark, Hank, Anthony. 

Art — Let's find some REAL men! — 
Stanley 

Wilbert — I heard the Duke was on fire! 
Did you slip? 

Barney — Watch out for those wet-t- 
shirts. STUDY THE DATES! 

Marvin — Forget the "Fat Man," go after 
the "Thin Boys." 

At DVC: Where the women are women 
and so are the men! 

Norton — Better stop eating, only three 
weeks left. 

Marvin — I heard of roommate relations, 
but not with roommates brothers. 

Ding-Ding . . . FIRE! 

Barney — 42 out of 50 — yeah! 

Stanley — Next time use a towel, not a 
t-shirt Barney wants to wear. 

Wilbert - How's the Duke? 

Seymour — He can't kiss, huh? 

Stanley — Next time use a towel, not a 
t-shirt. Good "job" Stan and David. 

Art — The man of your dreams will be 
over soon . You know the one with egg 
yolk across his face. He wants YOU to 
eat IT!! 

"Spectacular Seven" — Girls (MEN) : Do 
you believe he "came" over after last 
week's PUB NIGHT?!?! "I DON'T BE- 
LIEVE IT." ooop! We danced. "I like 
you, I like you alot." Thanks for being 
who you all are. There is NO better. 
"We" are the "WOMEN." 

"Dolph" — Now that you know where I 
live, you can come by anytime. The 
door is always open (especially for you) . 
We party all the time. Sorry you never 
got invited over sooner. My loss. "I 
JUST COULDNT . ." Next party you 
and your friend, NEB, are going to be 
personally invited. You'll be at our next 
party, right?!?! You are HOT!!!!! I used to 
say that last year, but even MORE this 
year. 

Seymour — If we check anyone else off 
our list, who would be left?? 

Barney — So you passed an exam, final- 
ly. Now all you need is a man. But don't 
look too hard, there aren't any on this 
campus. Three for each? Well maybe 21 

MEN!!!! 



SOCCER UPDATE 

by Brett Hart 

The DVC kickers faced a tough Spring 
Garden team but showed them that the 
Aggies meant business. The first half was 
strong by both and each team scored a 
goal. Scoring for DVC was Andy Wag- 
ner. In the second half, the Aggies domi- 
nated the offense and a red and yellow 
was issued to the Spring Garden team. 
Neither could put the ball in the net and 
the game was called as a tie. 

On October 6, the father of the refrig- 
erator, dishwasher and combination 
washer-dryer celebrated his birthday. His 
name is George Westinghouse. Also on 
this day the DVC kickers visited Cabrini 
College and, like one of the Westing- 
house appliances, they took awhile to 
heat up. DVC started out slow but once 
the second half came around the Aggies 
came around too, but not enough to foil 
a strong Cabrini team who went on to 
shutout DVC 5-0. 

Last Saturday, DVC visited Albright 
and found some scoring. Winger Jeff 
Samsel opened all the scoring as he in- 
tercepted a Lions drop pass, dribbled the 
ball between two defenders and tucked 
the ball nicely into the open net for an 
early 1-0 DVC lead. Albright scored two 
before the half ended for 2-1 Lion lead. 

Freshman Phil "Rocco" Racobaldo 
hooked up for his first goal as a collegian 
off of a nice crossing pass on the part of 
all-around player Bill Van Nostrand. But 
Albright scored two of their own in the 
final half to give them the 4-2 victory. 
The losses and tie drop DVC to 1-9-1 on 
the season. 



HELP WANTED! 

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NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home away from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WiD. NIGHT: Cooler Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

/Area's Best Lunches 11 AM-3 PM 

Hoppy Hour 4-6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
3443-1968 



Cross Country Update 

On Saturday, October 4, the Cross 
Country team traveled down to Swarth- 
more College for a head-to- head battle. 
Drexel and Textile also participated in 
the meet but since both schools are in 
Division II, they did not have an effect on 
the team's overall MAC record. 

The conditions for the race on Satur- 
day were far from being favorable. The 
weather was hot and humid and the 
course was hilly and treacherous. For the 
battered up DVC team, this could only 
spell problems. However, the team 
managed to make it through the race 
without a major injury, except to their 
record. DVC was soundly defeated by 
an always strong Swarthmore team 39 to 
21 . This brought DVC's record to 4-5 for 
the season. 

DVC was able to capture first place 
with Dave Spotts running a time of 27:35 
on the 4.75 mile course. However, be- 
hind Spotts' strong performance came 
the strength of the Swarthmore team's 
pack running. They were able to capture 
2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th before DVC's sec- 
ond man, Jim Enoch, could cross the 
line. Jim finished the course in a time of 
29:45. The third man for the team was 
Gerry Kampmeyer who finished ninth. 
Tony Donofrio who was DVC's fourth 
runner finished 11th while John Thomp- 
son finished 12th and was the team's fifth 
man. Other DVC finishers included: Bill 
Brodsky and Sean Mille, who finished 
15th and 16th respectively. 

The team hopes to improve on their 
4-5 record on Saturday when they travel 
to Philadelphia and run against Philadel- 
phia Pharmacy. 

Goose, cont'd from page 1 

These incidents make me wonder 
about the mentality of some of the stu- 
dents here. I cannot imagine what it 
takes to be so unfeeling toward other 
creatures. Could it be a history of child- 
hood abuse? Maybe respect for life must 
be taught; some people might benefit 
from such a course. 

Last month, as I was walking across 
campus, I observed a sophomoric stu- 
dent chasing and throwing stones at a 
squhrel. I yelled at him, telling him to 
grow up and commenting on the maturi- 
ty of those who stone squirrels. He res- 
ponded by threatening to throw the 
squinel at me. I accepted the challenge, 
but I knew he would not follow through 
the threat because it would take guts — I 
would fight back! 



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Answer to last week's puzzle. 

STAFF 

EditorsinChief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Artist Monica Etzweiler 

Reporters Missy Brangan , Brett 

Hart, Judy Henry, John Nicholson, 

Melanie O'Neill, Cheryl Snyder, 

Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry, Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 

Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news in the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 





NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



Vol. XXI, No. 7 

Friday. October 17, 1986 



All the news 
that fits, 
we print! 



WELCOME PARENTS! 



P.L.C.B. Strikes Again 



IT'S PARENTS WEEKEND! 



by Bill Rein 

On Saturday night. September 27. a 
homecoming registered party was spon- 
sored by the Zeta Chi social club chapter 
at DVC. The intention was to celebrate 
the weekend according to the latest, 
comprehensive guidelines recently de- 
veloped by the college social board in 
cooperation with Dean of Students Mr. 
Robert Tasker. All did not go as planned; 
one of the partygoers was an undercover 
agent of the Pa. Liquor Control Board, 
who. posing as an alumni of DVC. no 
sooner charged the club with unlawful 
sale of alcoholic beverages. 

This is not the first time such an inci- 
dent has occurred; in fact, similar cir- 
cumstances developed at a registered 
party sponsored by the Landscape Nur- 
sery Club just this past March! Incredibly, 
history has repeated itself in many as- 
pects; according to Dean Tasker, on both 
occasions the L.C.B received an anony- 
mous complaint over the phone, they 
appeared at the registered party under- 
cover, both parties were quite large and 
followed the rule that tickets be sold in 
advance of the day of the party, and at 
both parties, just as they began, the agent 
produced no ticket, offered three dollars 
as a donation, and as soon as the money 
was exchanged, other agents and the 
local police appeared at the scene. At 
both parties, the ticket -taker was arrested, 
and the charges the same. 

How could this happen again, when 
new rules and regulations had been cre- 
ated as a result of the first "bust" by the 
L.C.B? Zeta Chi's people had originally 
denied the "alumni" entrance, but when 
he insisted a donation, they agreed to 
allow him to place some money in a cup 
inside. Mistake No 1: the memorandum 
distributed April 7 does state that any 
donations can only be made by DVC 



students and only up to 48 hours prior to 
the start of a registered social event. 

Nonetheless, students were reportedly 
diligently checking other products of the 
first fiasco. Wrist bands, worn by those 
21 years of age or older, to indicate their 
eligibility to be served, age cards and no 
money exchanges at the door, were rules 
which the club was found to be abiding, 
until the non-student insisted his way in- 
to the party. Entrapment? Not according 
to the agents with which the Dean has 
spoken. The L.C.B. was only answering 
its call of duty, they said. 

If not entrapment, what about the 
charge of unlawful sale of alcohol? Dean 
Tasker noted that DVC, among other 
colleges, has researched this response to 
the problem of student alcohol consump- 
tion, and have created these regulations 
to make sure that alcoholic beverages are 
not "sold," but that ticket sales are to pay 
for all aspects of the event — food, bev- 
erages, streamers and music. It seems 
that the L.C.B. is determined to put an 
end to these registered social events, 
even if they are structured similar to a 
local church or fire company's "Beef 'n 
Beer Night!" Much effort was expended 
by the college to provide such an alter- 
native to unauthorized, illegal and unsafe 
drinking parties which are a product of 
today's social scene on college campuses. 

As a result of all this, the college has 
asked for a legal opinion, and at present 
the college's attorneys are "reviewing the 
situation," said Dean Tasker. "Unfortu- 
nately, this has not helped the two stu- 
dents who have been arrested in both in- 
stances," he added. "No decision has 
been made to eliminate registered parties 
at this point. Everyone will have to follow 
our regulations — which should be within 
the scope of the law." 



Why DVC Was Founded 

by MB. 

Few people know that our founder. 
Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf. was a close 
friend of the great Russian author Leo 
Tolstoy. Rabbi Krauskopf journeyed to 
Russia in 1894. He first saw Count Tol- 
stoy working with the peasants in the 
fields of his vast estate. Amazed by his 
humility. Rabbi Krauskopf learned of 
Tolstoy's belief in having an agricultural 
society. After visiting an agricultural 
school in Russia, Tolstoy encouraged 
him to start one back home. "You have 
freedom in the United States," Tolstoy 
said, "and the most fertile soil on the face 
of the earth." With those words in mind. 
Rabbi Krauskopf returned to America 
and started an agricultural school for 
disadvantaged Jewish boys called the 
National Farm School. And that's how 
DVC came to be. 




Noted Garden Photographer 
to Speak at DVC! 

The Landscape Nursery Club is proud 
to present Mr. Derek Fell, speaking on 
"Gardens of the Delaware Valley." A 
slide show will picture the private estates 
and gardens of the Delaware Valley area 
of which Mr. Fell has an extensive pri- 
vate collection. 

Derek Fell is a noted garden photogra- 
pher/editor of many horticultural publi- 
cations. His work has been considered 
among the best in the horticulture field. 
We hope to see you on October 20th. 
6:15 p.m. in the Student Center Coffee 
House. 

All students, faculty, staff and com- 
munity are welcome to attend. 



by Bill Rein 

As. if we haven't been busy enough 
with Homecoming a few weeks ago, 
now we have to make sure we are at our 
very best for our parents! We surely hope 
they like what they see in this place some 
of us call home for nine months out of a 
year. If that dorm doesn't stand a chance 
to Mom or Dad's inspection, there are 
plenty of activities planned to distract 
them this weekend. 

For instance, if Mom and Dad are 
eager to see you and DVC and are drop- 
ping in tonight, the Class of '88 is spon- 
soring a Hayride and "Weenie" Roast 
from 6-8 p.m., behind the Admissions 
house. Here's a chance to take your 
parents out for a ride and dinner, without 
even stepping one foot outside the col- 
lege campus! 

After you've wined and dined and 
toured the campus, brush the hay off 
yourselves and take the folks back to the 

Money~For-College 

College is part of the American Dream. 
But then there's the nightmare: how 
to pay for it! This column offers some 
answers. 

"We have been unable to get financial 
help to send our granddaughter to busi- 
ness college . We are the legal guardians 
and have raised her since infancy. We 
are both retired and in our late 60's." 
(V.W.. Penn.) 

Students whose family income is gen- 
erally low are eligible for government 
grants and loans. Federally funded work- 
study programs are available at colleges 
for student income. Check with the col- 
lege financial aid office for these pro- 
grams, and for any special grants the col- 
lege administers for enrolled students. 

Another side of college financing is the 
private sector. Your granddaughter is eli- 
gible for awards based on 1) field of in- 
terest (business, and also those tagged 
for "all areas of study"); 2) being female; 
3) resident of her state or county; and 
many other features of her personal his- 
tory (religious affiliation, etc.). 

Here's a specific private sector award 
your granddaughter is eligible for: Edu- 
cational Communications Scholarship 
Foundation (Annual Scholarship Award 
Program), 721 N. McKinley Rd., Lake 
Forest, IL 60045. $1,000 award. Under- 
graduates; all fields of study. Write for 
application . 

How to find out all you are eligible for 
from the private sector? This is an enor- 
mous chore which can be shortcut by a 
computer service. For six years National 
Scholarship Research Service has com- 
piled the largest database of private 
source listings in the world, topping $8 
billion. These listings cover UNDER- 
GRADUATE, GRADUATE and OVER- 
SEAS study. For free details write: Fi- 
nancial Aid Finders, 77 Gristmill Rd.. 
Randolph, NJ 07869. 



days of sock hops and malted milkshakes 
by joining in on the 50's Dance in the 
James Work Gym from 8 p.m. -midnight. 
The lively D.J., Mary Rose, will have 
every Mom's and Dad's song, from the 
thirties to the eighties! Bring all your left- 
overs from those "Happy Days" with you 
to set the mood at this dance, which was 
coordinated by the New Parents Com- 
mittee with the Alumni Office and the 
Dean of Students Office. 

Tomorrow, your parents will not want 
to miss their opportunity to meet your 
teachers at the Parent-Teacher Re- 
ception, to be held at 9 a.m. in the Stu- 
dent Center APR. Coffee and donuts will 
be available for all. 

From 11 a.m.-4 p.m. there will be 
sports of every sort playing here on cam- 
pus. Check the schedule in "This Week 
on Campus." 

We students are sponsoring a follow- 
up Victory Celebration in the APR at 
4 p.m. Mom and Dad will be ready to 
see our spirit. There will be music and 
refreshments for your pleasure. 

Cap off the weekend by inviting your 
parents for a dinner at Chez Levin (more 
properly known as the Dining Hall). 
Mom and Dad can experience meals 
"DVC style," which they may purchase 
on a cash basis at $4.85 per person. 

Enjoy the weekend, Moms and Dads! 

This Week on ^ 
* Campus 

by Wendy L. Unger 
* FRIDAY. OCTOBER 17 * 

Hayride. 6 p.m. 

Parent/Student 50*s Dance, 8-12 p.m. 

SATURDAY. OCTOBER 18 . 

PARENTS DAY 1 
Reception for parents and faculty in 
the APR, 9 11:30 a.m. 
Vofleyball (H) vs. UpsaJa. 11 am 
Soccer (H) vs. Kings, 11 a.m. 
Luncheon m Student Center APR and 
Dining Hafl, 11:30 a.m.-l p.m. 
Field Hockey (H) vs. Montelair State, 
12 noon 

Football (H) vs. WideneT. 1:30 p.m. 

Victory Celebration in the APR, 4-7 
p.m. 

Cross Country AUentown Invitational 
(A), 12:30 p.m. 

MONDAY. OCTOBER 20 

VoBeyball (A) vs. Swarthmore and 
Allentown, 7 p.m. 

rUESDAY. OCTOBER 21 

mo Recital by Sin Sokol Mickove, 
:30-9p.m. in the APR 

WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 22 

Tarot Card Reader, 11 a.m. -2 p.m. 

Lecture: "Promises and Problems in 
Genetic Engineering," 7:30 p.m. in the 
APR 

Soccer (H) vs. Scranton, 3:30 p.m. 
Field Hockey (A) vs. Albright. 4 p.m. 
rHURSDAY, OCTOBER 23 

VofleybaB (H) vs. Muhlenberg, 7 p.m. 








Personals 

Carol — Thanks for redecorating my 

couch! 

Rebecca — Have a rough weekend?! 

Tony — You're a babe. — J. P. 

Roommate — Val who? 

Carol — Your sweater is in my room. 

Carol — Only x h a bottle to go! 

Regina — You did what? To whom? 

Chunka - Add Carol (V + O.J. + 
Lemonade) . 

Kate — He'll be back soon! 

Carol — You owe me a new couch 

cover! 

Carol — Don't worry, we still love you! 

Roommate — Your bed is growing 
cobwebs! 

John E. — Are you a lush yet? 

Tony — Can I have you? — J. P. 

Rebecca — Long Johns cost only $7 at 
K-Mart! 

Kev — Thanks for the table. 
Val — Thanks for the card. 

JoAnne & Cheryl — Thanks for this 
week. 

Tony — What are those marks on your 
neck? Vampires, huh? Halloween is on 
the 31st. 

Joan — Is it yes or is it no? 
Sis and Bro — Thanks for being such a 
supportive family. I think you had better 
cut back on Rufus's fertilizer, that foliage 
is going crazy! 

Rebecca — What happens when a Har- 
vey is put in the microwave? 
Val — What's it like that early in the 
morning? (Hint: J.E.) 
Val — Where do you want it? 
Pete G. — Are you really impotent? — 

US 

Donna — I love you. 

Hey K — How was your date? Was it 
great? Was he late? Did you have to 
wait? That's one thing I hate! By the way 
what was his name again? 

John — Sorry about what I said, but I 
would rather read the Rutger's Targum . 
— Mom 

Wink — You are welcome in our room, 
but please leave the salt shaker in your 
room. 

Dan — Your hat is still being held cap- 
tive. It is lonely, it misses you. You may 
have visiting rights; contact my lawyer. 
Tony — Is it true that you ride well? 
B114 
Kristen — You're still a mess! 

Chris — I know you have a price tag. 

How much? 

Eggie — Are you a happy camper? 

Amy & Chris — Hope you like the room; 
now it's your turn. 

John L. — Freshman aren't that bad; 

you'll get used to it. 

Julie — Is Phil a good scrump? 

To the guys in the gang — We finally got 

our phone! Why haven't you called? — 

B114 

Dan — Do your knees still hurt from the 

weekend? 

Val — Get a real stereo or at least one 
that can be fixed!!! — The Farm Hands 

Dear Jelly Roll — Do you need baby 

rails??? - The Pastry Chefs 

Don't be a Chunka victim — I never will! 

Chunka victims - Carol, 10/14, V + 

O.J. + Lemonade. Choco, 10/12, 

Should have, but didn't. 

Tim — Welcome back! Time for the 

Chunka Chart. 

Val — Only when you smile. 

Just mouthy, Cheryl. 

Chris — When was I lying? 

Katie — What did you do to JoAnne's 

car? 

JoAnne — Honest, the mirror did fall. 

Jamie — Who is Billy and what were 
you doing with him? 



collegiate crossword 




©Edward Julius Collegiate CW84-13 



ACROSS 



1 Shaves off 
6 Fernando 

11 Type of vacuum 
tube 

12 Prevents 

14 French cheese 

15 Real estate incomes 

17 Part of the sleep 
cycle 

18 Cardinal 

20 Encountered 

21 Leave out 

23 Former boxing name 

24 Yield 

25 Not good nor bad 

26 Defeat 

27 Depend 

28 Cherish 

30 Overcome with fumes 

31 Most like Jack 
Benny 

33 Attach firmly 
36 En route (3 wds.) 

40 Fall flower 

41 Kitchen utensils 

42 Regatta 

43 Russian ruler 



44 Morally low 

45 Miss Naldi 

46 Poetic contraction 

47 Town near Naples 

50 Rocky pinnacle 

51 Runs of luck 

53 Airline company 

55 Seat for two or 
more 

56 Weapons 

57 Portals 

58 Sorrow 



DOWN 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 



Pledge 

Word before fire 

Jungle noise 

Advantage 

Farmer's purchase 

(2 wds,) 

Lasso 

Comedian 

Schreiber 

8 Fix 

9 College major 

10 Flower parts 

11 Vibration 
13 hammer 



6 

7 



14 Poet Robert 

16 Spirited horse 
19 Water bird (2 wds.) 
22 Kitchen appliance 
24 Place for storing 
water 

26 Devastate 

27 Left-over con- 
coction 

29 Ending for young or 
old 

30 Understands 

32 Banking term 

33 Destinies 

34 Half of a balance 
sheet 

35 Took the leading 
role 

37 Restaurant em- 
ployees 

38 Thespians 

39 Long for 
41 Tickets 

44 Actress Carroll 

47 Roman statesman 

48 deck 

49 On the Adriatic 
52 WWII initials 

54 Feather's partner 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home awoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: Cooler Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

/Area's Best Lunches 11 AM-3 PM 

Hoppy Hour 4-6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



E 



Ginkgoes Mar 
Beautiful Campus 

Dear Editors, 

As a new faculty member, I am en- 
thralled by the natural beauty of this 
campus and the charm of its students! 
(Also, the faculty is outstanding; they're 
bright and they're effective, enthusiastic 
communicators.) 

There seems to be one blemish, though 
. . . those yellow ginkgo fruits that line 
the path to the post office. I thought 
perhaps the dairy farmers were spread- 
ing their trash on campus, at first. Could 
we not neuter these trees or arrange an 
arboreal injection of "Right Guard" so 
that the campus' beauty will pervade the 
olfactory senses as well as the eyes? 

Maybe an agricultural professor, class 
or thesis researcher can make this a 
priority project?! Hope so! 

Sincerely, 

Dr. Roberta Dimond 

Assoc. Professor of Psychology 



PACKAGE 
HANDLERS 

PART TIME 
EMPLOYMENT 

$8.00 PER HOUR 

Hours: 5 PM to 9 PM 
5 DAYS A WEEK 

UNITED PARCEL SERVICE in Willow 
Grove, PA currently has part time 
openings for Package Handlers. 
Heavy lifting is involved. 

Call for appointment Monday- Friday, 
8:30 AM to 4 PM, (215) 443-2835. EOE, 

M/F. 






m 



UNITED 
PARCEL 
SERVICE 

Willow Grova, PA 



PLACEMENT OFFICE 
INTERVIEWS FOR THE 
WEEK OF OCTOBER 20 

Monday, October 20 

U.S. MARINE CORPS 

Dining Hall from 10:45 a.m. -12:45 

p.m. 

Wednesday, October 22 

MRS. PAUL'S KITCHENS 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

SIGNUP IN THE PLACEMENT 
OFFICE FOR ALL INTERVIEWS. 



Residence Life Notes 

In case you forgot we are in the middle 
of Operation I.D., the schedule was 
posted in Ram Pages and continues 
through the end of October. See your 
Resident Assistant to get all your valu- 
ables engraved. 

In response to two articles in the paper, 
we are currently making arrangements to 
install two additional washers and dryers 
in the Segal Hall Basement. However, 
we want to let everyone know that there 
is another complete newly lighted laun- 
dromat in the basement of Ulman Hall. 
We encourage you to use these machines, 
particularly during rush times. Any prob- 
lems with the laundry facilities should be 
reported to the Residence Life Office at 
extension 2269. 

The other article mentioned the large 
mirror missing from Berkowitz Hall. 
Thanks to Patrick McNulty (R.A. in 
Wolfsohn). the mirror has been found 
and turned over to Maintenance to be re- 
hung. All maintenance problems should 
be reported to your Resident Assistant 

Student Government and the Resident 
Assistants are sponsoring a "Victory 
Celebration" on Parents' Day. They are 
running a proto type of Caesar's Pub 
immediately after the game in the All- 
Purpose Room. Please come with your 
parents 

Last Wednesday there was a meeting 
of S.A.D.D (Students Against Driving 
Drunk) . Thev art looking for some new 
people to keep this organization active 
on campus. Last year. S.A.D.D s first 
on campus, was very productive and 
now the challenge to keep up the good 
work is extended to the student body 
Stop by the Residence Life Office and 
find out more about joining S.A.D.D. 

Although we just started this semester, 
some people have inquired about R.A 
implications. The entire process will start 
near the middle of November. If you 
have any questions or suggestions about 
the Resident Assistant positions or the 
selection process, please feel free to stop 
in our office. 

SENIORS - 
HELP FOR SEMINARS 

In order to prepare for seminars, please 
see the media specialist at least two weeks 
prior to your date. Time is needed to 
schedule photo time, for developing and 
practice — not to mention possible re- 
takes. If students neglect to notify the 
Media Center until a few days prior to 
the seminar, there will be no photographs 
taken, overhead transparencies will be 
available as a substitute until the day of 
the seminar, provided media staff is 
available. 

Thank you. 
Mrs. J. Davidson 
Media Specialist 
Ext 2387 



24 hour 



PARTY LINE 

CALL 

976-TALK 



976-8255 



Talk with up to 8 
others at one time! 



• Have Fun - Eavesdrop 

• Exchange Phone Number* 

• Meet New Friend* from Other School* 

• Make Phone Data* (Tall other* exact time 

to meet oa the Una) 

• Afraid to Give Your Number Out? - 

UaeOara 

Only 25 per minute. $1 SO minimum for 6 minute* 



SPORTS WRAP-UP 




Irish Dollarton (m rear) sets for the service 

Athlete of the Week: 
Trish Dollarton 

She's great, she's competitive and 
she's a runaway truck in the eyes of 
MAC opponents who are bound for a 
head-on collision with one of her devas- 
tating spikes, she's Trish Dollarton Our 
athlete of the week is a sophomore from 
Bishop Kenrick H.S.. where she played 
volleyball for three years, and she resides 
in Norristown. Pa Trish is the backbone 
of our emerging volleyball program Her 
spikes and serves send shivers down op- 
ponents spines and Trish's enthusiasm on 
the court is surpassed by few. Trish is also 
a member of the DVC varsity women's 
basketball team so we can expect big 
things from her this winter as well. For 
these reasons. Trish has been selected 
Athlete of the Week Congratulations. 



by John Litzke 

• Here are some strange but true base- 
ball stats that may have you smiling: 

— Reds pitcher John Franco bumped 
all four umpires while arguing a call. 

— Alejandro Sanchez finally drew the 
first walk of his big-league career 
after five seasons, four teams, two 
leagues and 208 appearances to the 
plate. 

— Dave Lapoint gave up two grand 
slams in a span of six hitters. 

— Alfredo Griffin stole home from sec- 
ond base 

— "Mr. Good" Steve Garvey was 
ejected from a game for the first 
time in his career. What did Mommy 
have to say Steve? 

— Willie McGee had an at-bat against 
Fernando Valenzuela that went this 
way: wild pitch, wild pitch, passed 
ball, hit batter. 

— And probably the greatest stolen 
base in history occurred on the last 
day of the 1986 season. 23-year 
veteran Phil Niekro had one thing 
missing from his list of achieve- 
ments, so in the eighth inning of the 
final game of the season, Phil bolted 
out of the dugout, while the game 
was going on. headed straight for 
second base, dove in with a head 
first slide, the umpire gave him the 
safe signal, Phil picked up second 
base and returned to the dugout 
and received a standing ovation. 
What a feat! 

• The World Series is shaping up and it 
looks like Met Mania will continue as 
the Red Sox's come into New York 
Saturday for the first game. Secure the 
buildings in New York City for the Mets 



Cross Country Update 

DVC BLANKS 

PHILADELPHIA PHARMACY 

It was a decisive victory for the Harriers 
of DVC as they went up against Philadel- 
phia Pharmacy in a dual meet on Satur- 
day, October 11. The team traveled 
down to Philadelphia hoping for a victory 
and they were not disappointed. The 
team was only able to take six members to 
the race, but these six were able to do the 
job quite well. 

DVC was able to place ALL SIX of 
their runners across the finish line before 
Pharmacy's first man could come across 
the line. After the race was finished DVC 
came out on top by a score of 15 to 45. 

Dave Sports once again won the race 
in a time of 28:50. Gary Kampmeyer 
finished second in a time of 31:02. The 
next four places which were captured by 
DVC were Jim Enoch 3rd, Tony Donofrio 
4th. Sean Miller 5th and Bill Brosky 6th. 
The team's next meet will be on Saturday. 
October 18 at Allentown in the Allentown 
Invitational. 




5-0 VICTORY PUTS DVC 
IN MAC HUNT 

by John Litzke 

From the press box point of view it 
seemed the Upsala fans were more in- 
terested and more enthusiastic about the 
Mets score than the football game at 
hand. 

But the Aggies gave DVC something 
to be happy about as DVC eeked out a 
victory in East Orange 5-0 on a safety set 
up by a marvelous blocked punt by de- 
fensive end Chuck Heiber and the result- 
ing ball rolling out of the end zone and a 
nicely done 26-yard field goal by kicker 



John Ford. I had to keep telling the guy 
from The Philadelphia Inquirer that it 
most definitely was a football score and 
not a soccer or hockey score. It made me 
laugh. 

With the 5-0 victory Saturday, DVC 
now stands at 2-2-1 overall and 2-1-1 in 
the MAC and could breathe down the 
neck of Juniata and send their shorts 
ariding with a victory over Widener 
tomorrow. 

The offense was quite impressive last 
Saturday as they rolled up 215 total 
yards — 151 rushing (Jim Wilson 28 for 
89 yards) and 64 passing (Clay Butter- 
worth eight of 19, two interceptions and 
64 net yards). The defense was finely 
tuned once again as they preserved the 
shutout with a ton of heavy hits and 
crushing sacks were registered by defen- 
sive tackle Steve D'Ambra, linebacker 
Greg Currie and defensive end Seamus 
McGlone. Cornerback Mike Heisy had 
a fine afternoon as he collected two 
interceptions. 

Head coach Al Wilson had these com- 
ments about the victory last Saturday: "I 
was happy with our performance today. 
We've shown that if we score some 
points, the defense, because it is playing 
so well, will keep us in the game." 

Leading the way for the Vikings was 
all-purpose back Mark Luisi. 




W 



|A2-Up 




The DVC passing game has been steadily improving week after week. 



L I T Z K E ' S SPORTS' BRIEFS 



celebration may register on the Richter 
scale. 

• Flyers are out of the gates early with 
2-1 and 6-1 victories over Edmonton 
and Washington respectively. Rookie 
goalie Ron Hextall looks like vintage 
Parent. 

• Penn State's Shane Conlin, Oklaho- 
ma's Brian Bosworth and Alabama's 
Cornelius Bennet are among the 16 
collegiate players in the running for the 
prestigious Butkus Award to be given 
December 15. 

• Sixers look a tad unorganized in their 
122-106 exhibition loss to Boston in 
the Garden last Friday. A very, very, 
very, bright sign was Andrew Toney 
who had 22 points. The rest of the Six- 
ers exhibition schedule looks this way: 
Utah 10/13 Houston 10/23 
Denver 10/15 Milwaukee 10/24 
Dallas 10/16 New Jersey 10/27 
Portland 10/18 

• In high school football this past week it 
was: 

W. Philadelphia 42, Overbrook 6 
Frankford 14, Washington 13 
Northeast 16. ML. King 14 
Bartram 34, Germantown 18 
Southern 36. University City 6 
Olney 8, Mastbaum 
Central 38, Edison 6 
C.B. West 16, Neshaminy 14 
North Penn 24, William Tennent 7 
Pennridge 33, Bensalem 13 
Norristown 14, Truman 7 
Upper Merion 28, Springfield 7 
C.B East 21, Pennsbury 2 
Methacton 14. Wissahickon 6 
St. John Neu. 21, Card. O'Hara 16 
Card. Dougherty 13, N. Catholic 7 
Msgr Bonner 30, Roman Catholic 7 



• In college football action last weekend 
it was: 

Pitt 10, Notre Dame 9 
Georgia Tech. 59, N.C. St. 21 
Auburn 31, Vanderbilt 9 
Oklahoma 47. Texas 12 
SMU 27, Baylor 21 
UCLA 32. Arizona 25 
Air Force 40. Navy 6 
Michigan 27, Michigan St. 6 
Miami. FL 58. W. Virginia 14 
Alabama 37, Memphis St. 
Penn St. 23. Cincinnati 17 
Florida St. 54. Tulane 21 
Florida 52. Kent St. 9 

• In games of interest last Saturday, it 
was: 

Wilkes 14, Moravian 
Villanova 52, Fordham 14 
Temple 45, E. Carolina 28 
(Temple's Paul Palmer: 43 carries, 349 
yds., 3TD's; 413 total yds.) 
Susquehanna 28, Widener 13 
Lebanon Valley 10, FDU 6 
Kutztown 28, E. Stroudsburg 
Kings Point 20. Gettysburg 13 
Juniata 30. W. Maryland 13 
Delaware St. 32. Connecticut 31 
Catholic 6, Duquesne 6 
W. Chester 37, Edinboro 9 
Penn 34. Brown 

• Retired Detroit Tiger great Norm Cash 
drowned while in his boat in Lake 
Michigan . Norm was the batting champ 
in 1961 and spent 15 years at first base 
with the Tigers. 

• In week *6 of the pro football season it 
was: 

NY. Giants 35. Philadelphia 3 
Dallas 30, Washington 6 
Chicago 20, Houston 7 
Denver 31, San Diego 14 



NY. Jets 31, New England 24 
LA. Raiders 14, Seattle 10 
New Orleans 17, Indianapolis 14 
Miami 27, Buffalo 14 
Cleveland 20, Kansas City 7 
Atlanta 26, L. A. Rams 14 
Detroit 21, Green Bay 14 
St. Louis 30, Tampa Bay 19 
Minnesota 27, San Francisco 24 
Cincinnati 24, Pittsburgh 22 

• On Sunday's schedule we have: 
Dallas at Philadelphia 
Chicago at Minnesota 

Green Bay at Cleveland 
Houston at Cincinnati 
Indianapolis at Buffalo 
LA. Raiders at Miami 
New England at Pittsburgh 
St. Louis at Washington 
San Francisco at Atlanta 
Tampa Bay at New Orleans 
Detroit at LA. Rams 
NY. Giants at Seattle 
San Diego at Kansas City 
Monday night: Denver at NY. Jets 

• John McEnroe seems to have returned 
to his old form as he defeated Kevin 
Curren in the final of the Scottsdale 
Open in Arizona. McEnroe defeated 
Curren 6-3, 3-6, 6-2 to win the 
$279,000 prize. 

• Redskins waive Mark Mosley. 38, a 
14-year veteran with Washington. 
Mosley played an integral part in the 
'82 and '83 Super Bowl teams and was 
named Most Valuable Player in '82. 

• In other NBA news. Mark Price, rookie 
out of Georgia Tech, signed with 
Cleveland and Walter Berry, rookie 
out of St. Johns, agreed to terms with 
Portland. 




Sports Quiz 

QUESTION #6: 

In Super Bowl IX, the Pittsburgh 
defense limited the Minnesota Vik- 
ings to Just 119 yards in total offense. 
Name the starting defense for Pitts- 
burgh who became affectionately 
known as the "Steel Curtain?" 

We have a winner! Yeah! Congratula- 
tions to Paul Leinbach who correctly 
answered the question: Who am I? I 
played wide receiver from 1964 to 1980 
(mostly with the Miami Dolphins) . I was 

given the nickname "Mr. Un ." 

I ran the low hurdles at Ohio State and 
was a wide receiver for Woody Hayes. 
The correct answer that Paul gave was, 
Paul Warfield and for his winning answer 
Paul received a coupon for a free Aggie 
burger, fries and soda from Caesar's 
Pub. The next winner could be you so 
play today! 

If you know the answer to this week's 
question, place your answer, name and 
box number on a slip of paper and put in 
Box 951 and if your correct answer is 
drawn you could be a winner too. 

NOT HUNTERS 

Dear Editors, 

In response to the October 10 article, 
"Goose, Victim of Campus Violence," I 
totally agree that it was a thoughtless, ir- 
responsible act. The thing that bothers 
me is the fact that the people who wrote 
these articles about the goose, which was 
a very worthwhile item to bring into the 
open , is that they used the word HUNT- 
ER. A better word to describe the indi- 
viduals would be a SLOB. These people 
aren't hunters or sportsmen who do this 
type of thing. 

There are too many people who don't 
realize that America's hunters are the 
leading conservationists in the country. 
We, as hunters, have contributed to the 
game species, the state game lands and 
most importantly, the endangered species, 
to the amount of well over a billion dol- 
lars, to preserve and protect the beauty 
of nature. 

So please, when an incident like this 
occurs again, please don't use the word 
"hunter." use the proper description, a 
SLOB 

Sincerely. 
Lome Bacher 

Bike Travel in One Day 

Last Sunday, Dan Paulus and Ann 
Whitesell completed a century bike ride 
(100 mi.). Dan complete his in seven 
hours, flat, and Ann completed hers in 
eight and one-quarter hours. The course 
encompassed Perkasie. the upper Bucks 
region including Riegelsville, and even 
some of New Jersey. It was a hilly ride. 

Interested in those long, beautiful 
routes through the countryside, or just a 
jaunt across campus? You too can be- 
come a centurist by contacting Ann or 
checking the yellow bulletin board. 



DREW, WIDENER 
FACE DVC HOCKEY 

by John Litzke 

Eleanor Roosevelt, the well-known 
first lady and wife of Franklin Delano, 
celebrated her birthday on Saturday and 
the first ladies of field hockey took on 
sixth ranked Drew University and, accor- 
ding to head coach Pam Spotts, played 
their best game this season, but fell to the 
Lady Rangers 1-0 in a thriller. DVC 
worked very well together as a team on 
Saturday, used short, crisp passes and 
opened up many opportunities for 
themselves but just couldn't capitalize. 

Against Widener on Monday, a light 
drizzle fell the entire way but it didn't 
dampen the competitive spirit of DVC. 
After the initial goal was scored by the 
Lady Pioneers it was DVC's turn. Left 
wing Dee Pisauro, on an assist by co- 
captain Tina Drey, found the net with a 
blistering shot to tie it at one late in the 
second half. DVC, once again, had nu- 
merous opportunities to score but failed 
to put it home. Widener, on a penalty 
stroke put the winning goal in very late in 
the game to give them the victory. 
Goalie Lynn Schumack or Schmuck, as 
she is affectionately called, played out- 
standing in both contests. 

The ladies record fell to 3-5- 1 with five 
games remaining. Scranton visited on 
Wednesday and Montclair State will visit 
tomonow at noon. 

GET CONNECTED WITH 

THE NEW CAMPUS LINE 

CALL 976-TALK (8255) 

Meet new friends from other schools, 
find out where the parties are this week- 
end, make "phone dates" (tell new ac- 
quaintances the exact time to meet on 
the talk line again), exchange phone 
numbers, have fun eavesdropping or 
join in the fun. Whatever way you use it. 
976-TALK is the latest rage sweeping the 
country. It's a new way to have some 
great fun on the telephone. It's like an 
old-fashioned party line from the past, 
with the addition of many more people 
on the line. 

976-TALK is a new unique way to 
make new friends, using the telephone 
to check-out who you want to be friends 
with. It's the first and only one available 
in the area where up to eight callers are 
connected together in conversation. The 
success of the caller having a good con- 
versation depends upon how many 
others are on the line. 

Here's how it works. When a caller 
dials 976-TALK (8255) they first hear a 
brief introduction and then are con- 
nected to a maximum of seven other 
callers, for a total of six minutes, aftei 
which they are disconnected from the 
line. The charge for the service is .25 per 
minute with a six-minute maximum for a 
total of $1.50. 

HOW DO YOU AVOID DRIVING 
WITH A DRUNK/DRUGGED 
DRIVER ? 



VORDS UNLIMITED 

Typing/Word Processing Services 

Resumes • Cover Letters 

failings * Term Papers * Theses 

Dissertations 

PICK-UP & DELIVERY! 

Need something typed? 
CALL >46-9776. 




DVC's S.A.D.D. (Students Against 
Driving Drunk) needs your help. 
Stop In the Residence Life Office to 
find out more about S.A.D.D. 



Widener Sees Stars; 

Volleyball Ousted By 

Kings Monday 2-0 

by John Litzke 

There were two red hot events occur- 
ring back on Wednesday, October 8. 
Back on October 8, 1871 the great Chi- 
cago fire left the city a pile of burning, 
ashen ruins. One hundred and fifteen 
years later, the DVC volleyball team 
acted as a match and Widener was the 
paper. Last Wednesday night the Lady 
Pioneers visited James Work Gym and 
DVC gave them third degree burns as 
the ladies scorched Widener, who 1 must 
say gave a very anemic looking perfor- 
mance, 15-1, 15-1, 15-2. 

It was a fine, all-around team perfor- 
mance by DVC. Some outstanding ef- 
forts were contributed by setter Vicki 
Keener who was as consistent as always 
and made some fine saves. Donna Brad- 
ley also had a good game with some 
very fine service winners and good net 
play. Although DVC was much taller, 
stronger and deeper than Widener the 
Lady Pioneers gave it their best and both 
teams looked like they were having fun. 
which is the name of the game. 

DVC was supposed to play in the 
Dickinson Tourney this past weekend, 
but due to a last minute schedule 
change, DVC didn't receive an invita- 
tion. You could hear a gigantic sigh out 
of each of the opposing teams, the sigh 
was so loud you could hear it right here 
at DVC. because they knew they wouldn't 
have to go up against Bradley. Dollar- 
ton, Keener, Chapman. Hajioannou 
and company. 

In a best out of three match on Friday, 
October 10. DVC fell to Kings College 
2-0. "We just didn't play the type of 
game we're capable of playing." said 
senior setter Vicki Keener. This puts 
DVC at a very respectable 5-4 with 
tough MAC matchups to come. 

EAGLES TICKETS 

Tickets for the Philadelphia Eagles — 
NY. Giants game, November 9 are on 
sale now. in the Dean of Students Office. 
The price is $14. This includes transpor- 
tation by bus. to and from Vet. Stadium 
Sponsored by the Student Government 

Richard Leakey Lecture 

World-renowned paleoanthropologist . 
Richard E. Leakey will visit The Universi- 
ty Museum on Saturday, November 8, 
1986 at 8 p.m., when he speaks on 
"The Origins of Humankind" in the 
Museum's Harrison Auditorium. 

Richard E. Leakey. Director of the Na- 
tional Museums of Kenya, will discuss 
the latest fossil discoveries and their im- 
plications for the evolution of modern 
humans at a special Centennial Lecture, 
part of the Centennial Celebration of The 
University Museum of Archaeology/ An- 
thropology. University of Pennsylvania 
Leakey, who carries forward the work 
begun by his famous father Louis Leakey, 
will comment on the 2.5-million-year-old 
skull of a man-like creature found last 
year near Lake Turkana in Northern 
Kenya, and will explain some of the con- 
troversial theories sunounding its place 
in human evolution. 

A champagne reception for Leakey 
will follow the lecture. 

Autographed copies of Leakey's books 
will be sold before and after the lecture. 

Tickets to the lecture (limited to 800) 
are $17.50 and $12.50 for non-mem- 
bers, $15 and $10 for Museum members. 
Tickets for the champagne reception 
(limited to 250) are $20. 

For further information and reserva- 
tions, call 215/ 898-3024. 

The University Museum is located at 
33rd and Spruce Streets. 



Boyle Runs and Passes 
E.M.O. to Victory 

Chris "Heisman Hopeful" Boyle ran 
for two touchdowns and threw for three 
more leading E.M.O. to an easy 39-0 
victory over the Lap Sappers. Boyle's 
touchdowns were to Tim Brennan who 
had two and the other one to Mike 
Zendt. The offensive line was outstand- 
ing once again in protecting Boyle. Pro- 
tecting Boyle is Steve Botto, Steve 
Smyth and Sean McGrath. The defense 
was lead by Cy Rother with four inter- 
ceptions. Jim Bauzon with one intercep- 
tion, Vinny Pastore with one interception 
and Steve Botto with one interception 
also. The reason for all the interceptions 
was the great pressure put on the quar- 
terback. Leading the E.M.O. sack ex- 
change was Wayne Lutz. E.M.O. is now 
3-0. Also, they are ranked in USA To- 
day's Top 25. 

E.M.O. MOVES UP IN 
USA TODAYS TOP 25 

DVC's powerhouse E.M.O. moved 
up five spots after their big victory of 
39-0 over the Lap Sappers. 

1 . Miami (FL) 6-0 

2 Alabama 6-0 

3. Nebraska 5-0 

4 Michigan 5-0 

5. Oklahoma . . 4-1 

6. Auburn . 5-0 

7 Per,nStn<? 5-0 

8. Iowa 5-0 

9. Arizona State 4-0-1 

10. Washington 4-1 

11. Texas A&M 4-1 

12. Louisiana State . 3-1 

13. Arizona 4-1 

14. Arkansas 4-1 

15 E.M.O 3-0 

16 Southern California . 4-1 

17 North Carolina . . 4-0-1 

18. Clemson .:..... 4-1 

19. UCLA 3-2 

20 Stanford 4-1 

21. Baylor 4-2 

22. Southern Methodist 4-1 

23 Ohio State 4-2 

24 Air Force 5-1 

25. Indiana 4-1 



HEISMAN WATCH 

Chris Boyle. E.M.O. (3-0) 

Quarterback, senior 

Tuesday: Alman Brothers 

Last week: 20 att.. 15 comp.. 250 

yds.. 3 TDs; 1986: 65 att.. 49 

comp.. 8(H) yds.. 11 TDs. 3 int.. 5 

TD rushing 



HELP WANTED! 

$60 per hundred paid 
for remailing letters from home! 

Send self-addressed, 

stamped envelope for 

information/application to: 

ASSOCIATES 

Box 95 B, Roselle, NJ 07203 



STAFF 

Editors-in-Chief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Artist Monica Etzweiler 

Reporters Mike Bolles, Missy 

Brangan, Brett Hart, Judy Henry, John 

Nicholson. Melanie O'Neill. Cheryl 

Snyder, Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry. Anne Shobert. 

Mr Edward O'Brien. 

Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news In the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 





IDtiflfflwSBSte W!to (M10@g@ 



Vol. XXI. No. 8 

Friday, October 24. 1986 




NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



All the news 
that fits, 
we print! 



DVC Horticulture Produce Sales: 
The Sweet Smell of Success 



by Annmarie Whitesell 

One of the major contributions to the 
Delaware Valley College campus this 
semester and this past summer is the 
produce stand on Route 202. The suc- 
cess story with the stand is the people 
who make it work; the students who 
work for the Horticulture Department 
and the orchard production manager. 
Scott Robertello. To get the latest on 
what's happening in the orchard and the 
improvement in marketing DVC produce, 
I met with Mr. Robertello after a typical 
twelve-hour day. 

RAM PAGES: Can you tell me how old 
the trees in the orchard are? 
SCOTT: The oldest trees that are still pro- 
ducing are the fifty-four year old apple 
trees that Dr. Feldstein tended when he 
was a student here at DVC. 
RAM PAGES: Is it true that there was an 
old produce stand back in the 1950's? 
SCOTT: Yes. at one time DVC had a 
produce stand. From what 1 understand 
it was discontinued because of protest from 
local farmers. 

RAM PAGES: I understand you've been 
working for three years as orchard mana- 
ger. Have you seen any improvements? 
SCOTT: Yes. we have increased produc- 
tivity in our apple crop by about six to ten 
fold. The increase is due to the young 
apple trees coming into production. Our 
other crops are improving because of 
better agricultural techniques. Another 
area that has been improved is the diver- 
sity of crops that are now being grown in 
the orchard. 

RAM PAGES: When you say more diver- 
sity of crops, what crops does this include. 
SCOTT: We have peaches and apples 
which are well-known, but we also have 
pears, grapes, nectarines, sweet cherries, 
apricots, strawberries, raspberries, and 
blueberries. We also grow many vegeta- 
bles; i.e. . sweet corn, egg plant, peppers, 
cucumbers, zuccini, watermelon, peas, 
beans, broccoli, and cauliflower. (Stop- 
ping to catch a breath, Scott continued 
on.) Many of these fruits and vegetables 
were planted so the students could have 
hands-on-experience with different crop 
techniques and growing procedures. 




Sales of DVC's own produce, such as this 
season's finest apples and cider, have increased 
tremendously with the route 202 stand 



RAM PAGES: What is happening in the 
orchard right now? 

SCOTT: We planted three acres of 
peaches; next year we will plant five 
more acres. We are also mapping out 
plans for a larger planting because of the 
demand for more produce at the stand 
on Route 202. 

RAM PAGES: Are there any experiments 
going on out in the orchard? 
SCOTT: There is a new amino acid-based 
fertilizer being tested for an outside com- 
pany. Dr. Vincent and Dr. Cordrey are 
in charge of the experiment. 
RAM PAGES: Does the research bring 
in any money for the Horticulture Depart- 
ment? 

SCOTT: The college automatically re- 
ceives one-third of the payment for use 
of the land. The other two-thirds is divided 
for updating equipment and repairs and 
anything else that the college feels is 
necessary to replace or fix. 
RAM PAGES: Earlier you stated that 
you are going to plant an increase in dif- 
ferent crops and that you are having an 
increase in apple and peach production. 
What are you doing with all this produce? 
SCOTT: Since moving back to Route 202 
we have increased our business by seven 
fold. This means that everything that we 
have grown over the past summer and 
this fall has been sold! 
RAM PAGES: Can you give me any rea- 
sons why the increase has been so great? 
SCOTT: First of all, the location is in a 
prime marketing spot. Anything that we 
place out on the stand is sold within the 
day. Another reason for the Horticulture 
Department's success with the stand is 
that we are gearing up to meet the de- 
mand of the customer. We try to teach 
the student that you must be professional 
in dealing with the public. The customer 
is in a hurry, so you must take their order 
quickly, be able to answer the customer's 
questions about the product and make 
sure to treat them as individuals so that 
they come back. Finally, the quality of our 
produce cannot be beaten by any super- 
market or many local produce stands. 
Our produce is top quality because the 
vegetables and fruit are picked the day 
they are sold or just a day or two before- 
hand. 

RAM PAGES: At this time, can you tell 
us how much money the stand makes? 
SCOTT: 1 am really not at liberty to say 
how much money the stand makes, but I 
do want to straighten out a major miscon- 
ception. Most people are under the im- 
pression that "the stand" brings in money 
only to the Horticulture Department. All 
of the money that we make goes back to 
the school. I am given a budget every 
year from the school to use in the orchard 
and on the produce stand; that is the only 
money we use. 

RAM PAGES: Does this mean that you 
will not consider other departments or 
club items to sell? 

SCOTT: Right now the idea of selling 
other products at the stand sounds good, 
but you have to remember that the 
customer likes a dependable supplier. 



What if one week we have something 
that sells really well, and then it's not 
there for the next two weeks? What do 
you tell the customer? "Sorry, we don't 
have it?" The customer will say goodbye 
and they'll find some place else to buy 
their produce. 

RAM PAGES: What other plans do you 
have for the future of the stand? 
SCOTT: A major goal for the Horticulture 
Department is to get a permanent 
building built as a produce stand along 
Route 202. It will take a lot of work, but I 
believe it will be worth the money and 
time. 

RAM PAGES: Is there anything else you 
would like to tell us? 
SCOTT: Yes, 1 would like to say that 
without the help of the students, the or- 
chard and stand could never have been 
so successful. The students make it 
work. 




The steps to success begin in the orchard . . . 

Social Weekend at DVC 

by Annmarie Whitesell 

Parent's Day Weekend shone brightly 
on the DVC campus. The college, stu- 
dent government, and class officers ran 
many activities. The events were any- 
where from a 50's dance to Powder Puff 
Football on Sunday It's been said, that 
on campus there is nothing to do on 
weekends. (So the ugly rumor goes.) 
Well, if you did not enjoy this weekend 
at DVC it was your own fault. 

Friday night's hayride sponsored by 
the class of '88 was a blast. The hayride 
started out at Admissions and finally 
ended at the Beehouse. Along the way 
there was the kidnapping of Dr. Berthold 
and the usual hay fights. Later Friday 
evening the new Parents Association 
along with the college, sponsored a 50's 
dance. I must say the student turnout 
was meager, but the parents and students 
who were there rocked-n-rolled until the 
midnight hour. 

Saturday was the prime time for the 
folks to meet the profs. Then it was off to 
a special luncheon and the home football 
game. After the game, the RA's and Stu- 
dent Government sponsored a Victory 
Celebration in the Student Center. Satur- 
day night, the Senior class had their Pig 
Roast. And finally to cap the weekend 
off the girls on campus had a Powder Puff 
Football game on Sunday. 

Weekends don't come any better than 
this one! 



Apiary Society Update 

The DVC Apiary Society is involved 
in honey bee activities both on and off 
campus, and its membership is made up 
of both students with beekeeping back- 
grounds and those with no prior interest 
in the honey bee . Its meetings are open 
to all members of the college community, 
and if you are interested in attending any 
of its informal meetings, keep an eye out 
for the hexagon-shaped signs. 

The club has already been quite active 
this year. During one of its first meetings, 
the club members extracted part of the 
college's honey crop. The remainder of 
the crop will be extracted sometime after 
Thanksgiving, and anyone interested in 
participating is invited to attend. Other 
meetings included the showing of an ex- 
cellent movie dealing with honey bees; 
processing honey: and marketing honey. 

The club's next meeting will be on 
Thursday, October 30, 1986 at 7 p.m. at 
the Bee House across the railroad tracks 
from Berkowitz Hall. The program will 
be a candle-making workshop in which 
club members and any other members of 
the college community may come and 
make a beeswax candle for themselves 

On Thursday, November 13, 1986 at 
8 p.m., in the lobby of Mandell Hall, the 
club will be hosting and judging the An- 
nual Bucks County Honey Show. Every- 
one is invited to attend and take part in 
the judging. 

The club has many types of honey bee 
products on sale. Since each flower pro- 
duces a distinctive flavored and colored 
honey, the club has available clover, 
orange blossom, eucalyptus, buckwheat, 
and wildflower liquid honeys plus finely 
crystallized honey spreads to which have 
been added dried apricots, cinnamon, or 
freeze dried raspberries or strawberries. 
This year the club also has available comb 
honey and chunk honey (a piece of 
honey comb in a jar surrounded by liquid 
honey). The spreads make an excellent 
substitute for jams and jellies. The club 
also has available pure beeswax tapered 
candles and pure beeswax honey bear 
candles. The various types of honey are 
great for snacking, and the honeys and 
candles are nice to take home to your 
parents and also to use as gifts for the 
holiday season. All products are available 
from club members; the book store also 
carries a limited line of the honey products. 

Hope to see you at our future meetings. 
This week is National Honey Week! 
Really! 



• * PRESS RELEASE • • 

If the person who is taking the Inquirer 
which is delivered to the Library each 
Sunday morning continues to do so, the 
subscription will be stopped. The 

Library periodicals budget, intended for 
the purchase of materials of interest to 
many readers, cannot afford to subsi- 
dize the irresponsibility of one selfish 
individual. 

Mrs. Shook 



Personals 

Lome Bacher — Three cheers for your 
letter in last week's Ram Pages! It's about 
time somebody got that point across. — 
Karen Doyle 

Nate — How's the apple business? Find 
any peaches yet? 

Michelle — Catch up on your sleepage 
this week. So maybe your car chunkage 
this weekend. 

Rach - P.P. Football Tackle! This week 
DVC, next week Chicago Bears. No 
pain, no gain! — K 

Hey P.P. Football Guys, 10-2, I think 
you need to recruit for this Sunday. 
Remember 1 p.m.! 

Daryll - You smell "BEAUTIFUL!" - K 
&M 

Lewy — Open for business! What kind of 
business? — Karen Vincent 

Jamie R. — Four guys in one week (two 
at the Pub) and you're still a virgin? Out- 
rageous!! — Mother Superior 

Katie — My mirror is dead, and you will 
be shortly! — Roommate 

Val — My price tag is out of your league! 

— Alfred Dunhill. Ltd., London 

Katie — Don't make a mountain out of a 
molehill. 

Julie — What seems to be the problem? 

Chrissy F. — You know, I think he's still 
sweet, but his roommate is a weasel! — 
Your drinking pal 

Chipmunk — Have you seen any fish 
swimming up stream lately? I'll take you 
fishing one day in 228. You can tell 
everyone about the one that got away. 

— Your Roomie 

Yoda — I'm sorry. Master Fang has not 
taught me as well. When does the red 
light district go back into operation? I'll 
buy the red cellophane. — Sleezestack 

Helen — If you break the towel rack he'll 
be back. Twenty-three is a nice age. You 
break it, he'll fix it. — Guess Who 

Ivy — Congrats on the grades. ID. + 
D.G. = B. You've been around your 
roommate too long. I guess that formula 
works all the time. — Your ID. user 

Mark V. — Next time, get chaps that 
aren't so tight! — Co-Capt. 

To the Western Team — I want my rib- 
bon! And if that Penn State woman 
doesn't shut up . . . 

Kirsten & Julie — You owe us at least 
one six pack each. — J.. J., and C 

John — Is your flamingo really pink? — 
Kirsten 

Those who stay out all night to play, 
shouldn't be concerned about where the 
R.A. is anyway. 

Chunka Victims — John L. Oct. 17 B; 
Joell Oct. 17 B.. T.. IC; Jamie Oct. 17 
B; Tony D. Oct. 17 B.. T. 

Val — Still only when you smile. 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 
INTERVIEWS FOR THE 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 27 

•v 

Tuesday, October 28 

DVC DAIRY INTERNSHIP 
Must be sophomore, junior or senior, 
have a 2.5 or higher GPA. ALL AG 
MAJORS WELCOME TO SIGN UP 
Interviews from 10 a.m. -12 noon. 

Wednesday, October 29 

AMERICAN BREEDERS SERVICE 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m 

Friday, October 31 

DVC DAIRY INTERNSHIP 

See above for details. 

Interviews from 10 a.m.- 12 noon. 

SIGNUP IN THE PLACEMENT 
OFFICE FOR ALL INTERVIEWS. 



Barness Hall R.A.s Are Doing Just Fine 



Dear Editors, 

I am writing in response to the editorial 
on "R.A.s in Absentia," obviously written 
by some close-minded, negative person. 

The two girls that were depicted in the 
editorial are two friends of mine. The 
R.A.s names who were so rudely torn 
apart are Beth Meny and Lisa Roerig 
However, putting aside my friendship 
with these two girls, there are a few facts 
you overlooked. 

First, we have been back to school for 
approximately 60 days. Out of those 60 
days, the Livestock Judging Team has 
been gone for a grand total of 11 days. 
Poor lost souls, unattended for 11 days 
— oh no! 

Second, the R.A. downstairs, Brenda, 
was on duty September 10 to September 
14 while the Judging Team was away on 
their (not so occasional) trips. The letter 
to the editors said, "One R.A. for an en- 
tire dorm is just not enough." If you have 
been aware of what has been going on 
for the past three years you have been 
here, we have one R.A. on duty each 
weekend. This allows the other R.A.(s) 
to lead a normal life and occasionally go 
home, if they choose. Do they have to 
be chained to their rooms? Maybe you 
never get out. 

Third. I find it a shame that, at your 
age, you feel it necessary to have some- 
one watching over you. It is quite ob- 
vious that you have a mouth. A sugges- 
tion: if something happens in the dorm, 
why don't you use it (your mouth) to get 
the problem out. I have, it works. 

Fourth, maybe you'd be better off if 
you stopped minding other people's 
business. This is probably not the first 
time you have made false accusations 
and judgments. (Leave the judging to 
the Team, they are good at it.) You sug- 
gested in your letter that the R.A.'s 
roommates should become R.A.'s. Sorry, 
this won't work either; Beth Meny's 
roommate is on the Judging Team too. 
Try again. 

Finally, and certainly not of least im- 
portance. The DVC Livestock Judging 
Team consists of seven students. These 
students possess a talent I wish I had. 
Need 1 remind you, the Livestock Judg- 
ing Team is one of the two teams on 
campus which represent the college on a 
national level. 1 am very proud to send 
them off and represent DVC. So instead 
of being negative all the time, try looking 
at the good points in life, you might be a 
happier person. 

I always find it funny how people can 
criticize someone and not admit to it. 1 
don't know who you are. I have a good 
idea, only because you have made false 
judgments about me too. I'm not afraid 
to stand behind how I feel. You know 
where to find me. just down the hall a 
bit. 

Sincerely, 
Julie Myers 

To the Judging Team: The best of luck to all seven 
of you at Nationals. November 13-19. oh no. 
seven days Knock'em dead. I will too if anything 
goes wrong here. 



■ P ARE Sill A M A Si. 


'It r i o d eHa vertsI 


: R M A G I. II R E N T A L S 

R E Mi 1 E I) B I R DilM L T 


M I ' |c L A YliC E D F. 


SOS oBr U 1 «H INGE 


E A S U R EfeBG A S S 1 


"JWllS T I N G I E S JEM*. 


F A S T E NBO N T H E W A Y 


A S T E F MP T SjlR A C F. 


T S A F MB A S Ei |N I T A 


E E R ■IC A S E R T AliT R 
STREAK S||E ASTERN 


,*; E T T E EHS PEAR!^ 


llDOORS Ml E A R Sin 



Dear Editors, 

As residents of Barness Hall second 
floor, we resent last week's Dear Editors 
letter "R.A.'s in Absentia." Since it is true 
"we are a very courteous and conscien- 
tious group" it would follow that we don't 
need a full time babysitter. The weeks in 
question were not a total disaster and, in 
fact, there were no problems at all. All 
our memos, bulletin board information 
and our Student Government minutes 
were kept up-to-date and distributed to 
us. 

We feel the Resident Assistants of 
Barness second have briefed us suffi- 
ciently on what we should do in case of 
an emergency, and we are aware of our 
responsibilities in case they are not avail- 
able. We also feel that we are mature 
and civilized enough to handle any dis- 
turbances that might occur during the 
Resident Assistants' absences and if we 
are unable to take care of the situation, 
then there is our community coordinator 
and our other R.A.s for the dorm. 

Although our R.A.s are in charge of 
the dorms, they are here for an educa- 
tion FIRST!! They have a responsibility to 
themselves to fulfill their education and 
the Judging Team is a part of that educa- 
tion. 

We, as residents of Barness second, 
feel the person writing this article had no 
right whatsoever. Our R.A.s do their jobs 
and they do them very well! 

Sincerely. 

Tracy Ebert Lisa Dougherty 

Helen Saylor Ivy Diefenbach 

April DeGeorge Linda Gallagher 

Kathy Rothenberger Maryann Vogt 

Allison Angle Becky Smith 

Christy Rudesill Chris Bayer 

Trina Sweigart Stephanie Hughes 

MB Polek Leslie A Mueller 

Susan L Ullrich Victoria J Pierce 

Deborah L. Pomroy Julie Myers 

Joanna Toenniessen Debbie Oesterling 

Anita Scamack Patty Rupell 

Lisa Desher Leslie Ward 

Morgan Kelly A. Modla 
Donna Forte 



Dear Editors, 

This is in response to "R.A.s in Absen- 
tia" (Oct. 10 issue of Ram Pages). We 
are the R.A.s and their roommates from 
Barness Hall. We were appalled to read 
this letter to the editors. We feel that the 
writer(s) should have brought the subject 
to our attention before writing the news- 
paper; they could have resolved the issue 
by talking to their R.A.s, but since they 
wish to make a public issue of it. here is 
our response. 

During the 1984-85 school year, the 
R.A.s in Barness Hall were not present 
due to their involvement in the DVC 
Livestock Judging Team. This, then, left 
the dorm with no R.A. supervision. A 
sophomore was asked to post all memos 
and was given access to the R.A.'s phone 
in case of emergency. Needless to say, 
there were no problems; I should know 
— I was that sophomore. 

We are not hired to be full time baby- 
sitters. We are here for an education, in- 



Answer to last week's puzzle. 



I.C.C. Scholarship 

Applications are now available from 
any I.C.C. representative or the Alumni 
Affairs Office for the I.C.C. scholarship. 
Two awards of $200 will be given to the 
two top choices Monies will be applied 
to the spring semester bill. Due date for 
applications is November 1 . Please return 
to the Alumni Affairs Office: Mrs. Dolby 



eluding extracurricular activities. Live- 
stock Judging Team is a one-credit course 
which enhances our Animal Husbandry 
curriculum. We on the team are learning 
and seeing more that we've ever seen in 
the large animal industry 

The "floor" was informed of their R.A.s 
involvement in the Team at our first 
"floor" meeting. Everyone there was told 
that in our absence, the R.A. downstairs 
would be in charge of the entire floor. All 
emergencies were also covered at that 
meeting; all three R.A.s know what to 
do, each having been trained at our sum- 
mer training session. 

Both Mrs. Somerville and Mr. Lom- 
bardi (Ed. note: Somerville and Lombar- 
di are in charge of Residence Life) knew 
that both upstairs R.A.s were part of the 
Judging Team and what our schedules 
were. Mr. Lombardi and Mrs. Somerville 
agreed that one R.A. could handle the 
dorm with no problems. 

We have not been away on excursions 
that "last weeks at a time." We have 
been absent a total of six full days. Week- 
ends were originally covered by one 
R.A. and were scheduled on our week- 
end duty roster accordingly. If you wish 
to see this schedule, just ask any of the 
three R.A l or Residence Life for a copy. 

Of tht- days we have been gone, we 
have returned without receiving one 
complain' or comment on our absence. 
If the writer (s) had a problem, they never 
approached any one of us; we cannot 
read minds. There have been neither 
problems with disturbances, enforce- 
ment of college policies, nor accidents or 
emergencies, according to people on 
Barness second floor Our job is to keep 
peace and communication lines open if a 
resident of our floor has a problem. 

The "floor" has been equipped with 
first aid kits, a key to the R.A.'s room for 
use of their extension, a maintenance 
key. a fire ladder and necessary instruc- 
tions in case of emergencies. All memos. 
Student Government minutes and other 
information has been kept up-to-date 
too. 

Our roommates knew what rooming 
with an R.A. is all about, whether or not 
we are there. They both knew of our 
absence during Judging season. As one 
of the roommates not on the Team, I 
was shocked when I read the letter to the 
editors, thinking that the "floor" has been 
very close and open. As an R.A. on 
Barness first. I am quite confident in 
handling both floors. I agree that the sec 
ond floor is "a very courteous and con- 
scientious group of girls." I find that being 
in charge of both floors is not an extra 
burden as opposed to working the first 
floor alone. 

As the signatures below suggest, the 
Resident Assistants. Community Coordi- 
nator and R.A.'s roommates feel that this 
subject could have been handled outside 
the newspaper. We encourage you to 
talk to us. We believe that the dorm has 
been handled properly. Residents of 
Barness seem quite content. Therefore, 
we feel that we are doing our jobs, and 
quite well at that. 

Sincerely, 

Brenda Bower R A. first floor 

Beth Meny R A . second floor 

Leslie Mueller R.A roommate 

Lisa Roerig R A . second floor 

Kathy Rothenburger R A roommate 

Mildred Waddington Community Coordinator 

Editors Note 

Ram Pages appreciates the response 
and enthusiasm received in recent letters 
to the editors. However, we must request 
that future letters follow some sort of 
economy of style; that is, opinions you 
wish to have printed must be brief enough 
to benefit from the full impact of their 
content. Don't let your point find itself 
lost in a lengthy letter! 





Rl 




• * * + 



ir if it 



• * • 



• • • 



MM 



EAGLES TICKETS 

Tickets for the Philadelphia Eagles — 
NY. Giants game, November 9 are on 
sale now. in the Dean of Students Office 
The price is $14. This includes transpor- 
tation by bus. to and from Vet. Stadium. 
Sponsored by the Student Government. 

E.M.O. Breaks into Top Ten 
in USA Today's Top 25 

1 . Miami (FL) 7-0 

2 Alabama 7-0 

3. Nebraska 6-0 

4. Michigan 6-0 

5. Oklahoma . 5-1 

6 Penn State . . 6-0 

7. Auburn 6-0 

8 Arizona State 5-0-1 

9. Washington . . . 5-1 

10. E.M.O 4-0 

11. Texas A&M 5-1 

12. L.S.U 4-1 

13. Arizona 5-1 

14 Mississippi State 6-1 

15. Arkansas 5-1 

16 Clemson . . . 5-1 

17 UCLA .4-2 

18. Stanford 5-1 

19. Southern Methodist 5-1 

20. Ohio State 5-2 

21. Southern California . . . 4-2 

22 Georgia 4-2 

23 Baylor ....... 4-3 

24. North Carolina State 4-1-1 

25. North Carolina 4-1-1 

RED SOX vs. METS 

World Series Pool Update 

Ram Pages' World Series Pool attracted 
two very enthusiastic, baseball -minded 
contestants and I'm glad to say both 
made it to the final round. Move over 
Vin and Joe, here's Dan and Donna. 

"Downtown" Daniel Johnston was 
correct when he chose the Mets and 
Boston to make it to the Series and Dan 
chose the Mets to win it all. And then 
there was Donna "The Hammer" Hayek 
who correctly chose New York and Bos 
ton and she chose the Red Sox to win all 
the marbles. 

The Series is leaning in Donna's favor 
and the Series could be over before this 
memorandum reaches the paper. But 
don't give up "Downtown" Dan, think of 
the '85 Royals who came back from 2-0 
to stun St. Louis. 

In either case, the winner will receive 
three coupons for a free Aggie burger, 
fries and Pepsi. 




AGGIES TO RAMS: 

IS IT TIME 
FOR A CHANGE? 




The petition to possibly change the 
DVC mascot from Aggies to Rams will 
resume its circulation this week. Approx- 
imately 250-280 (a majority) more signa- 
tures are needed to complete the task. If 
you would be interested in signing it, 
please move your feet over to Wolfsohn 
25 and give me your signature. 

Athlete of the Week: 

This week's athlete is not well known. 
He's as ordinary as any of us, to a point. 
By day he goes to class as we all do and 
goes to work as a mild mannered "white 
glove" automotive technologist on the 
side. But by night Brian Wood, an Ani- 
mal Husbandry major from Saul High 
School in Philadelphia, becomes a person 
transformed. As a highly trained Ninja 
warrior and kung-fu specialist. Brian pro- 
tects the wicked streets of the big city, 
keeping them safe for women and chil- 
dren. Brian performs execises which re- 
quire remarkable strength and ability. 
Brian is capable of two fingered pushups, 
owns a black belt in karate and has been 
known to astound with his gymnastic lev- 
itation feats Because of his dedication, 
strength, skill, and crime fighting ability. 
Brian Wood is worthy of athlete of the 
week. 



BAKEY, WIDENER 
ROMP TO 17-0 VICTORY 

by John Litzke 

The King of Rock 'n Roll, the ageless 
Chuck Berry, celebrated his birthday last 
Saturday with a mighty "goodness gra- 
cious great balls of fire" and a fabulous 
birthday party that included Eric Clap- 
ton, Mick Jagger, Paul McCartney and 
so on. 

Last Saturday wasn't as jubilant as had 
been expected for the DVC football 
squad and unlike the King's birthday 
celebration. DVC had little to celebrate. 

Widener's junior quarterback Joe 
Bakey ran for touchdowns of four and 
20 yards and a field goal by senior Bob 
Freece from 23 yards out paced the visit- 
ing Pioneers to a 17-0 shutout victory 
over the Aggies. 

The DVC defense played outstanding 
while the offense sputtered once again. 
The offense had the opportunities to 
score but it just couldn't capitalize 

The matchup between fellow MAC ri- 
vals was scoreless through two quarters 
with the respective defenses controlling 
the tempo. Then very late in the second 
quarter, Widener drove down to the 
DVC 13 and with no timeouts and the 
clock running with under 10 seconds left, 
Widener got their field goal team on the 



^ia^-Up 



Sports Quiz 

QUESTION #7: 

Since the World Series is upon us 
now, and the baseball season is coming 
to a close, let's test your World Series 
knowledge In J 973 and 1974 the 
Oakland A's won back to back World 
Series Championships. Can you 
name the starting lineup (by posi- 
tion) and a starting pitcher from 
either the '73 or '74 A's? (The lineup 
was Just about the same for both 
years.) 

If you think you have the right answer, 
jot it down on a piece of paper with your 
name and box * and put it in box 951. If 
your answer is chosen and it is correct, 
you will receive a marvelous prize, a 
respite from dining hall food and a free 
meal from Caesar's Pub. 

No one got the question from week 
#5. Who did the '69 Mets beat to win the 
National League Pennant and who did 
they beat to win the World Series? An- 
swer: The '69 amazing Mets defeated the 
Atlanta Braves in the LCS and the Balti- 
more Orioles in the World Series. 



DVC HOCKEY DROPS 
THRILLER TO SCRANTON 

by Brian Taggart 

Against Scranton on Wednesday, 
DVC started out tough, showing a good 
defense from the beginning. After 23 
minutes, Scranton broke the ice with the 
first score. With five minutes left in the 
first half. Dee Pisauro scored with a great 
assist from Tracy Marshall to tie the 
game. Nine minutes into the second half 
Jackie Heflich scored an unassisted goal 
to put DVC on top 2-1. With three-and- 
a-half minutes left, Scranton scored 
again to tie it up 2-2. In overtime, Scran- 
ton won the game, after six minutes 3-2. 




SOCCER UPDATE: 
Aggies Face Kings, Upsala 

The DVC Aggie*, faced two tough 
MAC teams and tell to defeat in both. 
On Wednesday they faced Upsala and 
played a rough two halves and came up 
short losing 2-0. On Saturday they faced 
Kings and also lost 2-0. Good defensive 
play was put in by Steve Lighty, Dan 
Rothenheber and leading the offensive 
attack was Phil Racobaldo, Alex Simp- 
son and Chris Freudig. Junior Ray Schil- 
ling was the keeper for both matchups. 

This week the Aggies face Scranton 
on Wednesday at home and Lycoming 
on Saturday away. 



field and senior kicker Bob Freece hit the 
23-yarder for the 3-0 lead. As soon as 
Freece kicked the ball the clock went to 
all zeros so he was very lucky to get the 
ball away in time. DVC head coach Al 
Wilson, furious over the play, stormed 
out on the field to plead his case that the 
clock had run out before the ball was 
kicked and that Widener was not set 
before the kick. The referees nullified his 
plea and the half ended 3-0. 

The second half belonged to Widener 
quarterback Joe Bakey who finished 
with 169 total yards (99 passing and 70 
rushing). Seven minutes into the half 
Widener completed a series of six plays 
and went 58 yards capped by a Bakey 
four- yard touchdown burst to increase 
Widener's lead to 10-0. The touchdown 
ended the DVC defense's domination 
over opposing offenses as their scoreless 
string of 13 quarters without allowing a 
touchdown came to a hah. Three cheers 
for the "D"! Then with 8:20 left in the 
third quarter, quarterback Bakey rambled 
in again from 20 yards out and the extra 
point made it 17-0. The 20-yard TD run 
was set up by, guess who, Bakey, who 
on the previous play scampered 47 yards 
on a keeper. 

Widener led in just about every statisti- 
cal category. First downs were Widener 
16 to 1 1 for DVC, passing yardage had 
Widener with 99 yards and DVC with 28 



and rushing yardage had Widener with 
194 and DVC with 98 with a bulk of the 
rushing yardage coming from junior tail- 
back Jimmy Wilson who compiled 70 
yards on 23 carries. 

Always improving defensive tackle 
Steve D'Ambra recorded the only sack of 
the day for DVC while Widener was 
flushing out DVC quarterbacks on a 
bunch of occasions. The injury report for 
DVC was quite extensive for among the 
many injured were wide receiver Bob 
Kennedy, cornerback Mike Heisy, de- 
fensive tackle Ron Shaffer and lineman 
Dave Zabrowski. 

Coach Wilson had these comments 
post game: "The word is execution. If 
you can't execute, that's what happens. 
We could've scored three touchdowns in 
the first quarter — they should've been 
ours — and the longer that goes on — 
stopping ourselves — the more they 
begin to wonder." 

Tomorrow will be maybe the toughest 
challenge for the Aggies this season as 
they will take on the MAC leading In- 
dians from Juniata at Juniata. Juniata 
will take a record of 4-0 MAC and 6-0 
overall into tomorrow's game while DVC 
takes in their 2-2-1 MAC and 2-3-1 
overall. Juniata's high-powered team is 
led by quarterback Mike Culver, receivers 
Jim Metz and Mike Cottle and tailback 
Rick Bouch. It will be a tough battle. 




$p°Rt 

LITZKES 
SPORTS' BRIEFS 

by John Litzke 

• As Olympic commercials begin spring- 
ing up on TV already, the International 
Olympic Committee has selected the 
sights for the 1992 games. The 1992 
summer games will be held in Barce- 
lona, Spain and the 1992 winter games 
will be held across the Spanish border 
in Albertville, France in the French 
Alps. 

• Boston wins game one of the World 
Series 1-0 on an error by Met second 
baseman Tim Teufel. Boston takes 
game two and sweeps the Mets in New 
York. Clemens and Boggs paced the 
18-hit barrage in Boston's 9-3 game 
two victory. The series headed to Bos- 
ton with the Mets winning games three 
and four. The series is tied 2-2 heading 
into the fifth game on Thursday night. 

• In high school football action last week 
it was: 

Central 14, Frankford 7 
Lincoln 10, M.L. King 
Germantown 21, Edison 12 
Bartram 34, S. Philadelphia 14 
Washington 27, Mastbaum 
Roxborough 34, Gratz 6 
Ben Franklin 18, W. Philadelphia 
University City 0, BOK 
Episcopal 14, Germantown Acad. 6 
Arch. Ryan 14, Bishop Kenrick 7 
Quakertown 35, Methacton 25 
Upper Dublin 35, Hatboro-Horsham 7 
Norristown 27, Pennridge 7 
North Penn 7, C.B. East 
C.B. West 14, Abington 
William Tennent 21. Harry Truman 7 
Council Rock 13, Neshaminy 10 
P-Whitemarsh 35, Cheltenham 6 
U. Moreland 27. L. Moreland 7 
Springfield 21, Wissahickon 6 
Card. Dougherty 28, Arch. Wood 14 
Arch. Carroll 16, Msgr. Bonner 

• Former all-pro tight end with the 
Washington Redskins, Jerry Smith, 
dies at the age of 45 from AIDS. Jerry 
was a 13-year starter with the Redskins. 

• In major college football last weekend it 
was: 

Miami, FL 45, Cincinnati 13 
Alabama 56, Tennessee 28 
Florida St. 59. Wichita St. 3 
Nebraska 48, Missouri 17 
Notre Dame 31, Air Force 3 
Oklahoma 19, Oklahoma St. 
Clemson 35, Duke 3 
SMU 10. Houston 3 
Penn St. 42, Syracuse 3 
Michigan 20. Iowa 17 
Washington 48, Bowling Green 
Texas A&M 31. Baylor 30 
Central St.. Ohio 63, Kentucky St. 7 
Ferris St. 55, Michigan Tech. 41 



STAFF 

Editors- in-Chief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Artist Monica Etzweiler 

Reporters Mike Bolles. Missy 

Brangan, Brett Hart, Judy Henry. John 

Nicholson. Melanie O'Neill. Brian 

Taggart. Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry, Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 

Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news in the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 



Minot St. 55, Mayville St. 
Temple 29, Virginia Tech. 13 

• In college football games of interest it 
was: 

Ursinus 17, Gettysburg 15 

Florida 15, Rutgers 3 

Slippery Rock 49, Shippensburg 6 

Kutztown 42, Cheyney 12 

Albright 26, Lebanon Valley 10 

Penn 30, Navy 26 

W. Chester 20, E. Stroudsburg . ' 

Villanova 20, Catholic 7 

Susquehanna 17, Moravian 

Lycoming 42, Upsala 

Juniata 38, Wilkes 31 

• Get this! Multi-Olympic gold medalist 
Carl Lewis launches his singing career. 
Can you believe it! 

• Flyers rolling along nicely at 4-0 but 
how about those first place, 6-0 Pitts- 
burgh Penguins? It's true. 

• In NFL football action in week 7 of the 
season it was: 

Dallas 17, Philadelphia 14 
Kansas City 42, San Diego 41 
Minnesota 23, Chicago 7 
LA Raiders 30, Miami 28 
Cincinnati 31, Houston 28 
Green Bay 17, Cleveland 14 
Buffalo 24, Indianapolis 13 
New England 34, Pittsburgh 
Atlanta 10, San Francisco 10 
New Orleans 38, Tampa Bay 7 
Washington 28, St. Louis 21 
LA Rams 14, Detroit 10 
Seattle 17. NY Giants 12 

• Monday night it was: 
NY Jets 22, Denver 10 

• This Sunday it will be: 
San Diego at Philadelphia 
Cleveland at Minnesota 
Detroit at Chicago 

LA Raiders at Houston 
Miami at Indianapolis 
New England at Buffalo 
New Orleans at NY Jets 
San Francisco at Green Bay 
Tampa Bay at Kansas City 
Atlanta at LA Rams 
St. Louis at Dallas 
Seattle at Denver 
Monday night it will be: 
Washington at NY Giants 

• In WWF wrestling action at the Spec- 
trum: Hulk Hogan defeated "Mr. 
Wonderful" Paul Orndorff. Randy 
"Macho Man" Savage defeated the 
Honky Tonk Man. Hillbilly Jim defeat- 
ed Mr. Fuji. Kamala the Ugandan 
Headhunter defeated Leaping Lenny 
Poffo. Corporal Kirshner defeated 
Tiger Chung Lee. 

• Flyers equal best start ever tying their 
'83'84 record start of 5-0 after 3-1 vic- 
tory over Winnipeg. Flyers goalies Ron 
Hextall and Bob Froese have allowed 
just eight goals in five games and have 
best goals against average in the league 
at 1.60. Washington is currently last 
and both New York teams are fifth and 
fourth. 

• High scoring NY Knick Bernard King 
suffered yet another setback when he 
stepped in a pothole while jogging, 
twisted his right ankle and right knee 
and will be out of action from 3-6 
weeks 



New Flower Shop Hours 

Monday 

12:30-6 p.m. 

Tuesday 

1:30-2:45 p.m. • 4-6 p.m. 

Wednesday 

8:30-11 a.m. • 4-6 p.m. 

Thursday 

9-11 a.m. 

Friday 

8:30a.m.-l p.m. • 2:30-6 p.m. 

Sometimes words simply aren't 
enough, hut flowers say it all. 




WOMEN'S CROSS 
COUNTRY UPDATE 

The Cross Country team traveled to 
Allentown College on Saturday for the 
5th Annual Allentown College Invita- 
tional Cross Country Meet. 

The weather was beautiful and condi- 
tions were good for the meet. The race 
started at 11 a.m. with 13 teams repre- 
sented. Six teams including DVC women 
ran as non-counters since all team mem- 
bers could not make it. 

Monica Etzweiler came in 30th place 
with a time of 22:42, Trish Moorzitz 
came in 34th place with a time of 23:33, 
Deanna Smith came in 56th place with a 
time of 27:17 and Kathy Lunova came 
in 62nd place with a time of 28:42. 

The final scores were Lehigh with 26, 
Ursinus with 40, Moravian with 62, 
Allentown with 116, Baptist Bible with 
163. LIU. /Southampton with 164 and 
Cabrini with 167. The non-counter 
teams included DVC. Cedar Crest, 
Montgomery CCC, Salisbury State, 
Univ. of Scranton and Swarthmore. 




Boyle's Arm and Smith's Legs 
Lead E.M.O. to Victory 

Chris "Heisman Hopeful" Boyle threw 
fro five touchdowns and Steve Smith 
caught two long touchdowns leading 
E.M.O. to a 33-0 victory over the Ulman 
Brothers. Also scoring was Sean McGrath. 
Mike Zendt and Vinne Pastore The de- 
fense was lead by Cy Rother and Bill 
Boyle with one interception a piece. The 
E.M.O. sack exchange was lead by Wayne 
Lutz and Jim Bauzon. E.M.O. finished 
the regular season undefeated with a 4-0 
record. Hopefully, if E.M.O. can win the 
playoffs they will get a bowl bid Maybe 
even the Orange Bowl against Miami. 
Florida for the National Championship. 




Models Needed 

Local photographer looking for stu- 
dents wishing to pose for stock photos of 
college related scenes and situations. 

Good looking, serious minded stu- 
dents only. Payment is either in portfolio 
prints or hourly. Please contact the studio 
for an appointment at 340-0900. 



MENS CROSS 
COUNTRY UPDATE 

It was a perfect fall day for the Harriers 
as they traveled up to Allentown College 
last Saturday to participate in the Allen- 
town Invitational. Unexpectedly, the 
team got a taste of the competition they 
would face in their MAC championship 
meet, which is held in November, be- 
cause seven out of the 12 teams which 
participated were MAC schools. 

Even though the team finished 10th, 
most of the runners turned in a good 
performance. 

Garry Kampmeyer. Tony Donofrio 
and Tom Await ran especially well turn- 
ing in one of their better times this season 
for a 5 25 mile course. Dave Sports, 
DVC's first man, also had an outstanding 
day finishing eignth overall. Other per- 
formances included: Jim Enoch finishing 
56th. injured John Thompson finishing 
78th. Sean Miller finishing 85th and 
freshman Mark Brinsky finishing 96th 
overall. 

The team has one more dual meet 
against Albright on Saturday before they 
start preparing for the MAC champion- 
ship meet which is held two weeks later 
at Gettysburg, ''"he team needs a victory 
on Saturday to bring their record up to 
500 



HEISMAN WATCH 

Chris Boyle, E.M.O. (4-0) 

Quarterback, senior 

Thursday: Alman Brothers 

Last week: 30 art.. 20 comp.. 400 

yds.. 5 TDs; 1986: 95 art.. 69 

comp.. 1.200 yds.. 16 TDs. 3 int.. 5 

TD rushing 




HELP WANTED! 

$60 per hundred paid 
for remailing letters from home! 

Send self-addressed, 

stamped envelope for 

information/application to> 

ASSOCIATES 

Box 95 B. Roselle. NJ 07203 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: Cooler Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

/Area's Best Lunches 11 AM -3 PM 

Hoppy Hour 4-6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 





nMfflraOTQmg Wlflfflsr (MO®®® 



Vol. XXI, No. 9 

Friday, October 31. 1986 




NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



BOO! 



Dining Hall Decorum 

Dear Editors, 

The following is an article written in 
cooperation with a group of concerned 
students on campus. 

Are you tired of entering the dining 
hall with your tray and being unable to 
find a clean spot at which you can eat? 
You can look around and see empty 
tables, but each table seems buried be- 
neath a disgusting array of trays, glass- 
ware, food and garbage piled up in the 
center. If you had an appetite when you 
sat down, seeing this disgusting mess is 
enough to kill anyone's appetite. 

Dining hall cleanliness and behavior 
this year is deplorable. There are stu- 
dents in the dining hall who seem to 
pride themselves on making the biggest 
messes. Even when you do find a clean 
spot to sit down, there is often some wise 
guy at the next table throwing food 
across the dining hall at his buddies. As 
you eat, this thrown food falls to the floor 
around you. 

The people who throw food and refuse 
to clean up after themselves better wake 
up. A concerned group of students is 
organizing on campus in an attempt to 
resolve this problem in the dining hall. 
These students pay to eat in the cafeteria 
just like everyone else, and it is their right 
to have a clean place to sit and eat. 
Everyone is watching in the dining hall 
and is noting the offending people. Some 
offenders have already been turned in to 
the Residence Life Office and the Dining 
Service. 

Anyone turned in for either offense 
will be quickly called in to meet with the 
Directors of Residence Life and/or the 
Dean of Students. There will be no warn- 
ing for the first offense. The first time will 
immediately cost you a $25.00 fine (bet 
you didn't know that, did you?). Dining 
hall regulations are printed on page 49 of 
the Student Handbook, and they're pret- 
ty clearly written. If you're turned in a 
second time, the fine will be levied again, 
and can also result in a temporary or per- 
manent suspension of your dining privi- 
leges. If your dining privileges are revoked 
for any reason, you do not get a refund. 
You lose the money you already paid, 
plus you incur additional expense for 
finding another place to eat. 

Everyone should be aware of these 
rules. People are watching in the dining 
hall. The next time you see someone 
leave a mess at a table or throw food, 
don't just sit there, do something. Notify 
any member of Student Government, 
the Food Committee or your R.A. Peo- 
ple should not have to put up with these 
disgusting habits. 

Like the little notices on the table say, 
"Your mother doesn't work here, bus 
your own tray." Think about it; if your 
mom did work here and she saw you 
acting like that, she'd probably smack 
you alongside the head and refuse to 
feed you for awhile. 

Name withheld upon request 



Aggies vs. Rams 

Dear Editors, 

This letter is directed to those behind 
the petition to change our "Aggies" mas- 
cot to the "Rams." It's bad enough you 
want to break tradition, but, it's the rea- 
soning behind your efforts that really in- 
furiates me. 

While going door to door to get signa- 
tures, the petitioner told one student we 
should change the name because "We 
are changing the president and football 
coach." I'm sorry, but I fail to see the re- 
lationship. Since when do we have to 
follow the actions of the football team? 
Administration and staff are allowed to 
retire — it is part of business. But so is 
tradition. Like this same petitioner told 
me, "We've had this name for 100 
years" — all the more reason to keep it. 

Look at some of the schools that have 
kept their mascot names because of tra- 
dition — Indiana Hoosiers, Texas Ag- 
gies, Purdue Boiler Makers. Today, 
Texas A&M has a smaller percentage of 
students majoring in agriculture than 
DVC does, but they haven't changed 
their name. Besides that, how many 
boiler makers do you see on Purdue's 
campus? Not many. But they haven't 
changed their name. They are proud to 
be a part of their school's tradition . 

When I approached the petitioner and 
asked him why he wanted to change the 
name he said, "It's time for a change . . . 
the school is moving more towards busi- 
ness . . . our sports teams should be called 
Rams, not Aggies." 

I'm sick of students trying to change 
this school to suit the business majors 
and athletes. I have nothing against the 
business majors. Nor do I have anything 
against athletes (I played varsity basket- 
ball here for two years and have ridden 
on the Equestrian team for four years). 
But, business and athletics are not the 
school's *1 and # 2 priorities. We are 
here to get an education — that means 
in business and science and agriculture 
(notice the name of the college) . 

True, the business program is growing 
at DVC, but it has not replaced science 
and agriculture (69% of DVC students 
are enrolled in either science or agricul- 
ture) . Our ag programs are growing also. 
Within the Animal Husbandry Depart- 
ment, the Lab Animal Science and Equine 
specializations are attracting more and 
more students. Did you know that our 
Equestrian team won the Regional 
Championship last year? We defeated 
Division I schools, represented our region 
at the National Horse Show and even 
had one student win a National title. And 
yes, believe it or not, we are one team 
that is proud to be the Aggies! 

If it bothers you so much to be an Ag- 
gie, why did you enroll here? We need 
students who are happy to be at DVC 
and who want to represent this school 
because of everything it has to offer, not 
just because it enables them to play a 
sport. I'm not accusing all the athletes, I 
know there are some who enjoy being at 
DVC. But so many times I'll hear others 
complaining that they hate this, and this, 
and this about DVC. One has to wonder 



— if it weren't for the sport, would they 
still be here? 

If you can't be happy both playing for 
DVC and being at DVC, then obviously 
this isn't the school for you. This school 
needs student camaraderie and spirit. It 
does not need the negative attitude that 
you are spreading around. 

If you really want to help change the 
school for the better, why don't you re- 
direct your efforts to some of the more 
important issues such as SADD, campus 
cleanup or social activities. 

But, if it shames you that much to be 
coming to a school that calls itself the Ag- 
gies, then LEAVE! The rest of us will be 
proud to graduate from DVC and will be 
proud to have been an Aggie. 

Sincerely, 

JoAnna Toenniessen 




AHA Expecting 
200 Turkeywalkers 

Registrations are coming in for the 
American Heart Association's pre- 
Thanksgiving special event, the TUR- 
KEYWALK. AHA expects about 200 
area residents to participate in the TUR- 
KEYWALK which is scheduled for Sat- 
urday, November 8th. 

Building on the success of last year's 
premiere of the TURKEYWALK in 
Southeastern Pennsylvania, this year the 
event will be held simultaneously in two 
locations: Ridley Creek State Park in 
Media and Tyler State Park in Newtown 
from 12-3:30 p.m. 

The event is expected to attract walkers 
of all ages from throughout the five- 
county area. The Heart Association rec- 
ommends walking as an ideal exercise 
for conditioning the cardiovascular sys- 
tem. This time of year is a perfect oppor- 
tunity for the whole family to get out and 
enjoy the scenery. 

Participants in the TURKEYWALK 
collect pledges from family, friends and 
neighbors for each mile they walk. The 
funds raised by these participants sup- 
port vital AHA medical research and 
education programs. Participants also re- 
ceive prizes based on the amount of 
pledges they collect. The list of prizes in- 
cludes: a TURKEYWALK visor, TUR- 
KEYWALK t-shirt, an AHA warm-up 
suit and, as you might guess from the 
name of the event, a turkey just in time 
for the holidays. 

The TURKEYWALK trails are 4.5 
miles long at Ridley Creek State Park 
and 6.2 miles long at Tyler State Park. 

Blue Cross of Greater Pennsylvania 
and Pennsylvania Blue Shield are once 
again the sponsors. 

For more information, or to register, 
call your local Heart Association office at 
215/ 757-0719. 



DVC DAIRY 

The DVC Dairy is proud to announce 
a tremendous increase in the milk pro- 
duction averages of our herd. In August 
of 1985 our Holstein herd average was 
18,980 pounds of milk per cow per year. 
This past month the Holsteins averaged 
20,883 pounds of milk, and we are 
quickly approaching the 21,000 pound 
mark. This achievement will place us 
among the top production percentages 
of dairy herds in Pa. and in the country. 
Our Brown Swiss and Ayrshire herd av- 
erages have also increased 755 pounds 
and 824 pounds of milk respectively. 

In total, this will constitute over 
$6,000.00 per year increased income 
from milk production alone. Along with 
higher yields will come herd recognition 
and increased marketing potential of our 
breeding stock. 

Many people are to be congratulated 
for the herd's success In July of 1985 a 
new feed management program was im- 
plemented under the guidance of Larry 
Morris. The introduction of a total mixed 
ration program supplemented with min- 
erals has proven to be very effective. 

Management is also a key element of 
productivity. Paul Knight began manag- 
ing the dairy as our superintendent in 
June of this year. Since then the herd 
health procedures and daily manage- 
ment practices have been refined and 
keenly maintained. 

. Thank you and congratulations to the 
dairy staff, students, faculty and Ag 
Team for this successful achievement. 
Keep up the good work!! 




is Week on 
Campus 



■* 






by Missy Brangan 

FRIDAY. OCTOBER 31 

Ooh, scary . . it's Trick or Treat to- 
night on aB-Haflow's Eve! Send a chill 
up your spine with a haunting Mad- 
rid*, sponsored by the Gass of '87. 
(The itinerary may include a slop at 
Sleepy HoBow.) 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1 

HUM Club Hayride. Meet at 7:30 

p.m. at the FeHstein Court. Afterward; 

there will be refreshments behind the 

Admissions Bldg. 

Football (A) vs. Lebanon VaSey, 1:30 

p.m. 

Dance Band "Rttz," 9 p.m.- 12 

midnight, APR 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2 

R&RdayR 

Equestrian Team (A) vs. Beaver, 8 
a.m. 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3 

52 days untf Christmas*'! 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 4 

Election day 1 Get out and votei 
Soccer (H) vs. Washington. 3 p.m 

WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 5 

NO CLASSES"! Final preregistranon 
Movie. Bock to the Future, 9 p.m . 
APR 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6 

Soccer (H) vs. Moravian, 3 p.m. 
Come out and support DVC's teams? 






* 



CLUB NEWS 

Dairy Society Cheese Sale 

The Dairy Society would like to an- 
nounce that our fall cheese and sausage 
sale is underway. Prices range from five 
to twelve dollars. Thanksgiving orders 
are due by November 7 and will be dis- 
tributed before Thanksgiving break. A 
Christmas order is due by December 2 
and will be distributed by Christmas 
break. Money will be collected on deliv- 
ery. Anyone interested, contact: Scott 
Cooper at Work 220, ext. 2395; Becky 
Rice at Berk 231; or Dr. Plummer at Ag. 
106, ext. 2308. 

Remember: cheese and sausage can 
make great holiday gifts! Thank you for 
your support. 

Gleaner in Trouble 

by M. Brangan 

The Gleaner is DVC's art and literary 
magazine which is published every year 
by the students at DVC. But, this year, 
The Gleaner is in serious trouble. It 
seems student reaction to this publication 
is non-existent. This year we had a total 
of two students come to meetings and 
get involved. 

The students complain about the lack 
of activities at DVC. Well, nobody will 
get involved. The Gleaner offers 0.5 
credit free per semester. What other club 
(other than Ram Pages) can do that? 
What we need are members to help with 
layout and people to contribute any orig- 
inal work by February 1st to Box 987. 
The original work can be poems, photo- 
graphs, drawings and short stories. 

The Gleaner is a book which is not 
only distributed free of charge to students 
but also to faculty and alumni. This is a 
way to leave your mark on DVC. If you 
are interested please contact Box 987 
and remember the deadline to submit is 
February 1, 1987. 

Drama Club Presents 
Children's Show 

Who are the DVC Players? The DVC 
Players is the name of the college Drama 
Club. We are proud to announce that 
this fall we will be performing a children's 
show. Jack and the Beanstalk will have 
three performances. It starts Friday, 
December 5, with a night performance. 
There will be a Saturday matinee on 
December 6, followed by a night time 
performance that same day. Several 
talented students have filled our cast, but 
we will still need technical people. If you 
have any questions please contact Box 
207. 

Gardening in the Shade 

by Jerry L. Fritz 

This Monday, November 3 at 7 p.m. 
in the coffeehouse, Mr. David Benner 
will be giving a lecture/slide show on 
"Gardening in the Shade." 

Mr. Benner has been involved with 
DVC in the Ornamental Horticulture De- 
partment for nearly 20 years. Mr. Ben- 
ner's personal garden has been a topic of 
many horticulture publications. He is a 
well known plantsman and is well worth 
listening to. 

Looking forward to seeing you there! 
This event is open to ALL students, staff, 
faculty and the general community. 



About Editorial Policy 

Ram Pages has specific rules and 
guidelines we must follow regarding edi- 
torials received by students, faculty and 
staff to be printed in the newspaper. This 
is for your use. Use it as a guide to writ- 
ing acceptable editorials. 

Ram Pages Editorial Policy 

1. Ram Pages reserves the right to 
make any editorial changes in all 
material submitted for publication. 

2. Only signed material will be con- 
sidered for publication. Signatures 
will be withheld upon request. 

3. Any material which is considered by 
the student editor(s) or faculty advisor 
to be potentially libelous will be inves- 
tigated and documented before con- 
sideration for publication. 

4. The writers of material in question 
must certify sincerity of purpose and 
correctness of facts to the best of their 
knowledge. 

5. The person (s) named or implied in 
the controversial material shall be in- 
formed of any article before publica- 
tion and shall be given the opportuni- 
ty to respond. 

Thank You, 
Co Editors in Chief 
John D. Ebert 
Bill Rein 

STUDENTS CREATE 

WORLD FOOD DAY 

EXHIBIT 

DVC students Emily Cannon, Betsy 
Hague and John Litzke presented an ex- 
hibit, "Pesticides Assure Quality Foods," 
at the Philadelphia Area World Food 
Day Observation. October 16, 1986. 
The event, held at the Reading Terminal 
Market, included educational and service 
agencies involved with communicating 
the need for a sustained food supply for 
all the world's people.' 

High praise was given the students for 
their work which applied information 
from Dr. Cordrey's Principles of Plant 
Protection course. In addition to those 
presenting the exhibit, Brenda Bower, 
Linda Chiappini and Jane Melson assist- 
ed in developing the theme and prepar- 
ing the materials from ideas gleaned 
from class suggestions. Dr. Avery, Agri- 
business chairman, advised and accom- 
panied the students. 

World Food Day participants observed 
exhibits and talked with representatives 
of food programs serving the Delaware 
Valley as well as those with global con- 
cerns. The event was exciting and edu- 
cational for both college students and 
visitors. 



* Money-For-College * 

by Irving Bender 

College is part of the American dream. 
But then there's the nightmare: how 
to pay for it! This column offers some 
answers. 

Q. I am a dance major transferring to 
a college for the performing arts. My fi- 
nancial package, including a scholarship 
from the school, a Pell grant and a Guar- 
anteed Student Loan, is $1,800 short 
against a $6,000 annual school cost. I 
am from a single parent family and have 
been working full time this summer. My 
need is urgent and immediate. (S.H.E., 
MD) 

A. You might be eligible for a Work- 
Study program at your new school. This 
is federally funded, allowing you to work 
at the college part-time to produce need- 
ed funds. 

In the private sector, you are eligible 
for some awards as a woman, for your 
career interest, for any field of study and 
many other factors in your background 
and family history. Many of the dance 
awards are connected to particular schools 
or states. 

Here is an actual award you are eligible 
for: DELTA SIGMA THETA SORORITY 
(Myra Davis Hemmings Scholarships), 
1707 New Hampshire Ave. NW, Wash- 
ington, DC 20009. Award amounts not 
specified. Deadline: March 15. Fields in- 
clude the performing arts. Must be a 
financial member of Delta Sigma Theta. 
Scholarships awarded on meritorious 
achievement. 

What are you eligible for from the pri- 
vate sector? This is an enormous chore 
which can be shortcut by a computer ser- 
vice. You can tap into the largest data- 
base of private source listings in the 
world, topping $8 billion. These listings 
cover UNDERGRADUATE. GRADUATE 
and OVERSEAS study. For free details, 
write: Financial Aid Finders. 77 Gristmill 
Rd, Randolph, N J 07869. 

Fighting Against 
the Cafeteria 

Dear Editors, 

One of the major problems on campus 
is the food service. Several students have 
joined together to start to combat this 
problem. As you may already know, a 
petition has been started and help is still 
needed through signatures. 

Our objective is to bring together the 
student body to bring about positive 
changes in the cafeteria. 

Complaints, suggestions and possible 
solutions should be sent to Box 550 con- 
cerning the cafeteria situation. 

Thank you. 
Concerned Students 



ATTENTION STUDENTS... 

Job Experience to Complement Your Education 

If you are seeking part-time, full-time or live-in employ- 
ment in the human services field, PAI invites you to begin 
your professional career working with people who have a 
mental or physical handicap and need YOU. 



HELP WANTED! 

$60 per hundred paid 
for remailing letters from home! 

Send self-addressed, 

stamped envelope for 

information/application to: 

ASSOCIATES 
Box 95 B. Roselle, NJ 07203 



PAI WANTS: 

• people who are caring and 
enthusiastic 

• people who can use their 
education or life ex- 
perience to build a career 

• people who respect the 
rights of others with 
disabilities 



PAI OFFERS YOU: 

• training and continuing 
education 

• challenging, rewarding 
experience 

• flexible schedule— full- 
time, part-time, live-in 

• professional career ad- 
vancement opportunities 

• a chance to share yourself 
with others 

• excellent fringe benefits 

PAI WANTS YOU... 

If you want professional growth while you share your life 
with those who need you most. 

Gain the valuable experience PAI can give you by calling 
(215) 822-6417 for your application or by sending your 
resume to: 




Prospectus Associates, IncT" 

Twin Park Industrial Center • 3151 Advance Lane 
Colmar, PA 18915 • (215) 822-6417 



DVC Dairy Team Makes 

Top Five Finalists in 

National Contest 

On October 1st, the DVC dairy judg- 
ing team finished near the top in two di- 
visions of the 1986 National Intercolle- 
giate Contest held in Madison, WI. 

The team was second in the Jersey 
breed competition with Tom Saffell as 
second high individual nationally. His 
score was 146 points out of a possible 
150 points. Julie Squier was sixth high 
individual with a 143 point total score. 

In the Guernsey breed, the DVC team 
finished third high in the nation. Brian 
Fleisher was tied for ninth high individual 
with 144 points, while Tom Saffell tied 
for 17th with 143 points and Julie Squier 
tied for 22nd at 142 points. 

Jackie Heflich tied for eighth high in- 
dividual in the Ayrshire breed competi- 
tion. Her total was 145 points, achieving 
a perfect 50-point score on oral reasons. 
Julie Squier was also 18th place in the 
Holstein breed. 

The 33-team competition proved to 
be very competitive and keen with the 
DVC team finishing 25th overall, and 
18th in team reasons. 

At the Pa. All- American Intercollegiate 
Contest in Harrisburg, Brian Fleisher was 
High Individual in the Brown Swiss breed 
with a score of 147 points. The DVC 
team finished 15th in a competition of 20 
teams. 

In Springfield, Ma., the team ended 
up eighth htqh team overall, second 
team in Holsteins and third place in Ayr- 
shires. Tom Saffell was fourth high in- 
dividual in Ayrshires and 12th in Hol- 
steins. while Jackie Heflich was 1 1th in 
both the Holstein and Jersey breeds, and 
12th in Ayrshires. Brian Fleisher was 
ninth place in Holsteins and fourteenth in 
Ayrshires. 

Overall. Jackie Heflich was 14th high 
individual with team members Tom Saf- 
fell. Brian Fleisher and Julie Squier 
finishing 19th, 24th and alternate, 
respectively. 

These students are to be commended 
and admired for their diligent work, ef- 
fort and success with their college judg- 
ing careers. 

Non-Stick Situation 

Dear Editors, 

Did the school try to save money with 
the parking stickers this year or was there 
some other mistake? These stickers will 
not last the school year. I can't believe 
many students including myself paid $15 
to watch a piece of paper shrivel off our 
cars. I think it makes our school look bad 
when you see some of the stickers. 

Also, does security ever write any 
parking tickets for a good reason? If so, 
why don't I ever see a ticket on the 
Monte Carlo that takes up two spaces in 
the parking lot? Why doesn't this person 
park the car at the very end of the lot if 
he is so concerned about it? 

Sincerely, 

A Concerned Commuter 



STAFF 

EditorsinChief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Artist Monica Etzweiler 

Reporters Mike Bolles. Missy 

Brangan, Brett Hart, Judy Henry, John 

Nicholson. Melanie O'Neill. Brian 

Taggart, Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry, Anne Shobert. 

Mr. Edward O'Brien. 

Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news in the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 



Personals 



Mike D. — Let's do It again this Friday! 

Regina — Arc you a clepto or what? 

Regina — Lighten up Francis!! 

Lori O. — A woot, wanna buy a duck? 

Hey Jim — Thanks for the pumpkin! But 
did you have to put it in my bed???? 

Regina — Do you mean to tell me you 
men completed the training on your 
own? That's the fact Jack!! - C.J. 

Karen V. — Gee, this Diet Orange Slice 
has some kick to it. 

Chipmunk — You're such a klutz. You're 
either having car accidents or falling into 
self-made puddles. One of these days I 
won't be able to go to work because I'll 
be at your funeral. Happy fishing. — 
Your roomie 

Notice to the Honey Nut Cheerio Group 
— We're planning a reunion. Keep a 
watch out for more information. — The 
Fruit Loop Troop 

Lynn I. — Let's go get some peanuts. 

Rudy — Have you been to the Red Lob- 
ster lately. I heard everyone else has. Try 
the shrimp trampi. Suppose to be the 
best on the menu. — Lisa & Tracy 

Wilbert — You's your new man? 

Froot Loop Troop — We ARE the 

women. 

Hank — Wanna hang out, or what? — 

CJ&RL 

J & C — Are you smiling? 

Junior Farmer — When are you going to 
fix our chair? 

Chicken— Nice cornfield action Thursday. 

Goodbye Psycho — We'll miss you. 

Jeff P. — Nice friend you have, huh? 

Bob — Enjoying the key chains, clepto!. 

Chris A. — You missed your favorite 
lady on TV. 

Congrats Bee on being a chunka victim 

roommate! 

Kim, Melissa, Bev & Donna — "How 

about those Mets?!" 

Helen — If he's married, has kids and is 

left handed, go for it. — Chip 

Mike D. - Will you do ANYTHING for 

Doritos? 

Goobers!!!! 

Regina & Laurie — What type of train- 
ing? AAARMY Training Sir!! 

K.V., M.D., R.L., S.H., L.M., L.O., 
R.N. — Journey to the great pumpkin 
patch. Hey guys I'm all muddy. 

Laurie & Lori — Get me a gord!! Laurie, 
can you hold the baby one? 

B-I-L-L - Bill 

Hey Rap — Next time I'll go the speed 
limit if you swallow the cans. On second 
thought, there won't be a next time. 

Bev— Where's the expression? Pondering? 

Laurie & Beth — Why did the chicken 
cross the road? To get from the left to the 
right! Sir!! 

Joe P. — I heard that's how you were 
conceived. 

Karen, Michelle & Regina — Don't you 
know 1 heard it through the grapevine! 

Lynn I. — Why can't you go up a hill? 

Ivy - What to do, what to do? A 33- 
year-old slap on one hand and a nice in- 
nocent young boy on the other. Where's 
your happy medium? Maybe when you 
get psychological help you'll find it. — 
Sleezestack & Chipmunk 

Norton — I pick on ya cause I know you 
like it. 

Marvin — Guys suck, don't worry about 
'em, just have fun. 

Helen — Do you want a ticket to Florida? 
You can always go to work at Friendly's. 
You leave the store and there won't be 
any more Thursday visitors. — Sleeze- 
stack & Chipmunk 

Barney — Thanks for leaving me with no 
lab partner! 



Joe P. —I hear your mother is intoxicated? 
Joe P. — Is she next in line? 
Joe P.— Do you feel good about yourself? 
Alfred Dunhill, Ltd. , London — The cost 
does not matter, I have a credit card. 

Val — Watch for those spiral staircases!!! 

S. — Want to meet me in front of the Ag 
Building again sometime soon?!! — D. 

Roomie — Let me know before I have 
another serious accident. Sorry you 
missed work. SK & F must really hate 
me. - V2TTT 

Seymour — I heard all about what you 
did, so did the whole campus. 
Mike D. — Is Brian a good kisser? 
Marc — You owe us two visits!! 
Hey Mario — I'm sorry your namesake 
died, it ruined my day too. 

To The Honey Nut Cheerio Group — 

We're having the reunion at the same 

place we partied last summer (for Alex's 

B-day). The date will be announced. — 

The Fruit Loop Troop 

Carmen — I want you to know, you look 

mighty hot with smashed oreos on your 

forehead. 

Joe P. Is that how your Dad taught you? 

Lynn I. — WHOA ... I'm just making a 

u-turn. 

Roomie — Why are there little guys on 

your underwear? 

If you ask me, I think he found a great 
peach! 

Lynn I. — Who did you interrupt in the 
bushes? What were they doing? 

Jo — Why can't you make any steam? 
Yoda — Keep your roses and your trash 
to yourself. As soon as you get your cel- 
lophane up then you'll have a lot of trash 
to be getting rid of! — Sleezestack & 
Chipmunk 

Stanley — He does like you. 
Joe P. I guess you do this kind of thing a 
lot, nice! 

Mable — Are you trashed again? (Hint 
S.S.) 

Melissa — Fall in any holes lately? 
Sleezestack — I don't have the right bait 
for the fish. It's OK though because I 
hear you have a FISH'er of your own. — 
Chipmunk 

Hank — You better shut up!! 
Tony — You're alright!! Forgive me? 
Regina — Cheer up babe, we love ya!! 
John — I heard your favorite fruit is ap- 
ples. Is it true? 

To my friends — Get your costumes 
ready for Friday night. 

Did anybody do R.B. last night? 
"Racka Shmacka Fracka Racka" 
Holiday Inn, New Hope, 1-800-523-6834 
Mike D. — Did you have to wear your 
sneakers in bed? 
Karen Vincent — Oh my God!! 
Frank — Nice do frankfurter!! 

Scott & Rich — Give me your best pose. 

Hey, where are you putting that hat??!! 

Alright!! 

Jamie — I swear I didn't write it! 

Kirsten — Two mushrooms at one col- 
lege is enough! 

You'll never know who my favorite lady 
is on or off TV. 

Rebecca — Too bad!! 

Val — You can't be classy by buying a 

classy cigarette, you have to be bom with 

it. 

John N. - YOU CANT HANG! 

John N. — Something smells fishy in 
your room. Is it Miss Aquarium 1981 or 
what? 

Val — But we seem to forget credit cards 
have to be paid off in cash. There's no 
substitute for the real thing, besides I 
don't accept credit cards. — Alfred Dun- 
hill Ltd., London 



AGRICULTURAL 
MARKETING ASSOCIATES 

AGRICULTURAL MARKETING AS- 
SOCIATES announced a brisk sale of 
stock to the students, faculty and staff of 
DVC. These shareholders are pooling 
resources to purchase processed agricul- 
tural products which will be merchandised 
at a profit. If the stockholder makes pur- 
chases of the cooperatives products and 
the organization turns a profit then the 
individual receives patronage refunds in 
proportion to purchases. Also, a possibil- 
ity exists for yield on the capital stock al- 
though that is limited to eight percent per 
annum. You can still participate in an ex- 
cellent opportunity as stock is available 
for the entire community to share in this 
venture. You can obtain a prospectus 
from the Agribusiness Department. 

A result of the public offering on Wed- 
nesday, October 15, 1986 were a num- 
ber of questions about the cooperative 
form of business. A cooperative has a 
distinctive structure by being democratic- 
ally controlled with each member owning 
one share of stock and having one vote. 
Another feature exclusive to coopera- 
tives is at the conclusion of the account- 
ing period members receive any income 
in excess of the expenses in proportion 
to the volume of business that they have 
brought to the cooperative. 

Cooperatives make a significant con- 
tribution to the American economy. To- 
day farmers market approximately 29% 
of their products and purchase about 
18% of their supplies through coopera- 
tives. And they are a vital part of our 
economic history. In 1752 the Philadel- 
phia Contributorship for the Insurance of 
Homes from Loss of Fire was formed 
with the help of Benjamin Franklin. 

Partnerships and corporations get the 
attention of Wall Street. Cooperatives 
give the action across the board Watch 
AGRICULTURE MARKETING ASSO- 
CIATES perform. 



STUDENT ALERT! 

In 1986 many students from our state 
universities were attracted to an offer to 
take a spring break to beautiful Daytona 
Beach for eight Florida days/seven nights 
at the Days Inn. All this including round 
trip transportation for only $229. An 
advertisement in the student newspaper 
recruited student representatives to help 
set up this trip with the lure they would 
get a free trip. As it turned out, the stu- 
dents who paid the $229 ended up in 
Jacksonville with no accommodations. 
The students had to wire home for 
money and find their own rooms. They 
are still trying to get refunds. 

The Cumberland County Consumer 
Affairs Bureau is issuing a warning to all 
students who are planning a trip during 
their Easter break to be sure the travel 
agency is a familiar one that has been 
established and can be checked out. 

Below is a list of agencies you can call 
to check out the company before you in- 
vest your money: Cumberland County 
Bureau of Consumer Affairs: 249-1133, 
ext. 251; 249-5802; Toll-free west shore 
697-0371, ext. 251; Toll-free Shippen- 
burg 532-7286, ext. 251. Better Busi- 
ness Bureau: 1-291-1151. Pa. Bureau of 
Consumer Protection: 1-800-441-2555: 
787-7109. 



PREREGISTRATION 
SCHEDULE 

All day students will preregister for 
1987 spring semester courses on October 
31, November 3, 4, 5, 1986 Preregis- 
tration will be scheduled in Department 
Chairperson's or assigned Advisor's of- 
fices. Schedule is posted on campus bul- 
letin board. 



EQUESTRIAN TEAM 
RESULTS 

by JoAnna Toenniessen 

Results of the Third Intercollegiate 
Horse Show hosted by Moravian College 
and Lehigh University on October 26, 
1986. 

Advanced Walk-Trot 

Ann Bastian — 4th 

Beginner Walk-Trot-Canter 

Donna Forte — 1st 

Debbie Osterling — 2nd 

Julie Kopack — 3rd 

Anna Smyrychynski — 4th 

Novice on the Flat 

Joan Comly — 4th 

Joell Pursel - 5th 

Jimmy Whitfield — 6th 

Intermediate on the Flat 

Lori McCutcheon — 4th 
Missy Branigan — 6th 

Open on the Flat 

Darlene Cernohorsky — 1st 

Tony Delise — 2nd 

Beth Meny — 4th 

Leslie Ward — 6th 

Novice Fences 

Theresa Kothstein — 1st 

Joan Comly — 5th 
Lori McCutcheon — 5th 

Open Fences 

Leslie Ward - 3rd 

Intermediate Fences 

Darlene Cernohorsky — 1st 

Missy Branigan — 3rd 

Melanie O'Neill - 3rd 

Beth Meny — 5th 

Darlene Cernohorsky was Reserve 
High Point Rider of the day 

DVC came in third for the day with 26 
points behind Rutgers and Princeton. 
After three shows, we are still in second 
place in the Region behind Rutgers. 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 

INTERVIEWS FOR THE 

WEEK OF NOVEMBER 3 

Monday, November 3 

PERDUE. INC. 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Tuesday, November 4 

PERDUE. INC. 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

PERDUE IS LOOKING FOR THE 

FOLLOWING MAJORS: 

Agribusiness 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Business Administration 

Dairy Husbandry 

Food Industry 

SIGN-UP IN THE PLACEMENT 
OFFICE FOR ALL INTERVIEWS. 

Prepare to meet 
"The Ultimate Challenger 

November 18, 1986 
12-5 p.m. • All- Purpose Room 

OUR GOAL IS 150 PINTS 
Blood Donation sign-up sheets 
are available in every dorm. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Oe/ Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: Cooler Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

Areo's Best Lunches 11 AM-3 PM 

Hoppy Hour 4-6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
346-1968 



■ 



s = 


Soccer 


F = 


Football 


WBB m 


Women's Basketball 


MBB = 


Men's Basketball 


CC = 


Cross Country 



Delaware Valley College 
1986 NOVEMBER 1986 




Sunday 



Monday 



Tuesday 



Wednesday 



Thursday 



Friday 



Saturday 




Look for Specials! 

■ 

gejt§ && fife 








F/Lebanon Valley/ A/1 :30 

HILLEL HAYRIDE 

Dance Band 'Ritz' 

(9-12 midnight) - APR 



2 



3 



Equestrian Show 

at Beaver 

8 a.m. 



BOWlBflBKO 




4 



S/Washington/H/3 p.m. 




Election Day 



5 



6 



S/Moravian/H/3 p.m. 



7 



8 



FINAL 
PREREGISTRATION 

"NO CLASSES" 

MOVIE: Back to the Future 
APR - 9 p.m. 




FOLLOW 

A 

WEDNESDAY 

SCHEDULE 



F/Lycoming/H/l:30 p.m. 
CC/Mac at Gettysburg 

Partying it up! 



9 



10 



11 



12 



Equestrian Show at DVC 
Stepping Stone Farm — 8a.m. 

DVC at the Vet 
Eagles vs. Giants 

Bus leaves at 2 p.m. 
Game starts at 4 p.m. 



iieu, wu n&cp 0e ffSs ^F 



13 




Veterans' Day 





Bucks County Singers 

APR 8-10 p.m. 

Caesar's TOGA Party 
Sponsored by the '87 Class 



16 



17 



18 







WBB/F&M Scrimage/H/7 p.m. 

"BLOOD MOBILE" 
APR - 12 to 6 p.m. 

MOVIE: 

Somewhere in Time 

APR - 9 p.m. 



19 



20 



4-H Square Dance 
Gym — 8 p.m. 

Faculty Development 
Committee Lecture — APR 



CAESAR'S 
VACATION PUB 

This is the one! 

Bring those suitcases 

and good luck! 




15 



F/WiIkes/H/l:30p.m. 



MOVIES 
CAESAR'S 8 p.m. 



Friends of Football 
Dinner - APR 

4:30 to 9:00 p.m. 



21 



MBB/Cabrini/A/8p.m. 



22 



Hillel Auction 
APR 



23 



24 



30 

Thanksgiving Break 

continues until 

December 2nd at 8:30 a.m. 




25 



MBB/Eastern/A/8 p.m. 

Thanksgiving Break 
Begins at 4 p. m. 




Enjoy some good food! 




28 



29 





Thanksgiving Day 



WBB/Callaudel Tour/ A/6 p.m. 



MBB/Ursinus/A/7:30 p.m. 
WBB/Callaudel Tour/ A/2 p.m. 




poRi 



by John Litzke 

The 1986 Women's Volleyball season 
ended this week with the ladies finishing 
with a fairly respectable 7-9 record. The 
underclassmen ushered out the season 
for senior, of which there were only two. 
outstanding setter Vicki Keener and re- 
serve Chris Gerlach. Congratulations to 
both. 

Now let's turn back the clock and give 
you an update of the final seven games. 

Back on October 16 DVC visited Scran - 
ton for an inter-league match-up. It was 
an evenly contested match although the 
Lady Royals swept 15-11. 15-9. 15-10 




^VV2-Up 



Volleyball Finishes Season at 7-10 



Next the Lady Vikings from Upsala 
sailed into James Work Stadium on Sa- 
turday. October 18th with volleyball in 
hand and feet in mouths. DVC and Up- 
sala fought athletically and verbally, to a 
fifth game and Upsala unfortunately, 
came out on top with a 3-2 win. DVC 
jumped out to quite a commanding 2-0 
lead but the advantage slipped away. 

The Lady Aggies traveled to Allentown 
College to face the host and Swarthmore 
in a tri-match. In their first match Swarth- 
more, in a best out of three match, won 
two straight and dropped the Aggies fairly 
easily. In their second and final contest, 
DVC fought the Lady Centaurs of Allen - 
town to the bitter end in a fine effort, but 



Allentown edged DVC for the two games 
to one victory. 

Versus Kings last Saturday, the Lady 
Aggies pulled together as a team and dis- 
played some fine spikes and acrobatic 
saves and won fairly easily in three straight. 
Although momentum hasn't meant much 
in the World Series momentum played a 
part when Muhlenberg visited and DVC 
took a thoroughly commanding 2-0 lead. 
The Lady Mules fought back to unbe- 
lievably capture the final three games 
and the match 3-2. (15-11, 15-7. 3-15, 
10-15, 11-15 were the scores.) 

Messiah was the foe Tuesday night. At 
6-9 the Lady Aggies were out of any play- 
off contention but Keener, Dollarton, 



Chapman, Hajioannou, Bradley, and 
Stackhouse wanted to end their season 
with a flare and a win. 

The quicker, better prepared Messiah 
team proved to be too much for DVC in 
their final match of the season. Messiah 
swept DVC in three straight 15-1, 15-8. 
and 15-6 and put DVC just under .500 
at 7-10, 3-2 in the MAC and 25-28 in 
games. With the loss of Vicki Keener at 
setter a huge void will be present in the 
middle hit. With lots of hard work a new 
middle hitter will be molded and needless 
to say. Coach Fox is looking forward to 
next season. Congratulations to all the 
ladies. 




Halfback Dee Pisauro and halfback Deb Masculli 
battle in practice 

Athlete of the Week: 

The Delaware Valley College field 
hockey team finished with a respectable 
6-6- 1 record and a vital part of DVC's fine 
season was our Athlete of the Week, 
sophomore, left winger. Dee Pisauro. 

For the season. Dee had a team high 
eight goals and. just recently. Dee had 
outstanding performances versus Albright 
when she broke a 0-0 tie scoring the 
game winner in double overtime and 
against Wilkes when her two goal per- 
formance paced DVC to the 2-0 shutout 
victory. 

The Ewing Township, N.J. native and 
Ewing High School graduate will have 
two more seasons with DVC's hockey 
team and Coach Pam Spotts has to feel 
happy about that. For her hard work, 
dedication and goal-scoring ability. Dee 
Pisauro has been named Athlete of the 
Week. Congratulations on a job well 
done. 




• * • ^^* * * 

* * *^^T * * * 



H 



EAGLES TICKETS 

Tickets for the Philadelphia Eagles — 
NY. Giants game, November 9 are on 
sale now, in the Dean of Students Office. 
The price is $14. This includes transpor- 
tation by bus, to and from Vet. Stadium. 
Sponsored by the Student Government. 



WOMEN 
FACE ALBRIGHT 

DVC's women's cross country team 
scrimmagd against a strong Albright team 
on Saturday, October 25. The air was 
cool and sill, the sky cloudy and track 
conditions were fair. It was homecoming 
at Albright which put a little extra pressure 
on both teams. 

Monica Etzweiler came in sixth place 
with a time of 21 :45 (season best for Mon- 
ica) . Trish Moorzitz came in ninth place 
with a time of 22:36 and Kathy Lunova 
came in 13th place with a time of 26:59 
(also a season best) . 

The next meet is MAC's at Gettyburg 
on Saturday. November 8th. The record 
for the season is 4-3. 

Pisauro's OT Goal 
Lifts DVC 

by Brian Taggart 

Thursday the DVC ladies took on 
Wilkes. After one full half of battling, the 
game stood at a 0-0 tie. The second half 
proved to be just as exciting as the first 
and though it also ended with no score, 
the defense of both teams was excellent . 
The whole team pulled together in double 
OT. Exceptional effort by Lisa Long. 
Karen Rynkowski, and Jackie Helflick. 
helped set up Dee Pisauro's game winning 
goal, scored with just under five minutes 
left in double OT. Debbie Masculli aided 
the goal with the assist. The game was 
one of the more exciting ones this year, 
with it ending Delaware Valley College 
victors, 1-0. 

Mets Win It All 
Johnston is Pool Victor 

The 1986 World Series concluded 
Monday night and what a memorable 
series and playoff it was. It will take some- 
thing enormous to match it. 

Who will forget the Dave Henderson 
home run in the seventh game to send 
Boston into the series, or the extra inning 
Met comeback in game six of the series. 
Both teams are champs. 

Then there was "Downtown" Daniel 
Johnston who edged out Donna "the 
hammer" Hayek to capture the 1986 
Ram Pages World Series Pool. Daniel 
wins himself three coupons for free food 
from Caesar's Pub. Congratulations Dan 
and congratulations to the World Cham- 
pion New York Mets and to the American 
League Champion Boston Red Sox. 



AEROBICS CLASS 
IS FORMING 

Monday, November 3 
Wednesday, November 5 

from 4:15 to 5:45 

Come and Bring a Friend! 

Be Prompt! 

Idle E.M.O. Holds onto 
Number Ranking 

1. Miami (FL) 7-0 

2. Alabama 7-0 

3. Nebraska 6-0 

4. Michigan 6-0 

5. Oklahoma 5-1 

6. Penn State 6-0 

7. Auburn 6-0 

8. Arizona State 5-0-1 

9. Washington 5-1 

10. E.M.O .4-0 

11. Texas A&M 5-1 

12.L.S.U 4-1 

13. Arizona . 5-1 

14. Mississippi State . . . 6-1 

15. Arkansas 5-1 

16. Clemson . 5-1 

17.U.C.L.A 4-2 

18. Stanford 5-1 

19. Southern Methodist 5-1 

20. Ohio State 5-2 

21. Southern California 4-2 

22. Georgia 4-2 

23. Baylor 4-3 

24. North Carolina State 4-1-1 

25. North Carolina 4-1-1 

AGRICULTURAL 
MARKETING ASSOCIATES 

Agricultural Marketing Associates an- 
nounces the products they will offer to 
the public and its stockholders. 

They will feature Pennsylvania Maple 
Syrup that will be available in quarts and 
pints; plain and butter roasted Georgia 
pecans; and Tom Surgis pretzels. 

These excellent quality foods can be 
purchased and orders given. 

Orders can be given for these excellent 
quality foods now. Contact the Agribusi- 
ness Department. 

Watch us perform. 




Sports Quiz 

QUESTION #8: 

The 1986-87 National Hockey League 
has its season well under way. So how 
about a little hockey tidbit to ponder. 
What two expansion teams were added 
to the NHL in 1974? (Hint: One of the 
teams folded and the other is still around.) 

Congratulations to Mike "Big 2" Zendt. 
Mike answered the question: In Super 
Bowl VIII, the Pittsburgh Steelers held 
the Minnesota Vikings to just 1 19 yards 
in total offense. Name the starting Steeler 
defense known as the "Steel Curtain" who 
accomplished this feat? 
ANSWER: 

L.C. Greenwood Mean Joe Greene 
Ernie Holmes Dwight White 

Jack Ham Jack Lambert 

Andy Russell Mel Blount 

Mike Wagner Donnie Shell 

Glen Edwards 

If you think you have the answer to 
this week's question all you have to do is 
jot your answer, name and box number 
on a slip of paper and put it in Box 951 
For Mike's correct answer, he will receive 
a coupon for a free meal at Caesar's Pub 
You could be next! 




Library Leaf 

Students quite often leave notes, book- 
marks, etc. in books they return to the 
library. Following is a list of things to do 
found on one such note. The library staff 
thought this list should be published in 
Ram Pages so that all students could read, 
comtemplate and benefit from its timely 
reminder. t 

In big lettering and underlined is, Term 
Paper. In smaller lettering are the phrases, 
"wash socks" and "write letters." In the 
same smaller lettering, but with an explana- 
tion mark, are the words. "Be scholarly." 

Certainly this is a list for all of us to live 
by. 



INDIANS AMBUSH MISTAKE-PRONE AGGIES 



by John Litzke 

The late 20's and early 30's were treach- 
erous times for Americans. It is this past 
week that we remember the stock market 
crash of 1929 and all the sacrifices and 
pressures that our grandparents had to 
endure. And let us not forget that we cele- 
brate the rise of the hunting dogs, the 
witching hour, the gifts of sweets to little 
ghouls, monsters, strawberry shortcakes, 
and he-man's this week as well. 

Last Saturday was a treacherous time 
for the Delaware Valley College football 
squad. Head Coach Al Wilson and his 
troops trekked up to Juniata College, 
stayed overnight, and awoke to the un- 
certainty and misfortune of the 20's and 
30's. There would be no sweets for Dela- 
ware Valley on this day. 

Powered by the arm of Juniata quarter 
back Mike Culver, who completed his 
first nine passes on his way to a 10 of 12 
passing day for 139 yards and three 
touchdowns, Juniata swept past the Ag- 
gies quite easily 40-8. 

It was four key turnovers that hurt 
Delaware Valley a great deal in the game 
as did six Juniata sacks of quarterback 
Clay Butterworth. 



In the first half the scoring was all In- 
dians. At 5:09 of the first quarter following 
a fumble by quarterback Clay Butterworth 
and a recovery by Juniata linebacker 
Greg St. Clair, quarterback Culver hit 
flanker Dan Crossey with a 25-yard pass 
and Crossey raced down the sidelines for 
the score. The ensuing extra point by 
kicker Keith Watson made it 7-0. 

Into the second quarter we go. At 
12:20 running back Ian Malee romped in 
from seven yards out and increased the 
lead to 14-0. The second scoring drive 
went for 85 yards on 12 plays. This would 
turn out to be Juniata's most productive 
quarter. The ensuing kickoff by Juniata is 
fumbled by DVC and recovered by spe- 
cialist Bryan Womer on the DVC 26-yard 
line. They say lightning doesn't strike in 
the same spot but today it did as on the 
following play Culver hit junior split end 
Frank Phelps on a 26-yard endzone strike 
to give Juniata a comfortable 21-0 ad- 
vantage. 

Following the next DVC series, Juni- 
ata romped 67 yards on nine plays cul- 
minating in Culver's third touchdown 
pass of the day on a four-yard strike to 
one of his favorite receivers Ian Malee. 




Workhorse, junior tailback Jim Wilson is perhaps 
the brightest light in a tough season offensively 
for DVC 



The extra point was missed and the teams 
entered the respective locker rooms with 
the Injuns up 27-0. The first half stats 
showed Juniata's dominance. The Indians 
lead in first downs 12-5 and probably the 
most prevelant, eye-opening stat was total 
offense as Juniata compiled 247 yards to 
DVC's 95. 

The second half began with both coa- 
ches emptying their benches. Juniata had 
first possession. On the third play of the 
series, quarterback Chris Davis hit Donald 
Betar with a pass, Betar fumbled on a 
crushing hit by Rich Simononis and Simo 
recovered on their own 47. This was the 
spark DVC needed. Just when DVC got 
moving the spark quickly dimmed as QB 
Clay Butterworth was intercepted by de- 
fensive back Mark Dorner who returned 
it 76 yards for the score to make it 34-0. 

The fourth quarter saw flanker Roy 
Smith receiving a touchdown pass from 
QB Chris Davis and the missed extra 
point made it 41-0. The game was Juni- 
ata's. DVC would score midway through 
the final quarter when Tom Lewandowski 
scampered 20 yards for the score and 
Jay Wood added the two point conver- 
sion to make the final 40-8. 




fc^A^-Up 



LITZKE'S 
SPORTS' BRIEFS 

by John Litzke 

• First place Pittsburgh Penguins hand 
Flyers their first loss of the season. 
Flyers faced the North Stars, Islanders 
and Nordiques this week and will face 
Boston Sat. night. The Capitals as 
of Sun. are running third with nine 
points, three behind the Flyers and 
seven behind Pittsburgh . New Jersey is 
.500 at 4-4 and the Islanders and 
Rangers have seven and six points 
respectively. Stanley Cup champ Mon- 
treal is out to a slow start at 3-3- 1 and 
the "Gretzky" Oilers are one above 
.500 at 5-4. 

• The Sixers faced New Jersey in their 
final exhibition Tuesday and the whole 
schmigiggy starts tonight with Indiana 
at the Spectrum . 

• In major college football action last Sat. 
it was: 

Colorado 20, Nebraska 
Syracuse 27, Temple 24 
Penn St. 23, Alabama 3 
Penn 24, Yale 6 
Pitt 56, Navy 6 
Michigan 38, Indiana 14 
Oklahoma 38, Iowa St. 
Texas 27, SMU 24 
Iowa 27, Northwestern 20 
Auburn 35, Mississippi St. 6 
Washington 38, Oregon 3 
Ohio St. 33, Minnesota 
Georgia 31, Kentucky 9 
Colgate 54, Columbia 8 
Connecticut 35, Maine 19 
Dayton 54, Frostburg St. 
North Dakota St. 63, Morningside 
Montana 59, Montana St. 28 
Marshall 63, Davidson 14 
Tennessee St. 52, Morgan St. 
UCLA 54, Washington St. 16 

• In college football games of interest: 
West Chester 37, Cheyney 6 
Widener 42, Upsala 8 
Millersville 36, Bloomsburg 3 
Kutztown 36, Mansfield 34 



Susquehanna 61, Lebanon Valley 6 
Wilkes 38, Albright 7 
Villanova 34, Ursinus 16 
Rutgers 35, Army 7 
Delaware 28, Lehigh 17 
Lycoming 17, Moravian 15 
Muhlenberg 10, Gettysburg 7 
Delaware St. 10, Towson St. 6 

• All the controversy surrounding Mary- 
land basketball coach Lefty Driesell 
seems to have been resolved as he is 
reportedly near. Driesell has reportedly 
been offered $1 million dollars over 
nine years and Driesell is expected to 
approve the deal this week to extend 
17-year coaching career at Maryland. 
The scars of Len Bias will always be 
with him although. 

• In Division I men's college soccer last 
Sat. it was: 

Temple 1, Drexel 
Allentown 5, Baird 
Delaware 2, Bucknell 1 
Haverford 4, Widener 
Lafayette 1, Rider 
Phila. Textile 4, St. Joseph's 1 
Spring Garden 6, Lincoln 1 
Ursinus 3, FDU 

• NBA has plans to expand in 1990 or 
1991. Cities vying for a team are 
Miami, Orlando, Minneapolis, Char- 
lotte, N.C. and Orange County, CA. 
NBA plans to give teams to three of the 
five cities mentioned. 

• In week eight of the NFL season it was: 
Philadelphia 23, San Diego 7 
Denver 20, Seattle 13 

NY. Jets 28. New Orleans 23 
Pittsburgh 30, Cincinnati 9 
Chicago 13, Detroit 7 
Cleveland 23, Minnesota 20 
Miami 17, Indianapolis 13 
Kansas City 27, Tampa Bay 20 
New England 23, Buffalo 3 
San Francisco 31, Green Bay 17 
LA. Raiders 28, Houston 17 
Dallas 37, Houston 6 
LA. Rams 14, Atlanta 7 
Mon. night it was: 
N.Y. Giants 27, Washington 20 

• Week *9 will have: 
Philadelphia at St. Louis 
Atlanta at New England 
Buffalo at Tampa Bay 
Cincinnati at Detroit 
Cleveland at Indianapolis 
Dallas at N.Y. Giants 
Green Bay at Pittsburgh 
Houston at Miami 

San Francisco at New Orleans 
Denver at LA. Raiders 



Kansas City at San Diego 
N.Y. Jets at Seattle 
Minnesota at Washington 
Monday night it will be: 
LA. Rams at Chicago 

• Who had big days last Sun . in the 
NFL: Let's take a look. Eric Dickerson: 
30 carries, 170 yds. rushing (tops 1,000 
yds). Curt Warner: 21 carries, 139 
yds. rushing. Randy Wright: Green 
Bay quarterback was 30 of 54 for 328 
yds. Warren Moon: Houston quarter- 
back was 18 of 46 for 304 yds. Drew 
Hill: Houston receiver had 7 catches 
for 138 yds. Mike Sherrard: Dallas re- 
ceiver had 5 catches for 111 yds. 

•The World Series: Mets take 1986 
World Series following their 8-5 game 
7 victory. Ray Knight was chosen as 
MVP. What a series! 

• In high school football last week it was: 
Northeast 27, Lincoln 7 

Dobbins 28, Edison 
Frankford 33, Mastbaum 
Gratz 12, Germantown 6 
Central 15, Roxborough 14 
Franklin 20, Overbrook 
Washington 18, Olney 
Bartram 33, University City 6 
Bok 12, Southern 6 
N. Catholic 3, Arch. Ryan 
Bishop McDevitt 7, Arch. Wood 
Bishop Egan 14, LaSalle 13 
Father Judge 28, Card. Dougherty 7 
St. James 17, Msgr. Bonner 7 
Arch. Carroll 17, St. John Neumann 8 
St. Joseph's 21, W. Catholic 14 
Lower Moreland 23, Wissahickon 13 
William Tennent 28, Bensalem 22 
Neshaminy 28, Truman 
Council Rock 14, Pennsbury 10 
Abington 7, North Penn 3 
Penn Wood 29, Sun Valley 3 
Coatesville 41, Great Valley 14 
Downington 41, Boyertown 
O.J. Roberts 13, W.C. Henderson 6 
W. Philadelphia 14, Martin L. King 12 
Arch. Kennedy 19, H-Horsham 12 
Spring-Ford 30, Lansdale Catholic 
Upper Merion 54, Cheltenham 6 
Souderton 43, Methacton 29 
Upper Dublin 42, Springfield 14 
C.B. West 16, Pennridge 14 
C.B East 19, Norristown 



FREE ENTERPRISE 
PROGRAM 

DVC and the Caritas Foundation an- 
nounced details regarding the establish- 
ment of the Caritas Institute at the col- 
lege at a luncheon held Wed., October 
29. 

The purpose of the Caritas Institute at 
DVC is to promote the ideas of free en- 
terprise, free market and personal free- 
dom. The Institute was officially estab- 
lished with a luncheon program on 
Wed., October 29, 1986. The luncheon 
was held in the Student Center from 
11:45a. m.-l p.m. The guest speaker for 
this program was Mr. Robert H. Miller, 
Regional Administrator, Mid-Atlantic 
Region, U.S. Small Business Adminis- 
tration. Mr. Miller addressed the theme 
of "SB. A. and The Entrepreneur: Ser- 
vices, Trends and Suggestions." 

Plans for the future of the Institute in- 
clude additional luncheons, seminars, 
lectures and an annual dinner. Informa- 
tion on the Caritas Institute can be ob- 
tained by contacting Mr. West at ext. 
2232 or Dr. Montileone at ext. 2221. 

DVC Board of Trustees 
News from the President 

The Board of Trustees, at its 90th 
Annual Meeting held on October 19, 
1986, reelected for a one-year term the 
following as Officers of the Board and 
the Corporation: 

Kenneth W. Gemmill, Chm. 

Arthur Poley, Vice Chm. 

Gene W. Fickes, Treasurer „ 

Jean H. Work, Secretary 

Edward Rosewater, Asst. Secretary 

Joshua Feldstein, President 

until his retirement on June 30. 1987 

The following additional Officers of the 
Corporation were reelected for a one- 
year term: 
Elmer G. Reiter, Jr. , Asst. Treasurer 
Willetta K. Gourley, Asst. Secretary 

The following Board Members whose 
term expired in November 1986 were re- 
elected for a three-year term : 

Richard A. Bailey 

Kenneth W. Gemmill 

J. Franklin Hartzel, Esq. 

Joel Hillman, II 

William H. Merz 

Myron J. Nickman 

Edward Rosewater 

Daniel Tanner 

Jean H. Work 




DMaiwaoo® Wlfl(^ ©sfliks®© 



Vol. XXI, No. 10 

Friday, November 7, 1986 




NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



All the news 
that fits, 
we print! 



THE EQUESTRIAN TEAM 
Facts and Myths 

by Claudia Beck 

This is my second year on the Eques- 
trian Team here at DVC and I am still 
surprised at the many misconceptions 
people have about the team. 

MYTH: The team is only for girls. 
Fact: Not true. Some of our best riders 
are guys, even though most of the team 
consists of girls. 

MYTH: You have to have a horse to be 
a member of the team. 
Fact: Most of the people on the team do 
not own horses; a few do. but these peo- 
ple are rare. 

MYTH: It costs a lot. You have to have 
a lot of money to be on the team. 
Fact: It only costs a member $10.00 a 
semester for lessons, all other expenses 
are paid for by the team's annual allow- 
ance, supplied by the college. 

MYTH: The Equestrian Team is a club. 
Fact: The team is a sport. For freshmen 
it equals one gym credit, and for upper- 
classmen it is called Horsemanship (and 
still equals one credit) . 

MYTH: A member has to go to horse 

shows. 

Fact: Some colleges do require their 

riders to show, but no one has to if he or 

she doesn't want to. 

MYTH: People have to try out to be on 
the team. 

Fact: Everyone who wants to be a mem- 
ber can become one. at any level of 
riding. 

MYTH: Only the best riders are allowed 

to show. 

Fact: Everyone is allowed to show if 

they want to go. and if the entries are 

unlimited. 



MYTH: The team consists of only English 
riders. 

Fact: We do have a Western team at 
DVC, it is not as well known as the En- 
glish team but by next year it should have 
regular lessons and offer regular credits. 

MYTH: Nothing ever happens. We never 
hear anything about the team. 
Fact: There are activities happening 
almost every weekend with horse shows 
and team meetings. 

MYTH: A rider has to have excellent 
grades to be on the team. 
Fact: There is no required G.P.A. for 
members. All officers must have a G.P.A. 
of 2.0. 

MYTH: A person must have ridden be- 
fore college. 

Fact: Students can start as freshmen, 
some people who do are very enthusiastic 
and go to advanced levels very quickly. 

Hopefully everyone will come to Step- 
ping Stone Farm on November 9 to see 
our show. We host 10 other teams and 
ride against them at each show. Last 
year we were the first team in our region, 
and showed in special classes at Nationals 
called the Cartier Cup classes. 

If you plan to attend, here are the di- 
rections to Stepping Stone Farm: Take 
202 bypass to the end. Make a right and 
follow to the light. Make a right onto 
313. Follow 313 to the intersection of 
263. Cross over 263 onto Forest Grove 
Rd. Follow Forest Grove Rd. through 
town (on right there is a Presbyterian 
Church) as entering Forest Grove town. 
It is 1.4 miles to Dark Hollow Rd. from 
the church. Make a right onto Dark Hol- 
low Rd . Farm is on the right about V<\ of 
a mile in. 



World of Primates 
Repairs 



— Lecture — 

Wednesday, November 19, 1986 

JOHN D. CAPUTO, Ph.D. 

Department of Philosophy, 
Villanoua University 

A Philosopher Looks at 
Technological Culture 

What perspective can a humanist bring 
to bear on the extraordinary expansion 
of technology in our age? What has this 
revolution done to our understanding of 
the human self, of art, of truth, of the 
traditional meaning of humanities? What 
is the difference between modern tech- 
nology and classical craftsmanship? 

Support provided by the Pennsylvania 
Humanities Council. 

HALLOWEEN 
IN THE PUB 

by M. Brangan 

Halloween Pub Night was a great suc- 
cess for the Horticulture Club. The Pub 
was packed with everyone in costume. 
Congratulations go to Joe (Joelina) Ryan 
who won the costume contest in his 
stunning red dress. Everyone was danc- 
ing and having a great time. Let's hope 
that clubs will sponsor many more suc- 
cessful Pub nights. 



Prepare to meet 
"The Ultimate Challenger 

November 18, 1986 

12-5 p.m. • All-Purpose Room 

OUR GOAL IS 150 PINTS 

Blood Donation sign-up sheets 
are available in every dorm. 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 

INTERVIEWS FOR THE 

WEEK OF NOVEMBER 10 

Wednesday, November 12 

ATLANTIC BREEDERS 
Individual interviews 3-5 p.m. 

GREENTREE NURSERIES 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Thursday, November 13 

ATLANTIC BREEDERS 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

NORTHWEST MUTUAL 

INSURANCE CO. 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

ARGUS RESEARCH LABS 

Internships 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

SIGNUP IN THE PLACEMENT 
OFFICE FOR ALL INTERVIEWS. 



The outdoor viewing islands in the 
World of Primates exhibit at the Philadel- 
phia Zoo will be off-limits to the animals 
in the exhibit for at least two to four 
weeks. This time will allow Zoo staff and 
construction workers to locate and repair 
areas that have been causing water leaks 
in the exhibit since it opened in June of 
this year. 

The World of Primates is the Zoo's 
most ambitious project to date and be- 
cause of the complicated design of the 
exhibit, some problems were to be ex- 
pected . Some leakage was noticed short- 
ly after the exhibit was completed, but 
rather than delay the public opening of 
this unique attraction during the Zoo's 
busiest season, Zoo President Bill Don- 
aldson felt it was best to go on with the 
opening as planned in June and then 
make necessary repairs later on in the 
season. 

On September 7, crews began repairs 
to the lining of the large moat area sur- 
rounding the gorilla, gibbon and drill 
islands and which was felt at that time to 
be the source of the leaking. Although 
some holes were found in the moat lining 
and were subsequently repaired, none of 
these holes was believed large enough to 
be the cause of the continual leaking the 
exhibit is still encountering. According to 
the Zoo's Projects Manager, Chris Wen- 
ner, "Water levels in the large moat have 
continued to drop as much as a foot 
overnight. On several occasions, the 
water dropped 3-5 feet overnight in the 
small moat as well." 

Wenner is overseeing pressure tests 
currently being done on suction and re- 
turn lines in the exhibit and says that 
these tests have been completed in four 
of five areas where it was felt the problem 
might be . Two of the four areas tested re- 
quired excavation and repairs to the pipe- 
lines involved. Now, according to Wen- 
ner, what remains is to test nearly 450 
feet of return pipelines in the large moat 
area, much of the piping being buried 
under concrete, stone and lining materi- 
als. To accomplish this testing, the Zoo is 
bringing in a portable scanner that is sen- 
sitive to the movement of water through 
the ground, even when it is buried as our 
pipe is. The scanner follows along the 
pipeline, and instruments attached to its 
machinery should pinpoint where any 
break might be. 

Once crews have determined where 
the leak is, work will begin to repair what- 
ever damage has been caused . The two 
to four week period is estimated to allow 
time to make repairs, to refill the moats 
and to test the effectiveness of the re- 
pairs. Once the situation is corrected, 
primates in the exhibit will once again be 
able to go outside onto their islands. 

The World of Primates has been one 
of the most popular exhibits in the Zoo's 
history and has given visitors the chance 
to see gorillas, gibbons, drills, ring-tailed 
lemurs, Geoffroy's marmosets and orang-, 
utans up close, living in natural, jungle- 
like settings. The Zoo is especially anx- 



ious to correct the problems being en- 
countered in the exhibit so that Zoo visi- 
tors, as well as exhibit residents like 
John, Samantha, Gibby and Wilbur, can 
once again enjoy both the outdoor as 
well as the indoor areas in this exciting 
exhibit. 

Aggies 3, Rams 1 

Dear Editors, 

In response to the question, "Is it time 
for a change?" concerning our name the 
"Aggies," no it isn't. This college was 
founded with agriculture in mind and has 
sustained itself quite well for the past 90 
years. 

I've been an Aggie for four years now 
and I'm proud to be one because I'm 
proud of the reputation of the college 
and of the education I'm getting here. 
This is a unique college because of the 
type and quality of education offered 
here. 

I am an Aggie because of the college's 
background. I can always be an Aggie, 
but I could never be a Ram. 

If you want to be a Ram, try going to 
Farm III. 

Sincerely, 
Mario Galanti 

Food Committee Meeting 

There will be an open meeting with 
the members of the Food Committee on 
Monday, November 10 at 4:15 p.m. 
This meeting will be held in the Student 
Government Room on the second floor 
of the Student Center. 

Come on over and meet Clair, Greg 
and Dave. They're the student represen- 
tatives on the Food Committee this year. 
Bring your ideas and suggestions to 
these guys. 

If you have signed a petition or have 
complained about the food service at the 
Dining Hall or at the Snack Bar, make 
your thoughts turn into action by at- 
tending this meeting! 



+ * * * 

This Week on 
Campus 

by Wendy L. Unger 
FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 7 

Follow a Wednesday schedule. 
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8 

Football (H) vs. Lycoming. 1:30 p 
Cross Country. MAC Champtonshps 
at Gettysburg 

SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 9 

Equestrian Show {H) at Stepping 
Stone Farm, 8 am 
DVC at the Vet: Eagles vs. Giants, 
leaves at 2 p.m. 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER It 

48 days untf Christmas?! 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11 

Veteran's Day! 
THURSDAY. NOVEMBER tt 

Bucks County Singers, 8-10 p.m in 

the APR, 

TOGA PARTY at Caesar's!" 












: 



Personals 



Lori O. — Thanks for lifting my spirits 
after our talk Saturday noon. — J. P. 

Lynn I. — Why weren't we invited to 
Warrington Country Club? 

Alfred Dunhill Ltd., London — Who are 
you to judge class? Obviously you don't 
have none. — Marilyn 

For adoption — Young girl, acts the age 
of seven, potty trained, used to neglect 
and is well disciplined, answers to the 
name Tracy or Sally. All adoption ap- 
plications to be sent to Box 550. 
Mushy — Stare much! — M & K 

Boz — You won't get there any faster us- 
ing margarine instead of butter. — Chelle 

Karen — Fall down the stairs lately? — 

Kell 

Sue — About the escalator at the mall. . . 

and that man's butt... love your roomy! 

Mooshka — We love your shirt esp. at 
the NBI. - Chelle & Kell 

25 bottles on one table at one time, a 
record? NBI 10/26/86. - Chelle & Kell 

Roomie — Wanta dig a tree? — Digging 
roomie 

ID User — Wanta go to Penny's? 

Tracy — How many majors to go? — Ivy 

Roomie — "I used to ride with him," 
"Horses?" 

Tony — How long do you wait before 
you stop looking? — Ivy 

Anth — It takes two to tango. We can 
dance only if you don't step on my toes, 
or have you found another partner? 
YFFA 

Linda — If you think paybacks are a 
bitch, wait 'til you see pay-paybacks! — 
Swollen-kneed-slime accomplis 

Lisa — Go ahead take them (friendly) for 
all they have, that stuff might kill your 
baby fishies! — P.S. 

Hey Dippy — You'll be a trainee for 
years at that rate. — P.S. (just kidding) 

Dippy — How's your bike? — P.S. 
Twitter 1 — Name the place and time we 
can start that baby fern! — Twitter 3 

Between lands Teck and Botany I think 
I'm going to have a nervous breakdown . 
-ME 

TAKE, TAKE ME HOME! 

Sleazestack — But my roommate likes 

my jail bait. 

Sleazestack & Chipmunk — I don't need 

psychological help, he's getting it now. 

Ex-33 yr. olds love 

Curt — You still owe me a back rub, 
when? — Trainee on grill 

Seamus & John — "Watch out for those 
farm tractors and gocarts." Your mothers 
were almost part of the MADD group! — 
Jenny 

Barney — Did you ever think you'd 
marry a dairy farmer? 

Art — Maybe next time you'll know bet- 
ter than to give Seamus and Burkhart the 
keys to the tractor and gocart! 

Marvin — Good luck with Craig. Just 
one thing though: You won't win his 
heart by hitting his newly painted car 
with a beer bottle! — Stanley 

Art — Did you slip the other night with 
old Rusty? 

Norton — Just remember he'll be back 
for you, don't cry (I will)! 

Donna — Which man will be in your 
room tonight? HUSEY! 

Wilbert & Art - HAPPY BIRTHDAY. I 
know what you girls want for your birth- 
day! Ewan wants a man that's NOT Rusty 
and Dollarton just wants a McNugget 
with a bow around its waist! 

Girls — First we will CHILL, then we will 
ILL. 

Hey Darryl — I'll tell ya what the bear 
looks like! 

Remember that after the freedom is 
gone, all that remains is rotten pit. 



Seymour — I laughed so much this 
weekend, my face is now permanently 
stationary with a smile. How is yours?!?! 
Super 6 — Oh, I mean Super 7. Let's 
get ready to party next week for the birth- 
day girls: Art and Wilbert!! 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO THE TWO 
MOST HOT, SEXY AND WANTED 
WOMEN ON CAMPUS: ART (Nov. 7) 
and WILBERT (Nov. 8). 

Art — You should try this sometime! 
"First you open the dryer door. Secondly 
you put your little brother inside of the 
dryer. Thirdly you close the door and put 
it on full speed. Then deny it after your 
mother questions you about it. 

"I DONT KNOW, BUT ITS BEEN 
TOLD!" 

Seymour — Maybe you and I should've 
taken lessons from "Jean, Jean, THE 
BEAN MACHINE." 

Norton — Does your right breast have 
comb marks on it? Just make the room 
real dark and only have the X-mas lights 
on!! 

Seymour — Please get out of that bed 
and turn the radio down and put the ceil- 
ing fan on! I might fall out of this bed 
laughing! 

Art — Thanks for such a great time at 
your house. We had a super, super time. 
Let's do it again real soon! 
"Daaaa WAYNE" 

To Rox & Monique — You girls do look 
nice everyday (well, I wouldn't say 
EVERYDAY)! But sometimes you two 
wear too much makeup and hairspray. 
You see, you don't need all of that junk 
because you have what I have, NATU- 
RAL BEAUTY. Yeah, right?!?! 

Girls — Next Halloween Pub Night let's 
all eat an apple (for free, no 25C) and all 
steal the pumpkin and hide it under our 
coats! Of all people to get caught. ME! I 
never do anything wrong or destructive. 
We have to get that little astronaut! She 
will be seeing the stars! 

Junior Farmer — I thought you fixed our 
chair. What happened? — B114 

Helen — So that's how you get such 
good grades. — Yoda & Luke 

G. — Trust me. I don't have a boyfriend. 

I was like that when I was 12. 

"Great blow off Friday night." 

Hope everyone enjoyed my party, but 
what happened to all my cigarettes? 

Julie — We're the best at what we do! 
Rudy Al, run we're caught. We got 
away! — Rudy 

Joe R. — There's only 48 days until 
X-mas! See I told you I'd write it!! 

God & W — Mets winage, Boston 
suckage. 

Pokey — Wanna make a little kid? 

Dr. Carol M.D. — I need a good pres- 
cription! — Boz 

Froot Loop Troop — Sorry about every- 
thing. 1 didn't mean to be this way. — 
Love, Barney 

Barney — Who was that man in your 
bed? " 

Riddles has a hook up. 

Tony — You make my day. — J. P. 

Lori O. — How's your mom? — J. P. 

Lynn I. — Are we going to the club 

tonight? 

Lynn I. — Can we make a right on red? 

No... the sign is back there. 

Tim — You are just plain RUDE!! 

To whom it may concern — Miss Aquar- 
ium 1981 still rules!! 

T.E. - I love you! - R.M. & M.F. 

R.M — Who did your hair? 

God — I can't believe you lost the Great 
Pumpkin! 

Andy — I should have come over by 
myself. 

Miller Hall steps are dangerous, especial- 
ly when intoxicated! 



Pokey — So what man will it be this 
week? D? C? D? - Kaj 

Matt — Can we play with your color- 
forms? - Chelle & Kell 

To all Miller Hall 2nd Girls - The bet is 
on. We dare you! 

Ivy & Sleazestack — Never put your 
sneakers on before looking inside of 
them, there might be green slime inside. 

- Yoda & Luke 

M. — You're beautiful, never shave. 
K, D, B. & M. — Our first road trip, 
11/1/86. 

"Kevin on campus." 

Mike M. — Thanks for the scare! Rudy 
Julie, what did we do? — Rudy 

Kelley — Watch those Miller steps, they 
are deadly! — K 

Henry — Out of Africa! We're going to 
miss you! The M Girls 

Pokey — You won't get there any faster 
using margarine instead of butter! — Boz 

To the transvestites on Sam 1st, Elaine, 
Rappette, Joelina and Albertina — You 
guys really did look like girls!! But Trevor- 
ette, what happened to you?? 

Art — Having fun in chem lab? 

Stanley — Thanks for being so honest! 

Norton — Give blood! 

Norton and Wilbert — I heard you saw a 
live Chippendale show in your room the 
other night. Thanks for inviting me. 

Lori O. — I'll make it back some night. 

Tony — Thanks for the advice. — J. P. 

Lynn I. — Why was the cops behind us? 

Did we do something wrong, or was he 

going to dinner? 

John — How are the apple orchards? 

John — If you want sympathy, you 

know where to find it. 

MM. — Still have those D. Berries? 

Sunshine — Que pasa? 

T.E. — No more Red Lobster dinners. 

Dr. Carol M.D. - Go for Bretlage! 

Henry — The master plan for L & D is 

being carried out. — Boz 

Boz — It could be... only time will tell. 
He's been staring lately!! — Kaj 

Henry — You're such a hot African 
woman!! — Kaj 

Brian Wood — Brian, Brian, you've 
been spending too much time in the cat 
room. — Your SKF partners in crime 

"Moooo Cow" 

Bev & Melissa — What color are the 
silos? 

"Any Questions?" — "Marital status and 
phone number, please." 

No curb crushers please. 

She's gotta nice profile? Huh George! 

Bev — Just because you've had your li- 
sence the longest doesn't mean you 
don't have to use the brakes. 

Twitter *2 - What a class? - Twitter *1 

Tracy — What did you do-dobie? — 
Rudy 

King Crab — How did he figure it out? 

— Swordfish 

Steph — The hearing aid is on order! — 
Rudy 

God — Thanks for the nickname, it 
comes in handy. — K 

Pokey — No more check writing, it's bad 
luck. C will remember B-3. 

Pokey — Writing on the wall. Don't have 
a hissy and C4J! - K 

Pokey — Send flowers! That's the cheap- 
est and fastest way to end it! — R & Boz 

Marvin — What's a paylus antsidopsida? 

Seymour — You look nice today, even if 
you are in jeans! 

Mario — Buddy, I miss you bunches! 
Where have you been? Your one and 
only buddy 

Art — Play the field! (Then plant it!) 

Mark Bodine — You're hot! 

Val & Amy - Just deal WITH IT! 



Tony — Did you enjoy Friday night? 

John & Chris — Are you smiling? 

Chris A. — Did you get boo-booed lately? 

Steve Squared — Thanks for the trip to 
N.B.I. - Kelley & Michelle 

Colonel — I'll brown up for you! — Boz 

Darryl — I owe you one! — The chicken 

Sleazestack — We all know where the 
red light district moved to. From what I 
heard Master Fang taught you very well. 
So you acquired a taste for flounder. It's 
your trash now. — Yoda & Luke 

Kevin — Can I please have an extension 
for my best friend? 

D. — All is fair in love and war. 

Sponges — Soak it up. 

Hey, the Toys R Us guys — How's it 
going? 

Ivy — Stop writing your personals in 
class. — Rudy 

To the owner of the blue Dart, get a real 
car! 

We hate BLT's! Tl, T2 

Henry — Twirl your arms, stretch your 
legs and turn a few heads. — K 

Henry — Are we airborne yet? The M 
Girls 

Dr. Carol M.D. - You're deadly with 
the oreos! — Boz 

Red light. BEV! RED LIGHT!! 

2 subs & counting. 

Nice peacock, Kim. 

Nutter-Butter — Sorry about everything, 
you're still my friend, even if I'm not 
yours! Let me know! 

LO, RL, CJ. BR, Laurie - How's life? 

- JP 

Tony — Good luck on Sunday, babe! 
Dina V. — Glow men don't wear make- 
up! Where's the shaft? — Dee 
Andy — I'm glad I came over! 
Chipmunk — Maybe Sleazestack will 
share her fish with you. Get well soon 

- Yoda & Luke 

Kim — Got any wash to do? 

Did you kiss P.H.? 

It was nice while it lasted, wasn't it? 

Maryann — Don't forget to wear some- 
thing to lab next week! — Rudy 

Get a piece of the rock, life insurance, 
call me. — Your agent 

Peachy — Hope he realizes that you're 
the pick of the crop! 

Wanted — Deprived DVC Air Force 
man seeks DVC woman for occasional 
late night company and fun due to con- 
tinue into the morning. Applicants must 
be well endowed and experienced, but 
not over qualified . Respond to the green 
1976 Camaro parked in parking lot on 
weekends. 



HELP WANTED! 

$60 per hundred paid 
for remailing letters from home! 

Send self-addressed, 

stamped envelope for 

information/application to: 

ASSOCIATES 
Box 95-B. Roselle, NJ 07203 



STAFF 

EditorsinChief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor , . . Wendy L. Unger 

Artist Monica Etzweiler 

Reporters Mike Bolles, Missy 

Brangan, Brett Hart, Judy Henry, John 

Nicholson, Melanie O'Neill, Brian 

Taggart, Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry, Anne Shobert. 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 

Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news In the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 



s< 




poRi 




fcV^-Up 



DUTCHMEN ARE 

by John Litzke 

With election time coming this week, 
let us remember the birthdates of former 
presidents Warren G. Harding and James 
"the K doesn't stand for anything" Polk. 
Both presidents were bom on November 
1 which was remembered last Saturday. 
Harding and Polk were quite mediocre 
as far as presidents go, but DVC was far 
from mediocre last Saturday as paced by 
tailback Jimmy Wilson's 123 yards rush- 
ing and three touchdowns to lead the 
Aggies past the hapless Flying Dutchmen 
of Lebanon Valley 33-3. 

The first quarter was a defensive stand- 
off for the most part with neither team 
being able to generate much offense. 
Lebanon Valley would be the first to 
score as, with time running out in the 
third quarter, kicker Brad Rinehimer 
booted a 30-yard field goal and gave 
LVC the 3-0 lead. 

DVC made Lebanon Valley regret 
that they took that early lead because 
LVC would get no more. "Go ahead, 
score again, go ahead, I dare you," said 
DVC. The onslaught began. Quarterback 
Walt Kobryznski, who got the starting 
nod over last week's starter Clay Butter- 
worth, tallied the first DVC touchdown 
on a 20-yard scramble to make it 7-3 
DVC. Jimmy Wilson, the Philadelphia 



SUNK BY WILSON'S THREE TOUCHDOWNS 



* Money-For-College * 

by Irving Bender 

If college is part of the American dream, 
what do you do about the nightmare of 
paying for it? This column offers some 
answers. 

Q. The lack of government aid makes 
financing a professional education a 
heavy and worrisome burden. Where else 
can I turn to? (V.R.. NJ) 

A. First: check with school counselors 
about what aid the school offers for its 
own students. You qualify for private 
sector awards based on many factors in 
your background, including your field of 
interest. There are also awards which ap- 
ply to ALL fields of interest. 

Here is a private source award you are 
eligible for: AYN RAND INSTITUTE 
ESSAY COMPETITION. Awards are: 
$5,000, $2,500 and $1,000. Deadline: 
March 31. Essay topics are assigned an- 
nually. Open to H.S. juniors or seniors 
for study at U.S. or Canadian colleges. 
Write Dr. Michael S. Berliner, Exec. 
Dir., 13101 Washington Blvd., Los 
Angeles, CA 90066. 

How do you know all you are eligible 
for from the private sector? This is an 
enormous chore which can be shortcut 
by a computer service. You can tap into 
the largest database of private source 
listings in the world, topping $8 billion. 
These listings cover UNDERGRADU- 
ATE, GRADUATE and OVERSEAS 
study. For free details, write: Financial 
Aid Finders, 77 Gristmill Rd., Randolph. 
NJ 07869. 



native who has been held to under 100 
yards per game until last Saturday, ran 
rampant through the Lebanon Valley 
defense bolting 31 yards for DVC's sec- 
ond score to make it 14-3 and that's how 
the half ended. 

The halftime stats had DVC leading by 
a slight margin. First downs were 5-3 
DVC, total offense was 127-45 DVC 
(which isn't so slight) and rushing yard- 
age was 1 14-36 DVC. There were a slew 
of punts in the first half as DVC's John 
Sukeena punted eight big times for a 
30.2 average and LVC's Glenn Kaiser 
punted seven big times for a 37.6 aver- 
age, his longest of the game being a 55- 
yard cloud scraper. 

The third quarter would be DVC's 
most productive 25-cent piece as kicker 
John Ford started off the scoring with a 
fine 39-yard field goal that split the 
uprights for a 17-3 lead. Jimmy Wilson 
would add to his productive day with 
touchdown runs of two and four yards 
which gave DVC the commanding and 
practically insurmountable 31-3 lead. In 
the fourth, DVC forced quarterback Chris 
Lucci into his own end zone, Lucci threw 
the ball wildly and was called for inten- 
tional grounding and a safety was tacked 
on to DVC's 31 points. From there on in 
Lebanon Valley said "Uncle" and that 
was it. 



Hats off to the defense once again as 
they held LVC to just 124 yards in total 
offense and interceptions were three in 
number and were snagged down by cor- 
nerbacks Darryl Ellison and Mike Heisy 
and by middle linebacker Jim Hannon. 

Head coach Al Wilson had these post- 
game comments: "We said before the 
game we have to get a win today, we 
had to get something going and then go 
from there. We were sitting a little bit in 
the beginning of the game but once we 
scored those touchdowns we started to 
take it to them. I think we were better 
than they were across the lines and it 
began to show. It has been tough this 
year keeping any kind of continuity. 
We've gotten frustrated sometimes with 
not being able to score, but we were able 
to do some things today." 

The win boosts DVC's record to 3-4-1 
overall and 3-3- 1 in the MAC and Leba- 
non Valley dropped to 2-6. The final two 
games of the 1986 campaign (but they 
just got started it seems) will both be at 
home which is good and they'll be against 
two of the better teams in the MAC this 
year. On Saturday, the Warriors of 
Lycoming will visit for a 1:30 p.m. start 
and next Saturday, DVC will finish vs. 
the Colonels from Wilkes at James Work 
Stadium for a 1:30 p.m. start as well. 



Sports Quiz 

QUESTION *9: 

A pair of young forwards were the 
top two scorers In the ABA in 1 972- 
73. Both left college with eligibility 
remaining in order to turn pro. One 
was Julius Erving of the Virginia 
Squires formerly of the University 
of Massachusetts who scored 31.9 
points per game In 1972-73 to top 
the ABA. Who was runner-up? (Hint: 
He was a teammate of Doc's in the mid- 
dle to late 70's.) 

We have a winner! Congratulations to 
Wayne Lutz who correctly answered the 
question: The Oakland A's won the 
World Series in back to back seasons in 
1973 and 1974. Can you name a starting 
lineup, by position, from their World 
Champion years? 

Wayne's correct answer was: IB Gene 
Tenace; 2B Dick Green; SS Bert Camp- 
anaris; 3B Sal Bando; OF Joe Rudi; OF 
Bill North; OF Reggie Jackson; C Ray 
Fosse; P Vida Blue. 

For his correct answer, Wayne re- 
ceived a coupon for a free burger, fries 
and soda from Caesar's. You could be 
next! Ya gotta play to win! 

EAGLES TICKETS 

Tickets for the Philadelphia Eagles — 
NY. Giants game, November 9 are on 
sale now, in the Dean of Students Office. 
The price is $14. This includes transpor- 
tation by bus, to and from Vet. Stadium. 
Sponsored by the Student Government . 




* Coming Soon * 

RAM PAGES EXCLUSIVE 

MAC BASKETBALL ACTION IS BACK! 
AND DELAWARE VALLEY IS TUNING UP! 

DVC MEN'S AND WOMEN'S BASKETBALL PREVIEW! 
VARSITY AND JUNIOR VARSITY 

STATS, INTERVIEWS, UPDATES AND INFORMATION 

ONLY IN RAM PAGES! 



Athlete of the Week: 

There's not much more you can say 
about our Athlete of the Week. He's ver- 
satile, flexible, he twists and turns and 
jukes, opponents hit him and bounce off 
like a ball against a wall, and he's been 
the all-purpose, workhorse ground gainer 
for the 3-4-1 DVC Aggies. Junior tail- 
back Jimmy Wilson, who, by the end of 
his career here at DVC, could be the all- 
time DVC rusher, rushed for his first 
100 + -yard game of the season last 
Saturday gaining 123 yards on 26 carries 
and scoring three big touchdowns in 
DVC's victory over Lebanon Valley 
33-3. 

Jim hasn't had the year he's capable of 
having but he's leading the team in all 
rushing categories: rushing attempts with 
163, rushing yards with 549, touch- 
downs with four and average yards per 
game with 68.6. 

Jim is a Philadelphia resident and is a 
graduate of Central High School where 
he played football for four years and was 
a member of the Public League all-star 
team in 1984. Not only is Jimmy a finely 
tuned athlete but he is a fine person as 
well. For his hard work and dedication, 
Jimmy Wilson is our Athlete of the 
Week. Congratulations! 




PUMP IT UP: 
Elvis Costello in Philly 

by John Litzke 

The controversial, silent giant from 
Chelsea is one of the initial imports from 
the British punk scene in the early to mid 
70's. Elvis Costello continues to bellow 
out imaginative, emotional, yet radical 
and danceaWe music. 

Elvis played three nights at the Tower 
Theatre in Philadelphia promoting his 
new album "Blood and Chocolate." 
With each night came a more diverse 
and new show. Elvis's first night in Philly 
featured a wheel (of "Wheel of Fortune" 
fame) with his songs embossed on each 
rung of the wheel. Members of the audi- 
ence were called up on stage to spin the 
wheel and wherever the wheel stopped, 
that's what song was played. The second 
night featured a dance floor on stage and 
many members of the audience were up 
dancing. 

But it was the third night that I attend- 
ed in which Elvis reunited with his Attrac- 
tions and played some classic hard-core 
rock 'n roll, which is his trademark (along 
with his specs) . 

Many songs in their first set were un- 
familiar to me but, then again, 1 did rec- 
ognize three or four. He played fabulous 
versions of "Accidents Can Happen" 
and a very moving, intense version of "I 
Want You." During "I Want You," the 
stage lights were shut off and Elvis was in 
the spotlight in his classic pose (knees 
together and guitar in lap) bellowing in 
that classic voice of his. All throughout 
the show his guitar wept with a ferocity I 
had seldom heard before. 

After his first set, he returned for four 
encores in which he played his well- 
known classics like "Angel Gonna Wear 
My Red Shoes" and "Pump It Up." 

I was glad to have finally been ex- 
posed to his music. Unlike the British 
punk movement, which has slacked off 
substantially, Elvis Costello has kept a 
firm grip on the neck of the queen and 
remains a strong force in the British rock 
scene. Keep smiling Elvis. Thank you for 
a fantastic performance. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: Cooler Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

Areo's Best Lunches 1 1 AM-3 PM 

Hoppy Hour 4-6:30 PM 

Rt 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 




Cross Country Update 

CROSS COUNTRY 

BATTLES ALBRIGHT 

It was a hopeful team that traveled 
down to Albright College last Saturday 
for a dual meet against them, but it was a 
depressed team that returned to DVC. 
The cross country team dropped a heart- 
breaker to Albright losing by only five 
points. The final score ended up to be 
30-25. 

Even from the beginning, the odds 
seemed to be stacked against the team. 
Not only did the team have to run on a 
foreign course, but it was also Home- 
coming at Albright and the cheers were 
definitely not for DVC. Yet even with the 
poor odds and the losing attempt, there 
were some bright spots for the team. 

Gerry Kampmeyer was one of these 
bright spots for the team as he seems to 
be improving as each race goes by. Gerry 
was able to pass and hold off an Albright 
runner on the track at the end of the race 
to capture 4th place overall and 2nd man 
for DVC. John Thomson, who has had 
problems with injuries this season, was 
also able to run well. John was able to 
finish 8th overall and 4th for the team . 

Other finishers for DVC were: Steve 
Sports 2nd, Jim Enoch 7th, Tony Dono- 
frio 9th, Tom Await 13th, Sean Miller 
14th, Bill Brosky 15th and Mark Brinsky 
16th. 



• AEROBICS * 

EVERY MONDAY AND 

WEDNESDAY IN ALL-PURPOSE 

ROOM FROM 4:15-5:45 P.M. 

Come, get in shape 
and bring a friend! 

Be prompt! 



DVC GOES WESTERN 
AT PENN STATE 

by M. Brangan 

On October 19, the DVC Western 
Equestrian Team traveled to Belief onte, 
Pennsylvania to the Penn State Western 
Horse Show. Despite the cold weather 
and long ride, the team riders did very 
well. In the afternoon show, DVC won 
reserve hi-point team which hasn't been 
done in two years. Our next show will be 
in the spring with hopefully many of our 
riders qualifying for the regionals. Any- 
one interested in riding please contact 
Mark Yarnish. 

MORNING SHOW 
Advanced — A 

Ted Zajak 4th 

Advanced — B 

Joell Pursel 2nd 

Mark Yarish (capt.) 4th 

Intermediate II - A 

Kris Iandola 3rd 

Lisa Wilkowski 4th 

Intermediate II - B 

Missy Brangan 1st 

Lynda Green 3rd 

Joanne Staats (co-capt.) 4th 

Intermediate I 

Allison Bakos 2nd 

Barbara Kranzle 5th 

Walk-Jog Beginner Stock Seat 

Mark Hartzel 6th 

Rob Mehlman 

AFTERNOON SHOW 
Advanced — A 

Joell Pursel 3rd 

Advanced — B 

Mark Yarish 2nd 

Ted Zajak 5th 

Intermediate II - A 

Joanne Staats 1st 

Kris Iandola 3rd 

Intermediate II - B 

Lisa Wilkowski 1st 

Missy Brangan 4th 

Intermediate I — A 

Lynda Green 2nd 

Allison Bakos 4th 

Intermediate I — B 

Barb Kranzle 2nd 

Walk-Jog Beginner Stock Seat 

Dennis Hines 3rd 

Rob Mehlman 4th 



ORDER YOUR SEATS NOW!! TheSpec,mm 



48 Top Pros • Singles & Doubles • $465,000 Prize Money 

Tournament Champions 
1962-1986 



February 2 - 8, 
1987 



1062 Jon Douglas 

1963 Whitney RMd 

1964 Chuck McKmley 

1965 Charles Pasareli 

1966 Charles Pasareli 

1967 Arthur Ashe 
i960 Manual Sanlana 

1969 Rod Lever 

1970 Rod Lever 

1971 John Newcombe 

1972 Rod Law* 

1973 Stan Smith 



1974 Rod lever 

1975 Marty Riessen 

1976 Jimmy Connors 

1977 Dick Stockton 

1978 Jimmy Connors 

1979 Jimmy Connors 

1960 Jimmy Connors 

1961 Roscoe Tanner 

1962 John McEnroe 

1963 John McEnroe 

1964 John McEnroe 

1985 John McEnroe 

1986 IvanLendl 




ticket men SJ0 00. S1 'SO SI 5 00 

• Gold Patron SMI • S225 (S25 tu dedvctibMl 

• Srtrer Patron ShU • S2O0 

• »«il»bw *gM aeaeion MW only »ND INCL UDES gueet 
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FLEAM SEND ME TICKETS AS FOLLOWS 



OTY 



TOTAl 



Box Seat Information 



OoM Patron Box Seats f> $225 par seat 

IS25 tax deductible) available for the seven day, 

eight day, eight session series ONLY. 

Sections E. F, Q. H. I. R. S, T, U. V, Rows 1-21 

Note: Anyone who wishes to be seated m the first 

five rows (temporary seats) tor the second 

four leeeioni, will be seated m accord wMh 

their selection tor the first four sessions m 

a) First eight row* D, J, 0, W 

b| First five rows C. K, P. X 

Stiver Perron Box Beets 9 S2O0 par seat. 

Available for the seven day. eight session 

series ONLY 

Sections D.J.O.W. Rows 8-21 

Qotd Patron Beet Holders Bonual Receive an 
invitation to attend the January 26 gala preview 
opening of Tennie-in-Art XVI ". 

includes wee* long mambarthip af Ovmliona, the 
Spectrum's pmala dining club AND your nam* 
listed in rha nandsome fotrma/nenl program book 
tor at Box Seat hoktart, 

A limited number of weekend pa c kages are avert- 
able v $140 per seat For information, call the 
Tournament Office, 2 1 5-947 2530 



Spectrum 



February 2-8, 
1987 

D 'Ootd Patron Box Beets 

available @ S225 per seat 
($25 tax deductible) 
Sections E. F. G, H, I, R, 
S, T. U, V 
1-21 for 8 l 
ONLY 



M. ■■ Feb I 

Tuea i ■ | 

Wad Fat 4 

Thunj rat i 

Fn Fat i 

Sat Fas 7 

Set Fes 7. 

Sun 



Midraoht 
Midnqri! 
•mdragnt 
mMrugtit 
M«*vgM 
■M SPM 



♦ J00 



■Silver Patron Box Seats 

available * $200 per sest 
Sections D. J Q. W 
l 8-21 tor 8 session 
I ONLY 

ITICRITS 



10 AM 
10 AM 
10 AM 
10 AM 
3 PM 
1230 I 

7 30 PM Midnight 
Fat S 1 PM 6 PM Fmata 
ProceaamQ Charge 
Tout Endoaad 
Gow Patron Saata t 

S S225 aaci IS2S ta> daducMKe) 
Suvw Parron Saelt a S2O0 each S 
lotai Enooeed 



FOR TICKET INFORMATION CALL 215-947 2930 
(Please print) 

NAME 



OTV 



'920.00 Deals 
Sec ti on s A B. C, K. L, M, 
N O. P. X, Y. Z 
Rows 1-21 
•$17 50 Seats 

5-16.25-36 
1-16 
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1-4, 17-24,37-40 
1-16 

41 80 Rows i -5 
-Subject to availability 



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Encioaa aefl addreaead tfemped envelopa and mail to 

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Ax orders poaimamed ah* Jan ae ** be mm «"d new m you> 
noma at Spectrum ticket window No 6 on day o* performance 
NOPE FUNDS • NO EXCHANGES 

For information call 215-947 2530 




€B€L US. PRO INDOOR 




LITZKE'S 
SPORTS' BRIEFS 

by John Litzke 

• Ex-Phillie shortstop Larry Bowa is now 
a big league manager as the San Diego 
Padres signed Bowa to a one-year con- 
tract at $100,000. Bowa managed the 
San Diego Farm Club Las Vegas Stars, 
and led them to an 80-62 record before 
being called up. Good luck Larry. 

• University of Maryland basketball coach 
Lefty Driesell resigns as head coach 
after 17 years at the helm. A successor 
has yet to be named. 

• In college football action last week it 
was: 

Miami, FL41, Florida St. 23 

Florida 18, Auburn 17 

Penn St. 19, W. Virginia 

N. Carolina 32, Maryland 30 

Ohio St. 31, Iowa 10 

Michigan 69, Illinois 13 

Nebraska 38, Kansas St. 

Oklahoma 64, Kansas 3 

Texas A&M 39, SMU 35 

Syracuse 24, Pitt 20 

Arkansas 45, Rice 14 

Mississippi 21, LSU 19 

UCLA 49. Oregon St. 

Fordham 55, Iona 7 

Claremount-Mudd 53, Pomona-Pitzer 

• In college football games of interest last 
week it was: This first score needs an 
introduction: Edinboro halfback Floyd 
Faulkner ran for 206 yards and three 
touchdowns on only eight carries as 
Edinboro knocked off visiting Ship- 
pensburg, ready. 66-53. Shippens- 
burg's 53 points set a NCAA Division II 
record for most points scored by a los- 
ing team. All in all. 17 touchdowns 
were scored, Edinboro had a whopping 
606 yards in total offense and Ship- 
pensburg had 487. During the post 
game, both defensive coordinators 
were tied, beaten and run over repeat- 
edly by the Shippensburg bus. 
Wilkes 24. Widener 15 ■ 
Lycoming 63. Juniata 27 
Susquehanna 25. Upsala 
Rutgers 41. Louisville 

Villanova 42. Columbia 34 
Hampden-Sydney 24, Gettysburg 14 
Moravian 28, Albright 7 
Delaware St. 34. S. Carolina St. 21 
W. Chester 62, Mansfield 20 
Muhlenberg 24. Ursinus 18 

• The baseball free agent front is headed 
by the likes of Jack Morris, Andre 
Dawson, Tim Raines, Ted Simmons, 
Steve Carlton. Bob Homer, Ray Knight. 
Graig Nettles. Dave Kingman, Ron 
Guidry, Robin Yount, Lonnie Smith, 
Lance Parrish, Keith Moreland, Reggie 
Jackson, Doug Decinces, Tony Armas 
and Rich Gedman. Happy shopping! 

• U.S. to send team of all-stars to face 
the Japanese in Japan. Team will be 
managed by Davey Johnson of the 
World Champion Mets and on the 
team will be— Catchers: Rich Gedman, 
Boston; Tony Pena, Pittsburgh. Pitch- 
ers: John Franco, Cincinnati; Greg 
Hanis, Texas; Willie Hernandez, De- 
troit: Ted Higuera, Milwaukee; Jack 
Moms, Detroit; Jeff Reardon, Montreal; 
Mike Scott, Houston; Mike Witt, Cali- 
fornia. Infielders: Buddy Bell, Cincin- 
nati; Wally Joyner, California; Cal Rip- 
ken, Baltimore; Glenn Davis, Houston; 
Brook Jacoby. Cleveland; Ryne Sand- 
berg, Chicago; Ozzie Smith, St. Louis; 
Frank White, Kansas City. Outfielders: 
Jesse Barfield. Toronto; Von Hayes. 
Philadelphia; Jose Canseco, Oakland: 



Tony Gwynn, San Diego; Dale Murphy, 
Atlanta. U.S. team is currently 2-0 
against Japanese on their seven -game 
tour. 

• Soviet National Basketball Team be- 
gins its American Tour. The Russians 
will play all-star teams from the CBA. 
Soviets won their first matchup 77-72. 
Soviets were led by Vladimir Tkachenko 
and Sharunas Marchulenis each with 
18 points. Calvin Natt had 16 and 
Cozell McQueen added a team high 
27 for the Americans. 

• In high school action this past week 
and weekend it was: 

Frankford 33, Lincoln 16 
Bartram 6, W. Philadelphia 
Roxborough 0, Germantown 
Franklin 14, Southern 14 
Central 42, Dobbins 14 
University 26, Overbrook 6 
Martin Luther King 12, Olney 6 
Gratz 14, Bok 8 
Washington 20, Northeast 
Bishop Egan 21, N. Catholic 12 
Arch. Wood 14, Bishop Kenrick 7 
Methacton 45, Cheltenham 6 
L. Moreland 20, Springfield 14 
Council Rock 42, Bensalem 13 
Truman 20, Pennsbury 9 
Abington 18, C.B East 6 
Academy Park 29, Penn Wood 20 
Boyertown 14, Great Valley 10 
Owen J. Roberts 13, W.C. East 10 
Lansdale Catholic 27, St. Pius X 21 
Plymouth- Whitemarsh 17, U. Merion 7 
Quakertown 24, Souderton 20 
Hatboro-Horsham 20, Wissahickon 7 
U. Dublin 21, U. Moreland 7 . 
Neshaminy 20. William Tennent 12 
North Penn 24. Pennridge 7 
C.B. West 27. Norristown 13 
Arch. Ryan 37, LaSalie 6 
Bishop McDevitt 14, Card. Dougherty 6 
St. John Neumann 13. Roman Cath. 
St. James 22, St. Joseph's 15 
Arch. Carroll 31, Card. O'Hara 24 
W Catholic 0, Msgr. Bonner 

• As of Monday, Sixers are 500 at 1-1 
after winning opener 108-104 and los- 
ing to Atlanta Sunday night 122-113 
behind Dominique's 36. Sixers faced 
Indiana, Milwaukee, San Antonio to- 
night, and Portland tomorrow. Boston 
is .500 at 1-1 as well. The huge story 
surrounds the air Walker as Jordan hit 
for 50 points against the Knicks last 
Saturday and hit for 41 vs. Cleveland 
Sunday. Atlanta remains undefeated 
at 2-0 as does Seattle. 

• In NFL action last Sunday it was: 
Washington 44, Minnesota 38 in OT 
St. Louis 13. Philadelphia 10 
Denver 21. LA. Raiders 7 

N.Y. Jets 38. Seattle 7 

Pittsburgh 27. Green Bay 3 

Miami 28, Houston 7 

New Orleans 23. San Francisco 10 

Cleveland 24. Indianapolis 9 

Cincinnati 24. Detroit 17 

Tampa Bay 34, Buffalo 28 

New England 25, Atlanta 17 

Kansas City 24, San Diego 23 

Mon. nite: LA. Rams 20, Chicago 17 

• Sunday it will be: 

N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia 
Chicago at Tampa Bay 
Cincinnati at Houston 
LA. Rams at New Orleans 
New England at Indianapolis 
N.Y. Jets at Atlanta 
Pittsburgh at Buffalo 
Seattle at Kansas City 
Washington at Green Bay 
LA. Raiders at Dallas 
St. Louis at San Francisco 
San Diego at Denver 
Mon. nite: Miami at Cleveland 

• In the New York City Marathon last 
Saturday. Gianni Poli of Italy was 
crowned the winner after his spectacu- 
lar finish of 2 hours. 1 1 minutes and 6 
seconds. Norway's Grete Waitz led the 
women's division across the finish line 
with a time of 2 hours. 28 minutes and 
6 seconds. 





NOTICE The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



Vol. XXI, No. 11 

Friday, November 14, 1986 



All the news 
that fits, 
we print! 




College to Sponsor 
13th Annual Turkey Trot 

Delaware Valley College will host the 
13th Annual Turkey Trot Race on Sun- 
day. November 23rd. Starting time is 2 
p.m. 

Turkeys donated by Gross Gourmet 
Foods will be awarded to the first two 
male and first two female finishers. Special 
awards will also be given to the next 13 
male and eight female finishers. Medals 
will also be awarded to the top three male 
finishers in nine different age categories 
and top three females finishers in six dif- 
ferent age categories. 

There will also be team awards, with 
scoring based on the overall place finish 
of the first five team members. Team scor- 
ing cards will be picked up the day of the 
race. A team trophy and five individual 
medals will be given to the first high school 
team and the first open team. 

Entry fee for the race is $3.00. Post 
entry on the day of the race is $4.00 
Check in and post entries is scheduled 
between 12:30 p.m. and 1:45 p.m Maps 
of the course are available from the Dela- 
ware Valley College Athletic Office during 
regular business hours (Monday through 
Friday. 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.). 

The men's record for the 3.5 mile 
course is 16:04 set by Delaware Valley 
College graduate Jim Parsons in 1984. 
The women's record of 19: 17 was set by 
Jeanne Cranney. another alumnus, in 
1982. 

For more information about the race, 
runners can contact Dr. Robert Berthold. 
cross country coach, by calling: 
(215) 345-1500. 



PLACEMENT OFFICE 

INTERVIEWS FOR THE 

WEEK OF NOVEMBER 17 

Thursday, November 20 

CHEMLAWN 

Individual interviews 9-4 p.m. 

SMITH KLINE FRENCH LABS 
Small animal internship January 
-July 1987 for sophomores & 
juniors 

Also a one year full-time temporary 
position for graduating seniors 

SIGN-UP IN THE PLACEMENT 
OFFICE FOR ALL INTERVIEWS. 



J 



WE WANT 
YOUR OPINION 

Joshua Feldstein, Delaware Valley 
College's current president is to retire as 
president this June. You may have read 
about the Presidential Search Committee 
(comprised of student government offi- 
cials, faculty, alumni and college trustees) 
which is looking across the nation for the 
person who will best fill this position. The 
searchers have asked you already — 
now tell Ram Pages — what do YOU 
think those qualities are one should look 
for in a candidate for this highly impor- 
tant position? Drop your thoughts pertain- 
ing to this decision in P.O. Box 988 by 
Monday, November 24th. 

The Ram Pages staff has compiled a 
few suggestions to stir your ideas. We 
want a keen business sense, someone ex- 
perienced as an administrator who is cap- 
able of dealing with out school's special 
needs. This next president must certainly 
not be afraid of new challenges where 
warranted. A former president or execu- 
tive of an established concern, be it 
business or educational business, could 
fill the bill. 

This decision could be one of the most, 
if not the most, important decisions af- 
fecting this college in years, affecting 
those of us soon to become alumni, as 
well as students and faculty returning 
next fall. 



Prepare to meet 
"The Ultimate Challenger 

November 18, 1986 
12-5 p.m. • All-Purpose Room 

OUR GOAL IS 150 PINTS 
Blood Donation sign-up sheets 
are available in every dorm. 



Are the Women of DVC 
Braver than the Men? 

In October 1985 the American Red 
Cross came to Delaware Valley College 
where many students were willing to give 
of themselves (V2 pint of blood to be exact) 
to help others who were in need. After 
the blood drive ended and the respective 
dorm totals were added up, I was shocked 
to see that a female dormitory had more 
donors than any of the male dormitories. 

No offense ladies, but I just spent the 
past two summers with the United States 
Marines Corps and this wimpery that 1 see 
displayed by my male colleagues just 
doesn't make it in my book. I've noticed 
that we have a lot of tough talking, hard 
drinking little boys on campus, but when 
the chips are down, they can't even mus- 
ter up the gonads to give a little blood 
that may just save someone's life! Just 
who wears the pants at this school any- 
way? 

Therefore gentlemen, if you want to 
prove to the women of this college just 
how many "real men" there are here at 
DVC, why not do it by donating blood 
this Tuesday in the All Purpose Room of 
the Student Center. See you there. 



Out From Under 
The Editors' Desk: 

Dear Readers, 

Your newspaper still needs a few good 
writers and photographers. Our most re- 
cent issue, No. 10, November 7, is evi- 
dence of our dilemma. We have been 
"running on empty," save an oversize 
Sports Wrap-up — the work of expert 
John Litzke — and almost too many ad- 
ditions to the Personals column. If con- 
tributors to the Personals column would 
channel their efforts into an article or two 
per week, Ram Pages would be more 
than grateful! 

As we have reported to you before Ram 
Pages cannot rely solely on whatever 
press releases may come our way before 
the Monday night deadline. The news- 
paper at Delaware Valley College should 
reflect the people and events of itself in a 
well-rounded manner. All majors and 
every person on this campus, is fair ma- 
terial for Ram Pages. 

Therefore, if you like to take pictures, 
stop by Ram Pages' office each week and 
drop off some shots of campus events, 
places and people. Even if you happen 
to have a shot of a club outing, or a group 
of students or faculty or staff members 
being honored, why not let the entire 
college join in by sending your newspaper 
a print with the names and reasons for 
your picture; we'll even return pictures to 
you after printing! 

If you cannot make our 7 to 10 p.m. 
Monday night meetings, drop us a note 
via P O. Box 988 or call us Monday nights 
at ext. 2259. 

Thanks for your support. 
Bill Rein 
John D. Ebert 



Students Take Action 

by Judy Henry 

On Monday, November 10, the Food 
Committee held an opening meeting, to 
discuss how the cafeteria could be im- 
proved. Students, who had voiced com- 
plaints among themselves, decided to 
back up their words with action, by unit- 
ing this session. Close to thirty people at- 
tended, in an attempt to make the meal 
plan more malleable to students' needs. 

A petition was circulated a short while 
ago in which over 400 students signed in 
agreement that the cafeteria needed im- 
provement. That was a first step. In order 
to receive this improvement, persistence 
will be key. We need your suggestions 
and support to make this effort a success. 

The Food Committee will have a follow- 
up meeting in the near future. Exact dates 
will be posted in Ram Pages and around 
campus. Please voice your suggestions 
in written form and send them to P.O. 
Box 620 or 631. Please sign your name 
so they will be taken seriously. 

If you want a change, you must address 
the problem, and then take action against 
it. 

Thank you for the support you've 
shown. 



Peer Counselors 

The Counseling Department would like 
to extend a giant "Thank You" to all of 
our Peer Counselors for your enthusiasm 
and dedication in doing an outstanding 
job in the first semester. 

The function of a Peer Counselor is to 
get together with freshmen on a group or 
individual basis and help the freshmen 
"avoid some of the mistakes we made as 
freshmen," as one of the Peer Counselors 
put it. 

The Peer Counselors share their experi- 
ences on just about everything. Topics 
range from boyfriend/girlfriend and room- 
mate relationships to weekend activities 
and how to handle specific classes and 
profs. 

Our thanks go out to: 

Gary Apgar, '89 Leo Reaver, '89 

John Boyd. '87 Carl Schucharot, '88 

Jodi Brough , '87 Christine Schuhz, '88 

Greg Christiansen , '88 Barbara Schwarz, '88 

Ray Delaney. '89 Robert Solly. '89 

William DeMarco , '89 John Stierty , '89 

Rick Dietrick, '88 Joanna Toenniessen, '87 

Betsy Hague, '87 Wendy Ungea, '88 

Doug Hamann , '89 David Welsh, '87 

David Handler, '87 Anna Marie Whitesell, '88 

David Hirtle, '88 Jim Whitfield, '87 

Lisa Kardane , '88 Gerhard Wubbeis, '88 

DougKauffman, '87 Carmen Zaffavano, '89 

Joe Marano, '88 Greg Strait, '89 

If you are a freshman and you have 

not met with your Peer Counselor, then 

that's freshmen mistake *1. However, 

with the freshmen attrition rate being 

almost 50%, you may not get a chance 

to make mistake *2. Talk with your Peer 

Counselor. They care! 




This Week on 
Campus 

by Wendy L. Unger 
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14 

Movies at Caesar*! Pub, 8 p.m 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER IS 

Football (H) vs. Wilkes, 1:30 p 
Friends of Football Dinner 
APR 4:30 to 9:00 p.m, 

SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 14 

39 days urrtfl Christmas! 

MONDAY. NOVEMBER 17 

Cheer up Sam) 
TUESDAY. NOVEMBER IS 

Blood Mobile - APR, 12-6 p.m 

Come out and gtve* 

WBB (H), Frankftn & Marshal 

scrimmage, 7 p.m. 

Movie: "Somewhere In Time" 9 p 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER It 

Square Dance; 

Rudtey-Newman Gym, 8 p.m. 
Faculty Development Committee 
Lecture, APR 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20 

Caesar's Vacation Pub* 9 p.m 




LOST & FOUND 1986 

3 watches 

3 pair of glasses 

jewelry 

1 roll of film 
records 

several types of keys 

3 books 

1 umbrella 

gloves and mittens 

2 backpacks 
1 gym bag 

1 jacket 
1 1986 Gleaner 
1 scarf 
If you can identify one or more of 
these items, contact Dean of Students of- 
fice, 2nd floor. Student Center. You 
must be able to identify items. 

First Open House 
GREAT SUCCESS 

The College's first Admissions Open 
House brought nearly 300 high school 
seniors and their parents to our campus 
on a mild fall Saturday, October 25. 

New admissions director, Steve Zenko 
anticipates an even greater response to 
the next Open House, planned for Fe- 
bruary 7, 1987. Again, invitations will be 
offered to any high school seniors. If you 
know of a college-bound student who 
may be interested in attending the Febru- 
ary event, let admissions know. 



THE WINNER IS . . . 

The winner of the Hillel basket of cheer 
raffle was M. Guidos of Penndel. Pa. 
Thanks to all the contributors — stay tuned 
for our scholarship auction November 22 



From the Library . . . 

A helpful hint from the library: 

When you borrow a book, be sure to 
check the date due stamped on the blue 
card in the pocket. If you want to keep 
the book beyond the due date, it is usually 
possible to renew it. Just bring the book 
back to the Circulation Desk and ask to 
have it renewed or call extension 2255. 

ATTENTION STUDENTS 
AND GRADUATES 

Would you be interested in starting a 
career which offers tremendous growth 
potential from within the company to 
management? First year salaries offered 
to $16,000, with full company benefits 
including: life and medical insurance, paid 
holidays and vacations and 40 IK savings 
plan. I cordially invite all Freshmen up to 
graduates to call for a personal interview. 
Contact: Mr. Strike at 364-5700 from 8 
to 5 daily at Ever-Green Lawns. 



Positive Response Received 
From Lecturer 

The following is excerpted from a letter 
to Mary Palumbo from Alfred McFee, 
the recent lecturer to our campus under 
sponsorship of the Faculty Development 
Committee: 

"I have done a number of these lec- 
tures over a few years and honestly 
have never had one which I enjoyed 
more or felt was more worthwhile. The 
large turnout and obvious enthusiasm 
of the audience attests to the fact that 
your staff not only did a good job of 
advertising, but are also very success- 
ful at student motivation. I could not 
have asked for more delightful accom- 
modations or any better reception by 
and visit with your staff. Please convey 
my thanks to everyone there for their 
hospitality and especially to Alice, Jim 
and Craig for their time." 

Library Hours 
November 1986 



Tuesday, Nov. 25 
Wednesday. Nov. 26 
Thursday, Nov. 27 
Friday. Nov. 28 
Saturday. Nov. 29 
Sunday. Nov. 30 
Monday. Dec 1 



8:30-4:30 

8:30-4:30 

CLOSED 

CLOSED 

CLOSED 

CLOSED 

8:3011:00 

Regular Hours 



Term Papers? 

Writing a term paper? Polishing up a 
resume? If you haven't already discovered 
them, you'll be glad to hear that the Libra- 
ry has two Apple lie computers and word 
processing software available for student 
use. Call extension 2253 to reserve time 
of the computer. 

How to Pass 
Your Finals 

If you have any interest at all in passing 
your finals (for freshmen, your first are 
your most important) , then the Tutoring 
Center has something for you . 
A 3-Day Workshop on how to prepare 
for and take final exams will be presented 
by Mr. Steve Davis. Coordinator of Stu- 
dent Counseling at DVC. You will receive 
selected topics from a 15 lesson $200.00 
course that will be FREE for all DVC stu- 
dents. The course will be offered Wednes- 
day, third period (11:20 a.m. to 12:10 
p.m.), November 19th. December 3rd. 
(November 26th is Thanksgiving vaca 
tion).and December 10th. (Finals start 
December 12th.) 

If you have any questions concerning 
the workshop please stop down to the 
tutoring center (Siegal Hall basement) or 
call ext. 2309. 



ATTENTION STUDENTS... 

Job Experience to Complement Your Education 

If you <irc seeking part-time, full-time or live-in employ- 
ment in the human services field. PAI invites you to begin 
your professional career working with people who have a 
mental or physical handicap and need YOU. 



PAI WANTS: 

• people who are caring and 
enthusiastic 

• people who can use their 
education or life ex- 
perience to build a career 

• people who respect the 
rights of others with 
disabilities 



PAI OFFERS YOU: 

• training and continuing 
education 

• challenging, rewarding 
experience 

• flexible schedule— full- 
time, part-time, live-in 

• professional career ad- 
vancement opportunities 

• a chance to share yourself 
with others 

• excellent fringe benefits 

PAI WANTS YOU... 

If you want professional growth while you share your life 
with those who need you most. 

Gain the valuable experience PAI can give you by calling 
(215) 822-6417 for your application or by sending your 
resume to: 




Prospectus Associates, IncT" 

Twin Park Industrial Center • 3151 Advance Lane 
Colmar. PA 18915 • (215) 822-6417 



DVC Accounting Majors 
Awarded at Dinner 

Three DVC students were awarded at 
the annual dinner of the Pennsylvania In- 
stitute of Certified Public Accountants 
(P.I.C.P.A.), Philadelphia Chapter for 
Relations with Colleges and Universities. 
Held October 28 at Williamson's on the 
top of the GSB building, City Line Ave- 
nue, DVC students Chris Boyle, Gayle 
Siegert and Mike Simone were among 
those college students given awards. Also 
attending were DVC faculty business 
teachers Barbara Kieffer and Maureen 
Mihalko. 

— Lecture — 

Wednesday, November 19, 1986 

JOHN D. CAPUTO, Ph.D. 

Department of Philosophy, 
Villanova University 

A Philosopher Looks at 
Technological Culture 

What perspective can a humanist bring 
to bear on the extraordinary expansion 
of technology in our age? What has this 
revolution done to our understanding of 
the human self, of art. of truth, of the 
traditional meaning of humanities? What 
is the difference between modern tech- 
nology and classical craftsmanship? 

Support provided by the Pennsylvania 
Humanities Council. 

Holiday Vacation Closings 

In observance of Thanksgiving, college 
offices will close at 4:30 p.m. on Wednes- 
day. November 26 and reopen at 8:30 
a.m. Monday, December 1. 

College offices will be closed on 
Wednesday. December 24, Thursday. 
December 25 and Friday. December 26. 
Offices will reopen at 8:30 a.m. on Mon- 
day, December 29. 

College offices will also close at 1:00 
p.m. on Wednesday, December 31 and 
will reopen at 8:30 a.m. on Friday. Jan- 
uary 2. 

CLUB NEWS 

Landscape-Nursery News 

Thinking of graduating into your own 
landscaping company? Doug Kale of 
Princeton. N.J.'s Kales's Nursery, will be 
at DVC to speak on starting a landscaping 
business this Monday, November 17, at 
7 p.m. in the Coffeehouse. 

Mr. Kale will follow his talk with slides 
illustrating landscape construction prob- 
lems and how he overcame them. 

All are invited to attend, free of any 
charge! 



Personals 



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NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: Cooler Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

Areo's Best Lunches 1 1 AM 3 PM 

Hoppy Hour 4-6 30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



Due to the overwhelming response to 
the Personals column, it has become eco- 
nomically unfeasible to publish Personals 
on a free basis. In order to continue this 
fun and interesting form of communica- 
tion, we are forced to charge 10C per per- 
sonal. Personal forms can now be found 
in the Post Office and in the cafeteria. 
Thank you for your cooperation. 

Karen Vincent, Michelle Dobbs, Regina 
Lynam, Carol Janovsky, Scott Hollinger, 
Lori Ortiz, Richard Nazareta and Laurie 
Middour - The GREAT PUMPKIN 
knows you stole it's progeny. CONFESS! 
Charlie Brown, Snoopy and Linus. 
Mike F. (AMF) — A party with you is 
never boring! By now your week is up so 
you don't have to be nice anymore. 
Thank God because I couldn't handle 
that anymore. Whatever you do just 
remember sleep isn't a necessity but 
reading Reader's Digest and walking the 
dog is. Me 

Rudy — How goes the fishing? Nol 
much longer and you won't have to put 
up with the fish anymore. Oh no, now it 
will be one against one. Do you think I 
can handle it? My roommate will protect 
me. Us 

Yoda — Had any good slime lately? You 
were so busy with the shaving cream that 
you forgot to protect your sneakers. Put 
them in the stream I'm sure your fish will 
clean them. Sleezestack 

Hel — One week and you missed your 
chance. How about we just get you a 
one-way ticket to wherever you want to 
go. (I mean wherever he is ) Sleezstack 

Ivy — Cracked your knee into any beds 
lately? Just forget them all. they all have 
an attitude problem. Who wants to be 
their friends when they treat you like an 
enemy? Sleezestack 

Trish Dollarton — Why is it every time a 
student enforces school policy they get 
ridiculed for it Face it. you were wrong. I 
was right and now you feel you hr v+> to 
get back. It doesn't make sense to me 
PS. The only stars I'll ever see are the 
orres in the sky and on TV. 

Your Astro Buddv 

Seymour — I was picking up a pizza at 

Amore's and I heard this conversation 

about buttwhating? And he did what? A 

new what hole? 

R.M. — Heard any raindrops on your 

window lately? 

Wilbert — Love that new hairstyle, what 

did it take to get it that way? Only five 

stitches! Amazing. 

C.C. — Are you still concentrating? 

B.C. — Find any good notes on your 

pillow lately? 



WORDS UNLIMITED 

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Resumes. Cover Letters. Mailings, 
Term Papers, Thesis. Dissertations 

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STAFF 

F.ditors in Chief -John D Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports h.ditor -John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . Wendy L. Unger 
Artist Monica Etzweiler 

Reporters Mike Bolles. Missv, 

Brangan. Brett Hart. Judy Henry. John 

Nicholson. Melanie O'Neill. Brian 

Tayyart. Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry. Anne Shobert. 

Mr Edward O'Brien. 

Dr Richard Ziemer 

See news in the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 




poRi 




^jia^-Cp 




Vicki (11) shown here in some 1986 footage 
getting up for a return 

Athlete of the Week: 

Let's not leave volleyball yet without 
saluting one of the most productive players 
on Coach Fox's team. Senior setter. Vicki 
Keener has been a virtuoso at setter for 
the past four seasons and helped lead 
the lady's volleyball team to their 1986 
record of 7-10. 

Vicki is a biology major from California 
Area High School and lives in California. 
Pa. and she'll be a member of Coach 
Gary Pento's basketball team this winter. 
For her setting, hard work and dedica- 
tion. Vicki Keener is our Athlete of the 
Week. 



• AEROBICS * 

EVERY MONDAY AND 

WEDNESDAY IN ALL-PURPOSE 

ROOM FROM 4:15-5:45 P.M. 

Come, get in shape 
and bring a friend! 

Be prompt! 




LYCOMING WINS FIFTH STRAIGHT 
AS DELAWARE VALLEY FALTERS, 30-7 



Heber. Shaffer. Voell engulf LV quarterback 
Tomorrow is Chuck. Tom and all the seniors 
day to pounce, hit and hold 

"Dr. Livingston I presume" is a most 
appropriate way to begin this commen- 
tary. Back on November 8, 1871, adven- 
turer Mr. Stanley, after many, many 
months of searching in the deepest, dark- 
est jungles of Africa for his beloved col- 
league found him and threw that most 
appropos line at the one and only Dr. 
Stanley Livingstone. And then. 1 15 years 
later. Delaware Valley College played a 
football game against quite a tough oppo- 
nent The weather didn't cooperate and 
the field and general playing conditions 
reminded one of a jungle or swamp. But 
the weather didn't seem to bother the 
visiting Warriors of Lycoming as they 
racked up 30 big points on the always 
tough Aggie defense enroute to a 30-7 
victory. 

Unlike Mr. Stanley finding Dr. Living- 
stone, the Aggies have yet to find their 
offense DVC totaled 140 yards in total 
offense (81 rushing and 59 passing) while 
the Warriors collected 345 yards in total 
offense. The Warriors. 10th ranked in 
the Lambert Poll (poll for small eastern 
college football teams) . controlled the play 
the entire way. 



Lycoming struck first midway through 
the first quarter when junior tight end 
James O'MaOey (114 yards on four recep- 
tions for the day) was on the receiving 
end of a 53-yard touchdown pass from 
senior quarterback Larry Barretta, out of 
St. John Neumann in Philadelphia, and 
the Rusty Fricke kick gave the Warriors 
the early 7-0 edge. Then with time run- 
ning out in the second quarter, Lycoming 
drove down the field and capped their 
drive off with a 30-yard field goal by 
kicker Rusty Fricke, a senior out of Mea- 
dowbrook High and MAC leader in kick- 
ing points with 39, to make it 10-0. On 
the following DVC possession, a costly 
turnover resulted and two plays and five 
yards later O'Malley pulled in his second 
touchdown pass of the day from a strike 
by Barretta with just 1:33 to go until the 
half to give Lyco' the 17-0 cushion at half- 
time. * 

In second half action, running back Ron 
Rosati, a junior from St. John Neumann 
of Philadelphia, capped a six-play, 70- 
yard drive with a three-yard touchdown 
burst and the missed extra point made it 




Kicker John Ford hits a 30 yarder vs Lebanon 
Valley He didn't get a shot Saturday 



23-0. Rosati and Barretta would hook up 
for the final score of the day on a 13-yard 
pass play at 12:26 of the fourth quarter 
that finished a six -play, 80-yard drive 
with the big play being a 52-yard pass 
play from Barretta to senior wide receiver 
Rich Kessler out of William Tennent. 

Then, late in the fourth quarter, run- 
ning back Jim Wilson took the handoff 
from senior quarterback "Walt Kobryznski 
and on the halfback option. Jim passed 
the pigskin into the awaiting arms of Jon 
Wilson (three catches, 36 yards) for the 
17-yard score which ended a two-play, 
19-yard drive. The big play which set up 
the touchdown was an interception by line- 
man John Shaffer deep in Lycoming ter- 
ritory. And that's how it ended. 

The win puts Lycoming at 6-2, tied 
with Juniata for second place in the MAC 
with Susquehanna leading the division 
with an undefeated 8-0 record . The loss 
drops DVC to 3-4- 1 in the MAC and 3-54 
overall. The finale will be played next 
week when the Colonels from Wilkes 
College visit DVC for a 1 :30 start. Finish- 
ing out their season and their college foot- 
ball career next week will be a host of 
seniors who deserve a round of applause. 
Congratulations to fullback Joe Bello, 
center Brian Clapp. defensive back Steve 
Clark, tackle Mark Butcher, linebacker 
Greg Currie, running back Tim Goll, mid- 
dle linebacker Jim Hannon, lineman Joe 
Harby, defensive back Mike Heisy, de- 
fensive lineman Chuck Heiber, quarter- 
back Walt Kobryznski. running back Tom 
Lewandowski, lineman Jesse Perkins, 
tight end Chris Snyder, defensive lineman 
Tom Voell, defensive back Mike Williams 
and receiver Jon Wilson. Best of luck on 
your day to shine. 



ORDER YOUR SEATS NOW!! SZWJ 

48 Top Pros . Singles & Doubles* $465,000 Prize Money 1987 

ToufiMMnent CiMntptons 
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1999 Manual Samara 
1989 tod Law 

1970 todlavar 

1971 Jot 

1972 Pod Lever 

1973 Stan Smith 



1974 Rod Lav* 

1975 Marty I 
1974 Jimmy Connor* 
1977 Dick Stockton 
1979 Jimmy Connor* 
1979 Jimmy Connor* 

1990 Jimmy Connor* 

1991 Boaco* Tanner 

1992 John faJcEnroe 

1993 JohnMcEnroa 

1994 JohnMcEnroa 
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February 2-8, 
1967 



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MAC BASKETB/VLL ACTION IS BACK! 
AND DELAWARE VALLEY IS TUNING UP! 

DVC MEN'S AND WOMEN'S BASKETBALL PREVIEW! 
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LITZKE'S 
SPORTS' BRIEFS 

by John Litzke 

• Hagler-Leonard fight is set for April 6 
and may be the richest fight ever! 

• Boston will not renew the contracts of 
Tom Seaver and Tony Armas for the 
1987 season. 

• Ruland and Barkley fall to injuries this 
week. Ruland with a very bad knee and 
Barkley with a bruised spleen received 
in a game last week against Indiana. He 
should be back after the west coast road 
swing and Ruland's status is unknown. 
Sixers remain in second place, V2 game 
behind Boston as of last Sunday. The 
rest of the division has New Jersey, New 
York and Washington all with one win 
in five tries. Injuries plaguing the entire 
NBA as the season just gets underway. 

• Flyers' goalie Bob Froese is very unhap- 
py with the severe lack of playing time 
he is receiving so he demands a trade 
and Philly will try to accommodate 
him. Look for Froese to go to either 
L.A. or Winnipeg. Flyers are atop 
Patrick Division with one point lead 
over Pittsburgh and six point lead over 
third place N.Y. Islanders. Flyers 
played Detroit Thursday, play the New 
York Rangers tonight on channel 57 
and play Washington Sunday night on 
Prism. 

• In pro football last Sunday it was: 
Chicago 23, Tampa Bay 3 

N.Y. Giants 17, Philadelphia 14 
San Diego 9, Denver 3 
New Orleans 6, L.A. Rams 
Houston 32, Cincinnati 28 
L.A. Raider 17, Dallas 13 
Washington 16, Green Bay 7 
San Fransisco 43, St. Louis 17 
Minnesota 24, Detroit 10 
New England 30, Indianapolis 21 
N.Y. Jets 28. Atlanta 14 
Buffalo 16, Pittsburgh 12 
Kansas City 27, Seattle 7 
Monday night it was: 
Cleveland 26. Miami 16 



• This Sunday, week 1 1 of the NFL 
season it will be: 

Detroit at Philadelphia 
Chicago at Atlanta 
Houston at Pittsburgh 
Miami at Buffalo 
N.Y. Giants at Minnesota 
New Orleans at St. Louis 
Seattle at Cincinnati 
Tampa Bay at Green Bay 
New England at L.A. Rams 
Kansas City at Denver 
Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets 
Dallas at San Diego 
Cleveland at L.A. Raider 
Monday night it will be: 
San Fransisco at Washington 

• Houston Astors manager Hal Lanier 
was named National League manager 
of the year. Meanwhile in the American 
League, Boston manager John McNa- 
mara was named American League 
manager of the year after leading his 
Boston Red Sox into the World Series 
and to a regular season record. In other 
baseball news this week Tony Pena, 
Jesse Barfield and Glenn Davis hit 
home runs to lead the United States All- 
Star team to a 9-4 victory over a team 
of Japanese All-Stars in Tokyo. Davey 
Johnson's team finished the tour with a 
6-1 record. Barfield's homer tied him 
with Von Hayes of the Phillies for the 
final American team leaders in home 
runs with four. Tony Pena was named 
MVP and Pittsburgh pitcher Rick Rho- 
den won the final game of the tour. 

• Eagles release tackle Tom Jelesky and 
have lost the services of quarterback 
Ron Jaworski for the rest of the season 
with a severe injury to a finger on his 
throwing hand. Randall Cunningham 
steps in. Why wasn't Randall in from 
the start? This should be Jaworski's last 
season!? 

• Portland center Sam Bowie, out of 
University of Kentucky, may miss the 
rest of the 1986-87 season following 
an overtime win over Dallas in which 
he fractured his right shin bone. 

• Mets' pitcher Dwight Gooden is nego- 
tiating a new contract that would pay 
the 21 year old pitcher . . . $1.32 milli- 
on dollars. And I'm still in college mak- 
ing the minimum wage. 

• Former Maryland University basketball 
coach is giving serious thought to coach- 
ing in the NBA. More later 

• In major college football action this past 
Saturday it was: 

Penn State 17, Pitt 15 
Miami 37, Pitt 10 
Arizona St. 49, California 
Michigan 31, Purdue 7 



Nebraska 35, Iowa St. 14 
Oklahoma 77, Missouri 
Illinois 20, Iowa 16 
Boston College 38, Temple 29 
Penn 42, Lafayette 14 
Auburn 52, Cincinnati 7 
Stanford 28, UCLA 23 
Florida 31, Georgia 19 
Baylor 29, Arkansas 14 
Clemson 38, North Carolina 10 
Ohio St. 30, Northwestern 9 
Florida St. 45, South Carolina 28 
Notre Dame 62, SMU 29 
Texas 30, Houston 10 
Furman 59, Davidson 
Troy St. 50, Tenn-Martin 30 

• In college football games of interest it 
was: 

Widener 13, Albright 10 
N. Carolina A&T 20, Del. St. 17 
Susquehanna 21, Juniata 14 
Gettysburg 31, Dickinson 
Wilkes 21, FDU 14 
Muhlenberg 20, Catholic 6 
Moravian 34, Upsala 7 
Washington & Lee 28, Ursinus 7 

• In high school games last week and 
weekend it was: 

Frankford 27, Olney 6 
Washington 6, Martin Luther King 6 
Southern 22, W. Philadelphia 16 
Bartram 14, Franklin 6 
Bok 24, Overbrook 13 
Central 25, Germantown 8 
Lincoln 6, Mastbaum 
Roxborough 34, Edison 
N. Catholic 12, Father Judge 7 
Cardinal O'Hara 31, St. James 14 
Arch. Carroll 17, Roman Cath. 
Monsignor Bonner 10, St. Josephs 
St. John Neumann 6, W. Catholic 
U. Dublin 48, Lower Moreland 16 
Hatboro-Horsham 16, Springfield 7 
Pennsbury 14, William Tennent 13 
Council Rock 34. Truman 
W.C. Henderson 31, Coatesville 7 
Lansdale Cath. 18. Perk. Valley 
Ger. Academy 13, Arch. Kennedy 12 
Penn Charter 37, Haverford Sch 21 
Quakertown 28, Cheltenham 6 
Wissahickon 20. Upper Moreland 6 
Souderton 34, Plymouth-White. 19 
Neshaminy 47. Bensalem 3 
Abington 14, Norristown 6 
C.B. East 7, Pennridge 6 
C.B. West 10. North Penn 
Dobbins 12. Un. City 
Willingboro 22. Bishop Egan 12 
Bishop McDevirt 14. Arch. Ryan 7 
Card. Dougherty 8, Bishop Kenrick 
Archbishop Wood 20. LaSalle 6 
• Newly acquired Chicago Bear quarter- 
back Doug Flutie went 23 of 30. two 
touchdowns and 301 yards Psyche' 
He was for 1 . 




Sports Quiz 

QUESTION #10: 

Who am I In the NFL? 1 was an all- 
pro wide receiver for the Kansas City 
Chiefs and an Integral part of the 
Chiefs Super Bowl years. I stand 6-3 
and weigh 215 and I could run like a 
deer and leap like a gazelle. In 1971, 
I gained over 1000 yards In pass re- 
ceptions. He was quarterback hen 
Dawsons favorite target and attend- 
ed college at Prairie View A&MJust 
outside of Houston. 

No one got week *8 question. The 
question was: When the NHL expanded 
in 1976, who were the two teams which 
came into the National Hockey League? 
(Hint was that one team is still active in 
the league.) Answer: The Washington 
Capitals and the Kansas City Scouts. 

If you think you know the answer to 
this week's question , all you have to do it 
put your name, box *, and answer on a 
piece of paper and have it placed into 
box 951 and if your correct answer is 
drawn you could win a burger, fries and 
pepsi FREE from Caesar's Pub. You 
can't win if you don't play. 



With only a few weeks left in the col- 
lege football season and with bowl talk 
beginning to brew, here's how the major 
divisions look along with some divisions 
of special intprest: 



Conference standings 



Records through Saturday's games 


IVY 


Cont AN Games . 


LEAGUE 


W L T W L T 


Penn 


5 8 


Cornell 


5 7 10 


Brown 


3 2 4 4 


Harvard 


2 3 2 6 


Princeton 


2 3 2 6 


Dartmouth 


2 3 2 6 


Yale 


14 2 6 


Columbia 


5 8 


M 


Con! All Games 


10 


W L T W L T 


Michigan 


6 9 


Ohio St 


6 8 2 


Minnesota 


4 2 5 4 


Iowa 


3 3 6 3 


Mch St. 


3 3 5 4 


Indiana 


3 3 6 3 


Wisconsin 


2 4 3 7 


Illinois 


2 4 3 6 


Purdue 


15 2 7 


N western 


6 2 7 


M 


CoM AN Games 


8 


W L T W L T 


Oklahoma 


5 8 10 


Colorado 


5 5 4 


Nebraska 


4 10 8 10 


Iowa St 


2 3 5 4 


Okia St 


2 3 4 5 


Kansas Sl 


14 2 7 


Missouri 


14 2 7 


Kansas 


5 3 6 



SOUTH- 


CoM 




All Gamas 


EASTERN 


w 


L 


T 


W L T 


Alabama 


4 








8 1 


Auburn 


3 


1 





8 1 


Georgw 


3 


2 





6 3 


Mississippi 


3 


1 





6 2 1 


ISO 


3 


1 





5 2 


Miss. St. 


2 


2 





6 3 


Florida 


2 


3 





5 4 


Kentucky 


1 


3 





4 4 1 


Tennessee 





3 





3 5 


Vandertxlt 





5 





1 8 


SOUTH- 


Conf. 


/ 


M Gamas 


WEST 


W 


L 


T 


W L T 


Texas A&M 


5 








7 1 


Arkansas 


4 


2 





7 2 


SMU 


4 


2 





5 4 


Baylor 


4 


2 





6 3 


Texas Tech 


4 


2 





6 3 


Texas 


3 


2 





4 4 


TCU 


1 


5 





3 6 


Rice 


1 


b 





2 6 


Houston 





b 





1 8 


PAOFIC 


CoM 


AH Games 


10 


w 


L 


T 


W L T 


An* St 


4 





1 


7 1 


UCLA 


4 


2 





6 3 


use 


4 


2 





6 2 


Arizona 


4 


2 





7 2 


Stanford 


4 


2 





7 2 


Wash ton 


3 


2 





6 2 


Wash St 


2 


a 


1 


3 5 1 


Oregon St 


1 


4 





2 6 


Oregon 


1 


5 





3 6 


California 


1 


5 





1 7 



ATLANTIC 


CoM. 




All Gamas 


COAST 


W L 


T 


W L T 


Clemson 


5 1 





7 2 


NC. State 


4 2 





6 2 1 


N Carolina 


3 2 





5 3 1 


Ga Tech 


3 2 





5 3 1 


Duke 


2 3 





4 5 


Virginia 


2 3 





3 6 


Maryland 


1 3 





4 5 


Wk Forest 


1 5 





4 5 


WESTERN 


CoM 


1 


All Gamas 


ATHLETIC 


W L 


T 


W L T 


Air Force 


5 1 





5 4 


Sn Diego St 


4 1 





6 2 


Wyoming 


4 2 





6 4 


BYU 


3 1 





5 2 


Hawaii 


3 2 





S 2 


Colo St 


3 3 





5 4 


New Max 


2 4 





3 7 


Utah 


1 5 





1 7 


UTEP 


6 





2 8 




CoM. 


Al Gamas 


YANKEE 


W L 


T 


W L T 


Delaware 


6 1 





7 2 


NewMamp 


4 2 





6 3 


Mass 


4 1 





7 2 


Conn 


3 2 





6 3 


Richmond 


3 3 





4 5 


Boston U 


2 4 





2 7 


Mame 


2 4 





6 4 


R Island 


6 





1 8 



COLOMAL 


W L 


T W L T 


Holy Cross 


4 


9 


Bucknell 


1 2 


3 6 


Lehigh 


1 1 


4 5 


Lafayette 


1 2 


5 4 


Colgate 


1 3 


3 6 


PSAC 


CoM. 


Al Gamas 


EAST 


W L 


T W L T 



HflWflf SVHIfj 


6 





9 


W Chester 


5 





7 2 


Bloomsburg 


3 2 


1 


6 2 1 


Kutztown 


3 2 


1 


5 4 1 


Cheyney 


1 5 





2 8 


Mansfield 


1 5 





2 7 


E Strdsbg. 


1 5 





1 8 


MKXM.E 


CoM. 


AN Gamas 


ATLANTIC 


W L 


T 


W L T 


Susquehanna 


8 





9 


Juniata 


6 2 





8 2 


Lycoming 


6 2 





7 2 


Wilkes 


5 3 





5 4 


Widener 


5 3 





7 3 


Dei Valley 


3 4 


1 


3 5 1 


Moravian 


3 5 


1 


3 5 1 


TCbx.ght 


2 6 





4 6 


Lab Valley 


1 7 





2 7 


Upsala 


8 





2 8 



CEN- 


CoM 


Al Gamas 


TENNIAL 


W 


L 


T W 


I T 


F&M 


6 





8 


1 


Muhtenburg 


6 


1 


6 


3 


Gettysburg 


4 


2 


5 


4 


Swarthmore 


4 


3 


4 


4 


Ursinus 


2 


3 


1 2 


5 1 


Dickinson 


1 


5 


2 


5 


J Hopkins 


1 


5 


1 2 


5 1 


W Maryland 





5 





7 








Al Games 


INDEPENDENTS 




W 


L T 


PENN ST 






9 





Miami Fia 






9 





VH.LANOVA 






7 


1 


Va. Tech 






7 


2 1 


Tulsa 






7 


3 


Boston Col. 






6 


3 


RUTGERS 






5 


3 1 


TEMPLE 






5 


4 


SW La 






5 


3 


(.mannati 






5 


5 


Florida St. 






5 


3 1 


Pittsburgh 






4 


4 1 


S Miss 






4 


4 


Army 






4 


5 


Notre Dame 






4 


4 


Navy 






3 


5 


Syracuse 






3 


5 


luiane 






3 


5 


W Virginia 






3 


5 


Wtchrts St. 






3 


7 


S Carokna 






2 


6 1 


Louisville 






2 


6 


N Illinois 






2 


8 


Memphis St 






1 


8 


E Carolina 






1 


8 





BMmyaiff® Wlfl®^ (Mfflcsg® 



Vol. XXI, No. 12 

Friday, November 21, 1986 




NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



Happy 
Thanksgiving! 



Where's the Discipline 
Around Here? 

Dear Editors, 

An R.A. is a very special person — a 
person who has taken on a job that few 
people would choose to perform. It's a 
job with few benefits other than the per- 
sonal satisfaction that they're willing to 
perform a task of great responsibility — 
and are able to do it effectively. 

The R.A.'s job is a very difficult task. 
We are often disliked, called names, ridi- 
culed and laughed at by our resident stu- 
dents. We deal with many problems which 
occur in the resident halls, and we are 
put under a great deal more stress than 
the average student. 

Because of this, we are greatly disturbed 
by the disciplinary actions administered 
by the administration to the offenders of 
residence hall policies and related of- 
fenses. The R.A.'s have a job to do and 
they do it quite well. However, the 
powers delegated to the R.A.'s, and their 
effectiveness, is greatly hampered when 
disciplinary action is delayed or com- 
pletely discarded in many cases. 

In particular, we are talking about the 
athletes. For example, an incident occur- 
red in a female dorm in which several 
athletes (in particular, football players) 
were involved. This incident went before 
the Student Conduct Committee and a 



decision was rendered to the President of 
the college, Dr. Feldstein. 

However, no action was ever taken to 
discipline or punish these students. We 
want to know one thing — WHY?!! Is it 
because they are athletes?? Rumor has it 
that a decision won't be made until foot- 
ball season is over. Consequently, we 
won't know because no one will com- 
ment on the situation. 

If this is true, we think it stinksl! Ath- 
letes are supposed to be our "model 
students," and they are supposed to 
represent our school. (Personally, I 
would rather be represented by a dairy 
cow.) 

In order for us to have a well-run 
school, a place one enjoys living in, the 
administration must stand behind the 
R.A.'s and not fold to pressure put on 
them by team coaches. We are given 
these jobs on the basis of our ability to do 
the job effectively. What good are the 
R.A.'s if we are continually undermined 
by the administrative staff?! Because of 
this, the R.A. job is becoming one of 
great responsibility and authority without 
any backing power. 

The question I would like to raise in 
writing this letter is — If the R.A.'s 
aren't afraid to do their jobs, why 
are the administrators? 

Name withheld 
upon request 




DVC F.I. STUDENT 

RECEIVES INSTITUTE 

SCHOLARSHIP 



Four students ieceived scholarship 
awards from the Philadelphia Section of 
the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) . 
The awards (three of $1,700 and one of 
$1,200) were presented at the Section's 
November meeting by awards chairman 



George LoPresti (Campbell Soup Co.). 
Recipients show are (L to R); Gregory 
Mattern, DVC; Karen Kolaetis, Univer- 
sity of Delaware; Linda Clark and Linda 
Garzarella, Drexel University. 



DVC IS: FACULTY 

by Annmarie Whitesell 

During the course of the semester you 
have come to love them, hate them, ad- 
mire them and thanked your lucky stars 
you do not have their job. The people I 
talk about are your professors. In the 
next couple of editions of Ram Pages, 
our staff has decided to take a close look 
at some of the memories they have col- 
lected while teaching at DVC. 

Dr. Miller, Head of Biology Depart- 
ment: "I was teaching microbiology lab at 
night one summer. There was a hurri- 
cane brewing outside, and suddenly all 
the power went. We turned down all the 
Bunsen burners to a yellow flame and I 
continued with the lecture and exercise. 
The atmosphere was really romantic. In 
fact, a marriage resulted from that class, 
and from what I understand, it's still 
going strong." 

Dr. Onr, Head of Chemistry Depart- 
ment: "My students have given me a lot 
of memories. The one incident that comes 
to mind is my old nickname 'lightning 
chalk'. My students, as a gag, made me 
a six-foot glow-in-the-dark piece of chalk. 
I think it's still in my basement some- 
where. I wonder if the kids still call me 
lightning chalk'? 

"Another good thing about teaching 
here was meeting my wife, who was one 
of the first female chemistry majors at 
DVC." 

Dr. Palumbo, Chairman of Food In- 
dustry: "My most satisfying moment as a 
professor occurs when I meet my students 
at professional meetings or out in the in- 
dustry. To see my students being suc- 
cessful or achieving their goals, makes it 
all worthwhile." 

If you have any memories, insights or 
good stories you would like to share with 
Ram Pages, please get in touch with Ann 
Whitesell via P.O. Box 785. 



Christmas Dinner / Concert 

You are invited to join The Delaware 
Valley College Band and Chorale on 
Sunday, December 7th at 5 p.m. as they 
welcome in the upcoming season of 
Christmas. If you have longed to hear 
the traditional carols of this season, set 
this date aside for a very special evening. 
Hors d'oeuvres will be served around the 
wassail bowl at 5 p.m. complete with en- 
tertainment and toasting. Following the 
toasts, a three-course dinner will be served 
in the candle-lit Student Center Auditori- 
um. The auditorium will be transformed 
into an old-fashioned setting with several 
scenes used by the performers. During 
the course of the evening, the audience 
will be invited to join in the singing of 
their favorite carols. The cost of the 
evening is $25 per couple or $12.50 for 
a single ticket. Reservations are sug- 
gested due to limited seating and a self- 
addressed envelope with a check cover- 
ing the amount should be mailed to: 
Liberal Arts Department, Concert Series, 
Delaware Valley College, Doylestown, 
PA 18901. For further information call 
345-1500. 





Smilin' Steve Zenko was recently named Direc- 
tor of Admissions. He moves up from Associate 
Director to his new post (Bob Sauer wiil stay 
with Financial Aid as his main responsibility, 
helping you impoverished students pay the 
bills!) Photo/DVC Public Info. 



This Week on * 
Campus 

by Wendy L. Unger 

FRIDAY. NOVEMBER II 

Men's BB (A) vs. Cabrini, 
8 p.m. 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21 

Hiel Auction, APR 

Men's BB (A) vs. Beaver, 
3:30 p.m. 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23 

34 days until Christmas" 
Bttl Rein's lucky day! 
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24 

Wresting (A) vs. Brown, 4 p.m 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25 

Men's BB (A) vs. Eastern, 8 p.m. 
Thanksgiving Break begins at 4 p 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27 

Than ksgjving Day! Enjoy a good 
home-cooked meal 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28 

Women's BB (A) vs. GaBaudet 
Tournament, 6 p.m. 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 29 

Men's BB (A) vs. Urstnus, 7:30 p.m. 

Women's BB (A) Gaflaudet 
Tournament, 2 p.m. 

MONDAY, DECEMBER 1 

Men's BB (H) vs. Kings, 8 p.m 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2 

Thanksgiving break ends 8:30 am 

(boofl. 

Women's BB (H) vs. Upsala, 7 p.m 

tY. DECEMBERS 

Men's BB (A) vs. FDU-Madtoon. 
8 p^m. 

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4 

Women's BB (A) vs. Drew, 7:30 





198788 R. A 
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE 

"We Need A Few Good 
Men and Women!" 

The Residence Life Office is accepting 
applications for Resident Assistant staff 
positions for the 1987-88 academic year. 
Applications and reference forms may be 
obtained from the Residence Life Office 
on the second floor of the Student Cen- 
ter. All completed forms must be returned 
no later than Friday, December 12, 1986. 

To apply, you must have lived on 
campus here at DVC for at least one 
semester. You must be in good academic 
standing and be able to communicate 
well, make quick decisions and exhibit 
good judgement in difficult situations. It 
will give you the opportunity to become 
a vital part of our campus community. 

Appointments are made for one se- 
mester, with renewals based on overall 
performance. The remuneration is the 
cost of your room plus a $240 salary for 
your first year. Each applicant will be 
notified as to the scheduling of their in- 
terviews early next semester. 

You are strongly encouraged to apply! 
This is your chance to take an active role 
in improving campus life at DVC. Being 
a Resident Assistant nils a unique role as 
a leader and teacher. Employers are 
looking for people who have this type of 
experience in supervision and counseling 
in a working situation. You will receive 
training, assistance and the satisfaction of 
doing a good job. 

If you have any questions or would like 
any further information, please feel free 
to talk to a Resident Assistant, or stop up 
in the Residence Life Office and talk with 
Mrs. Somerville or Mr. Lombardi. Pick 
up your application packet today and re- 
member, "we need a few good men and 
women." 

RESIDENCE LIFE BITS 

Anyone wanting to change rooms for 
the spring '87 semester should make 
their requests known at the Residence 
Life Office by Tuesday, November 25th. 
Your name will be placed on a waiting 
list, and we will attempt to honor your re- 
quest as circumstances permit. 

A limited number of both male and 
female on-campus housing opportunities 
will be available second semester. If you 
are interested in moving onto campus in 
'87, stop by the Residence Life Office at 
your earliest convenience. 

Residence Life: 
Dorms Take No Vacations! 

All dormitories will remain open over 
the Thanksgiving break. All residents are 
reminded to secure their rooms by lock- 
ing windows and doors and also un- 
plugging all electrical appliances. 
The female residence halls will be locked 
during the entire vacation period, so all 
female students must use their access 
cards to enter the buildings. If you plan 
on staying in the dormitory over the 
break, please inform the Residence Life 
Office before Friday, November 21st. 

No meals will be served after the din- 
ner meal (4:30-5:30 p.m.) Tuesday, 
November 25th. The first meal served 
after the break will be the dinner meal on 
Monday, December 1st (5-6 p.m.). Our 
traditional Thanksgiving dinner will take 
place on Thursday, November 20th. 
Please make reservations for one of the 
searings. The Food Committee will be 
taking reservations that week in the cafe- 
teria lobby. 

Have an enjoyable Thanksgiving Day 
and a pleasant extended weekend. 

PLEASE NOTE: An electrical shut- 
down to do emergency repair work has 
been scheduled over Thanksgiving break. 
The power may be shut off for em ex- 
tended period of time during that time. 
Please plan accordingly. 



Notes from Underground 

(at the Library) 

Some new magazines you might like 
to browse through downstairs at the Li- 
brary include Harrowsmlth, a cross be- 
tween Country Journal and Mother Earth 
News. Glossy, fun to read, the articles 
cover topics from weeds for your supper 
to super efficient housing. Another new 
item this year is Maclean's, the Canadian 
equivalent to Time or Newsweek. It's in- 
dexed in Reader's Guide so you can find 
material by subject too. 

The Library has been increasing its 
collection of computer related jour- 
nals to include A + , for APPLE users, 
BYTE, Collegiate Microcomputer and 
Computerworld 

In January look for the start of our 
new subscription to National Geographic 
Research. It combines the beautiful lay- 
out of National Geographic with more sci- 
entific text. It should be a useful addition. 

Do you know that our Library belongs 
to a cooperative of 33 local college li- 
braries? DVC students and faculty are 
eligible to borrow books directly from 
these libraries. A signed letter of in- 
troduction from our library is the only 
requirement. 

For more information and a list of li- 
braries belonging to the Tri-State College 
Library Cooperative (TCLC) ask at the 
Circulation Desk. 

FINALS SCHEDULE 

Thurs., 12/11 & ft _ . 

Fri 12/12 °-^ a.m. -midnight 

Sat., 12/13 9 a.m. -3 p.m. 
Sun., 12/14 2 p.m. -midnight 

Mon., 12/15 
Tues., 12/16 

Wed., 12/17 8:30 a.m. -midnight 
Thurs., 12/18 
Fri., 12/19 

Sat., 12/20 9 a.m. -12:30 p.m. 
Sun., 12/21 CLOSED 
Mon., 12/22 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 



collegiate crosstvord 




Bucks County Honey Show 

The Annual Bucks County Honey 
Show was held on Thursday, November 
13, 1986 at DVC. The show was spon- 
sored by the Bucks County Beekeepers 
Association in conjunction with the DVC 
Student Beekeeping Club. The show 
was judged by Dr. Bob Berthold, the col- 
lege's beekeeping specialist, and he was 
assisted by Mr. Clarence Smith, the Pres- 
ident of the College's Beekeeping Club. 

Criteria for the judging of the honey 
was clarity, freedom from impurities, 
market appearance, freedom from crys- 
tals and moisture content. Mr. Al Effrig, 
who lives in Philadelphia but who keeps 
bees in Bucks County, took first place in 
the light honey and the amber honey 
categories plus a second place in the 
dark honey and in the beeswax. Based 
on his scoring the most number of points 
in the show, he was awarded the en- 
graved silver tray presented by the DVC 
Student Beekeeping Club. Other award 
winners were Mr. Don O'Bott of Chal- 
font who took first place in the dark 
honey category plus second in the amber 
honey category. Mr. Bill Boston of Fur- 
long, who just started keeping bees this 
year, took third place in the dark honey 
category. 

The next meeting of the Bucks County 
Beekeepers Association is scheduled for 
Thursday evening, March 26th, 1987, at 
8 p.m. in Mandell Hall on the DVC 
campus. 



i?34 lis t 7 8 § mo ii n nr 

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©Edward Julius Collegiate CW84-14 



ACROSS 

1 With 10-Across, 

famed spy 
5 ...partridge 1n 

tree 

10 See 1-Across 

14 Mrthstone 

15 Words of denial 

16 Mr. Premlnger 

17 Type of word 

18 Certain playing 
card 

19 Well: Sp. 

20 Promptness 

23 Clothing size 
(abbr.) 

24 Zodiac sign 

25 Takes 1t easy 
(2 wds.) 

29 As hungry 

33 Enliven 

35 Living room: Sp. 

36 Opie's aunt 

37 Hockey great 

38 Spasm 

39 Vases 

41 Tending to stir up 
45 In a sloped 
manner 

47 Francis and Dahl 

48 Monetary worth 
(abbr.) 



49 Woman's name or 
song 

50 Scientist's work 

59 " and a Woman" 

60 Gay 

61 Capri, for one 

62 Sodium chloride 

63 Cordage fiber 

64 But: Fr. 

65 Catch sight of 

66 Contestant 

67 Adam's grandson 

DOWN 

1 Player's turn 

2 Highest point 

3 Infield cover 

4 Italian architect 

5 West Indies Island 

6 Sweet wine 

7 Small case 

8 Military equipment, 
for short 

9 Drive back 

10 Associates 
familiarly 

11 "It's game" 

12 Map notations 
(abbr.) 

13 Charged particles 
21 Certain doctoral 

degree (abbr.) 



22 Jacques Cousteau's 
domain 

25 Picture game 

26 Make a great effort 

27 Classic movie 
western 

28 Type of vote 

29 Heart chambers 

30 Dine at home 
(2 wds.) 

31 Like Jacques Brel 

32 The Marx Brothers' 
"A Day at the " 

34 Part of a circle 

40 The age of some 
septuagenarians 

41 Geometric curve 

42 In a cliche^ 
manner 

43 M*A*S*H star 

44 Daily occurrence 1n 
England 

46 avion 

50 Alleviate 

51 Certain holiday, 
for short 

52 Insect appendage 

53 Water pipe 

54 Formerly 

55 Approaching 

56 "No man island" 

57 Sundry assortment 

58 Robert Stack role 



NOTICE 
TO OUR READERS 

Due to the Thanksgiving break, Ram 
Pages next issue (No. 13) will be avail- 
able Friday, December 5. 

Our first day back at DVC will be cap- 
ped off by our 7 p.m. PIZZA MEETING. 
At this time we will discuss the usual 
"next issue" assignments, layout the 
paper, edit, count article lengths and 
organize SANTA LINE sales. 

Enjoy your Thanksgiving, eat a hearty 
meal and take it easy. Christmas holidays 
are just around the corner. 



Christmas Dinner Dance 

The Men of Farm 1 and Student Gov- 
ernment would like to announce their 
Second Annual Semi-Formal Christmas 
Dinner Dance on Saturday, December 
13. A hot buffet will be served and all 
students, faculty, administration and staff 
are welcome. Tickets will be on sale No- 
vember 20-December 5 in the Cafeteria. 
The price for admission will be $15 a 
couple and $8 for a single. It will be an 
event you will not want to miss!! 



ATTENTION STUDENTS... 

Job Experience to Complement Your Education 

If you are seeking part-time, full-time or live-in employ- 
ment in the human services field, PAI invites you to begin 
your professional career working with people who have a 
mental or physical handicap and need YOU. 



PAI WANTS: 

* people who are caring and 
enthusiastic 

* people who can use their 
education or life ex- 
perience to build a career 

* people who respect the 
rights of others with 
disabilities 



PAI OFFERS YOU: 

• training and continuing 
education 

• challenging, rewarding 
experience 

• flexible schedule— full- 
time, part-time, live-in 

• professional career ad- 
vancement opportunities 

• a chance to share yourself 
with others 

• excellent fringe benefits 

PAI WANTS YOU... 

If you want professional growth while you share your life 
with those who need you most. 

Gain the valuable experience PAI can give you by calling 
(215) 822-6417 for your application or by sending your 
resume to: 




Prospectus Associates, Inc. 

Twin Park Industrial Center • 3151 Advance Lane 
Colmar. PA 18915 • (215) 822-6417 



W = Wrestling 
WBB = Women's Basketball 
MBB = Men's Basketball 



Delaware Valley College 
1986 DECEMBER 1986 




Sunday 




Annual Christmas 
Dinner & Concert 

Featuring . . . 
DVC Band & Chorale 

APR • 5-10 p.m. 



wm 




Monday 



NO CLASSES 



MBB/Kings/H/8 p.m. 



8 




WBB/Moravian/H/7 p.m. 



15 



FINALS 



22 




28 




29 



Tuesday 



2 



Classes resume at 

8:30 a.m. Follow a 

Friday schedule. 

W/Wiiliamson/A 
WBB/Upsala/H/7 p.m. 



9 




MBB/Elizabethtown/H/8 p.m. 



16 



FINALS 



23 



Faculty & Staff 
Christmas Party 

3 p.m. 



30 




Wednesday 



3 




"STARMAN 

APR «9p.m 
MBB/FDU/A/8 p.m. 



10 



Speaker on 
World Terrorism 

APR • 7:30 p.m. 
Sponsored by Hillel 

W/Swarthmore & Del. State/ A 
WBB/Scranton/H/7 p.m. 




FINALS 



24 



Christmas 
Eve 



31 



Neu? Year's 
Eve 

Welcome 1987! 



Thursday 



FFADAY 

Linda Black 

Caesar's Pub • 9 p.m. -midnight 
WBB/Drew/A/7.30 p.m. 



11 



Reading Day 

No more classes! 

Campus Film: Target 

APR • 9 p.m. 
Christmas Dinner in Cafe 



18 



FINALS 



25 




MERRY 
CHRISTMAS 



Registration Schedule 

Seniors 
Juniors 

Sophomores 



Jan 12th 



Freshmen 

Classes 
begin 



Jan. 13th 



Jan. 14th 



Friday 



5 



DVC Drama Play 

"Jack & the Beanstalk* 

Starts at 7:30 p.m. 
in the coffeehouse 

4H Awards Ceremony 

APR 



12 



WW 




'. 1 1'/ ' 



\* 




<4 

tLSBEC 




F 
I 

N 
A 

L 
S 



Saturday 



■<$& 



DVC Drama Play 

"Jack & the Beanstalk" 

7:30 p.m. • Coffeehouse 

W/York Spartan Toum./A/10:30 a.m. 
WBB/Miseracordia/H/2 p.m. 
MBB/Drew/A/7:30 p.m. 



13 



Semi-Formal 
Dinner Dance 

APR 

FINALS 



20 



26 



fll 




Mr'''/ 





Dorms and Dining Hall 
both will close. 

Have a great holiday break! 

FINALS END 



27 



Happy Hanukkah 




APICS Scholarship and 
Paper Competition 

The Bucks- Mont Chapter of the 
American Production and Inventory 
Control Society, Inc. is offering a five- 
hundred dollar ($500) scholarship to a 
DVC junior. Candidates must have com- 
pleted BA3129 Production Management 
and have a 3.0 or higher GPA. 

See Dr. Avery, 119 Feldman, for more 
information. 

A cash award will be made for outstand- 
ing student papers on production, man- 
agement and inventory control topics. 
This is open to students currently enrolled 
in BA3129 Production Management. 

See Dr. Avery or Mr. Simone for addi- 
tional details. 



On Wednesday, October 20. a delegation of Chinese visited the campus to learn more about DVC's methods 
in processing and storage of foods The five guests and their USA contacts toured the facilities and lunched 
with members of the faculty and administration Displayed in the photograph, where the group posed in front 
of the Library, is the delegation's gift to the school, a panda bear wallhanging Photo/ DVC Public Info 



NAMA MEETING 

The Del Val Chapter of NAMA (Na- 
tional Agricultural Marketing Associa- 
tion) will meet Tuesday, November 
18, 1986 in Feldman (Ag.) 122. We 

are close to getting our charter through 
the Chesapeake Bay professional chapter 
so we need to get officers elected and 
dues paid! Also, we will go over the final 
draft of our constitution. Membership is 
open to all DVC students who desire to 
get that "competitive edge" through : 

• developing professional knowledge 
and career contacts; 

• developing communication and lead- 
ership skills; 

• discovering internship and job oppor- 
tunities; 

• gaining exposure in the agribusiness 
industry. 

Initial dues are $20 payable as soon as 
possible. Don't miss out on this chance 
to gain valuable experience and exposure 
on a professional level. 

If you have any questions, see Dr. 
Avery or any NAMA member. 



Veterinary Medicine: 
Bio Club Presents Speaker 

Two DVC graduates will talk on their 
veterinary careers on Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 2 at 4:10 p.m. in Mandell 216. 

Tim Ireland '85, in his first year at 
Penn, will present the view of a new stu- 
dent in a program. He spent one year as 
lab animal technician at Rohm and Haas 
Co. 

Dr. Linda Silverman Bachin 78, who 
now is DVC's Poultry Diagnostic Lab 
director, will speak from the viewpoint of 
a seasoned professional. She received 
her veterinary training at Penn also. 

All interested majors are welcome. 
Questions/answers will follow. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: Cooler Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

Areo's Best Lunches 11 AM-3 PM 

Hoppy Hour 4-6:30 PM 

Rt 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



More DVC Floriculture 
Students Honored 

$1,300 in scholarships was awarded 
to DVC students in 1986 by the P.F.A. 
(Pennsylvania Florists Association). The 
P.F.A. is a non-profit trade and educa- 
tional association that represents the 
whole spectrum of the floriculture indus- 
try in Pennsylvania. The association was 
founded in the early 1950's and has 
grown to represent Pennsylvania's floral 
growers, suppliers and retailers. The 
organization has awarded thousands of 
dollars in scholarships to DVC floriculture 
students since 1985. This year Joan 
Comly, a sophomore, received $350; 
Mary Lou Zuck, a junior, received $600; 
and Patricia Duffy, a senior, received 
$350. 



DVC Players presents... 
"Jack & the Beanstalk" 

Fri. 12/5 7:30 p.m., Coffeehouse 

Sat. 12/6 12 noon, Hot Dog 

Theatre, Coffeehouse 

Sun. 12/7 7:30 p.m., Coffeehouse 

Characters include: Joe Ryan as 
the giant, Kevin Dickmyer as Jack, 
Bonnie Anderson as Jack's mother, 
Nick Shvidrik as junior, Missy Brangan 
as the wife, Jon Boyd as the stranger 
and Donna Albert as Dame Isobell. 

Call 345-1500, ext. 2216, for ticket 
information. Limited seating. 



DVC Student Store 
Week Long Christmas Sale 

Mon 12/1 All clothing 30% OFF 
Tues 12/2 All tapes 20% OFF 

Wed. 12/3 Trade in your old posters 
for $ 1 off a new poster 
Thurs. 12/4 50% OFF all 

Christmas items 
Fri 12/5 50% OFF all 

Christmas items 
Open from 8:45 a.m. -4:30 p.m. daily 



Kaplan 
"Early BircTclasses. 

Mcar 



Sessvons 
#1-6 Deo. 



21 - Jan. 4 



GRE 



§7-8 taught just prior 
to 4/25/87 exam. 



Classes beginning NOW 
for 12/13/86 exam ? 



GMAT - 



Classes beginning early Dec , 
for 1/24/87 exam. 



\Afe 11 prepare you for one of these career- 
shaping exams and still leave you plenty of 
time to spare. And if you need a quick 
refresher before the exam, bone up with our 
Test-N-Tape series at any of our 120 centers. 
Right up to the last minute. 

So enroll. Today Because everyone 
knows what the early bird gets. 

£ KAPLAN 

STANLEY H.KAPl AN EDUCATIONAL CENTER LTD. 

546-3317/635-3116 



AG MARKETING COOP 

SERVES UP 
TASTY INVESTMENTS! 

by Margaret Freeman 

A kick off breakfast introduced AGRI 
BUSINESS MARKETING ASSOCIATES 
to the quality agricultural products they 
offer to the college family and neighbor- 
ing community. Maple syrup starred at 
this breakfast. The 100% pure maple 
syrup from Pennsylvania's Bradford 
County tasted delicious on the peach frit- 
ters and waffles. 

While members ate. the other products 
available for sale were noted. 

From Georgia come the famous pecans 
in large halves. As part of the 1986 har- 
vest these nuts left the trees just prior to 
shipping a few weeks ago. This fresh crop 
is available in plain or butter roasted. The 
plain pecans make an excellent baking 
ingredient or snack. As a snack the butter 
roasted pecans are outstanding. 

Also, a good performer for those try- 
ing times of what to eat is Tom Sturgis's 
pretzels in special decorator tins and 
Goode's potato chips. 

Marketing manager, Mr. Frank Hoff- 
man, chaired this meeting and described 
how our efforts can serve a need for the 
community in the upcoming snack period 
of final exams and the cooking and gift 
giving period of the winter holidays. This 
should be an excellent opportunity for 
the cooperative stockholders to see how 
excelk*nt- quality agricultural products are 
wanted by the public. And for the public 
to enjoy an easy avenue to satisfy its 
needs. 

Members of the Agricultural Sales and 
Marketing class can answer any specific 
questions for you and can provide you 
with prompt delivery of all the products. 
You can ask these people: Joe Ryan. 
Tish Duffy, Frank Hoffman, Eric Vanden 
Berghe, Steve Smyth, Jackie Heflich, 
Dan Hoke, Jim Fania, Robert Martucci, 
Beth Whetstone, Lisa Schweitzer, David 
Hirtle, Tracy Snyder, Tim Kohl, Bette- 
Lynne Andrefsky and Margaret Freeman. 



Food Committee Meeting 

The Food Committee has scheduled 
another open meeting with all interested 
students. The meeting will be held Mon- 
day, November 24 at 4:15 p.m. in the 
Student Government Room of the Stu- 
dent Center. 

The committee members have held 
meetings with the Dining Service and the 
M.W. Wood Company. The committee 
appreciates help from students and would 
like to meet with them to report the 
results from their most recent meetings. 

Thank you. 

The Food Committee 
Clair Thompson 
Greg Christiansen 
Dave Sports 




J 



STAFF 

Editors-in-Chief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. linger 

Artist Monica Etzweiler 

Reporters Mike Bolles, Missy 

Brangan, Brett Hart, Judy Henry, John 

Nicholson, Melanie O'Neill, Brian 

Taggart, Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry, Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 

Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news In the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 




p°Kt 




^a^-Up 



Athlete of the Week: 

With the football season concluding 
for DVC and its Aggies last weekend, 
let's salute a group, no, an infantry of 
war horse, rock solid, fighting men who, 
week in and week out, open up holes for 
fleet footed backs, put awaiting defenders 
on their butts during sweeps and pro- 
tected their quarterback as they were a 
fortress protecting a king. 

This is the Aggie offensive front and 
we salute the following men, three of 
which are seniors and three of whom will 
return. At tackles, there was Dave "Chief 
Hannichick, a 6-3, 247 lb. sophomore 
from Hazelton H.S. in Hazelton. PA; 
Paul Liquori, a 6-2. 270 lb. senior from 
Haddon Heights H.S. in Runemede, 
NJ; and Jesse Perkins, a 6-0, 227 lb. 
senior from Palmyra H.S. in Palmyra, 
NJ. At guards there was Joe Harby, a 
6-4, 254 lb. senior from Walton Central 
H.S. in Walton. NY and Jim George, a 
6-1, 218 lb. freshman from Pottsville 
H.S. in Marlin, PA. Anchoring the whole 
line, the middle cog if you will, is center 
Brian Clapp, a 5-11, 215 lb. senior from 
Taconic Hills H.S. in Hillsdale, NY. 
Congratulations guys, for a fine season, 
for your dedication and hard work and 
for being named Athletes of the Week. 

BOYLE LEADS E.M.O. 
TO THE PROMISE LAND 

Chris "Heisman Hopeful" Boyle passed 
for over 200 yards and a touchdown to 
lead E.M.O. to Intramural Champions. 
The game was played in a steady rain. 
But rain, sleet or snow could not stop 
Boyle who wants the Heisman bad. 
Scoring the touchdown was Mike Zendt. 
Adding the extra point was Jim Bauzon. 
The offensive line did a great job protect- 
ing Boyle despite the conditions. They 
were Jim Bauzon. Steve Smyth and 
Steve Botto. 

The defense was led by Tim Brennan. 
Jim Bauzon. Wayne Lutzey and Dennis 
Williams. Those four constantly had 
pressure on the quarterback. Cy Rother, 
Vince Pastore and Bill Boyle were also a 
key in the victory. They covered the re- 
ceivers like glue. E.M.O. finished the 
season 6-0. 

They are now ranked *2 and waiting 
to see if they get a bowl bid Also, we will 
have to wait and see if Chris "Heisman 
Hopeful" Boyle will win the Heisman. 

1. Miami (FL) 10-0 

2. E.M.O 6-0 

3. Oklahoma 9-1 

4. Arizona State 9-0-1 

5. Nebraska 9-1 

6. Ohio State 9-2 

7. Michigan 9-1 

8. Alabama 9-2 

9. L.S.U 7-2 

10. Penn State 10-0 

11. Washington 7-2-1 

12. Texas A&M 8-2 

13. Arizona 7-2 

14. Auburn 8-2 

15. Arkansas 8-2 

16. Stanford 7-2 

17. UCLA 6-3-1 

18. Baylor 7-3 

19. Clemson 7-2-1 

20. Iowa 7-3 

21. North Carolina State 7-2-1 

22. Georgia 7-3 

23. Florida State 6-3-1 

24. Boston College 7-3 

25. Virginia Tech 8-2-1 








MADISON SQUARE GARDEN 




FOLLOW THE KMCKS 

TV: WM CMmmI I 

RAM): WNK 66 AM 

CAKE: MatteM Soura Garten 




FOLLOW THE RANGERS 

TV W0BMMMI9 
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Ticket Information 
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Ticketron information 

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Knicks Hotline 



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AGGIE OFFENSE AWAKENS BUT DROPS FINaALE TO 
WILKES; FIRST WILKES WIN OVER DVC SINCE 79 



by John Litzke 

The ending of two events in history 
took place last Tuesday and last Satur- 
day. Sixty-eight years ago last Tuesday, 
the Armistice was signed between the 
Triple Entente and the Triple Alliance to 
put an end to the first World War. And 
last Saturday, the 1986 DVC football 
season came to a close with an offensive 
surge that would put a scare into even 
Von Hindenberg's shoes but the 20 points 
DVC scored wouldn't be enough as 
Wilkes outlasted the Aggies 24-20. 

DVC started the scoring at 8: 14 of the 
first quarter when a very fine 12-play, 
59-yard drive was completed by senior 
quarterback Walt Kobryznski as he ran it 
in from two yards out to give DVC the 
quick jump 7-0. The touchdown was set 
up by the DVC rushing attack and con- 
tributing to that attack was Kobryznski, 
Jim Wilson, Joe Belb and Tony Sandone. 

The Colonels would come right back 
three minutes later when junior wide re- 
ceiver Tony Digrazia took an end around 
and sped down the sideline untouched 
45 yards for the score to make it 7-7. 
John Ford knocked through the first of 
his two field goals, this one from 29 
yards out, to put DVC up 10-7 at the 
14:18 mark of the second quarter. Wilkes 
kicker Sean Meagley would knock one 
of his own through at 10:10 to tie the 
score. 

With time running out in the half DVC 
suffered a temporary setback when, with 
only 0:09 remaining, senior Colonel 
quarterback Brad Scarborough (13 of 24 
for 126 yards) hit junior flanker Ron 
Ulitchney with a 15-yard touchdown 
pass and the half ended with the score 
17-10. 

The first half stats were relatively even. 
The intensity level of this DVC team was 
reaching its peak and a win for the seniors 
in their final game would have been the 



most satisfying aspect and probably would 
have made up for all the inconsistency 
and frustration on offense this season. I 
think this was the one thing on each 
member of the 1986 team's minds as 
they ran out for second half action. 

Wilkes mounted on their lead, how- 
ever, as following a DVC turnover senior 
running back Dean Ambosie took it in 
from one-yard out at 9:35 of the third to 
give Wilkes the semi-comfortable 24-10 
lead. 




DVC wasn't done yet though as junior 
running back Jimmy Wilson capped off a 
fine 13-play, 69-yard drive and ran it in 
from three yards out to make the score 
24-17 with plenty of time remaining. 
Wilson, who's really done it all year for 



the Aggies, ran for 136 yards on 33 car- 
ries to give him his second 100 + ground 
gain of the year and gave him a total of 
740 yards for the season. Wilson raised 
his career rushing mark at DVC to 2. 150 
and he is sure to shatter the all-time DVC 
rushing record of 2.311 set by Eric 
Reynolds in 79-'82. (He'll need 161 
yards next season. The record should be 
his by the third game next season, if not 
sooner.) 

Then with 10:30 left in the game DVC 
was sitting pretty on the Colonel 16 and 
on fourth down chose to kick the field 
goal and John Ford did from 26 yards to 
make it a tighter 24-20. Ballgame. Why 
not go for it when you are that close to 
the goal line? It's so easy to second guess 
and that was probably the right decision 
being that the fourth quarter was only 
four minutes and 30 seconds old. 

DVC would fight until the end, but 
there would be no more scoring as it fin- 
ished up 24-20. 

Some football firsts occurred as a result 
of the loss to Wilkes. It marked DVC's 
first losing season since 1978, marked 
Wilkes' first winning season since 1974 
and it marked the first time Wilkes has 
defeated DVC since 1979. 

The final stats had DVC up in almost 
every category. DVC led in rushing, 60 
carries for 245 yards to Wilkes' 25 carries 
for 121 yards, first downs with 16 to 
Wilkes' 12, total offensive plays with 77 
to Wilkes' 49 and in total offense with 
314 yards to Wilkes' 237. The only im- 
portant stat they were edged out in was 
the score. 

Let's not leave the 1986 season with- 
out some tributes. Congratulations to all 
the seniors on a fine season and con- 
tinued success and congrats to the whole 
DVC team and coaching staff for their 
dedication, hard work and stamina. 
Thank you. 







LITZKE'S 
SPORTS' BRIEFS 

by John Litzke 

• Cy Young Awards were given out this 
week and I don't think there was any 
doubt as to who would be getting 
them. In the National League it was 
Mike Scott of Houston who was 18-10 
in '86 with a major league leading 306 
strikeouts and led Houston to the Na- 
tional League finals. In the American it 
was Roger Clemens, the Boston fire- 
baller, who led the Sox into the World 
Series and finished the '86 season with 
some incredible statistics. League lead- 
ing era of 2.48, 238 strikeouts, which 
was second in the league, beat every 
team in the league at least once and 
had a 24-4 record to show it. 

• Temple University has landed two of 
the highest touted basketball players in 
the country and both are out of the 
same Michigan High School. Mark 
Macon, a 6-4 shooting guard and 6-5 
Shawn Randolph each signed letters of 
intent to attend Temple. Both are 
Street & Smith's High School all- 
Americans with Macon averaging 32 
points and 10 rebounds and Randolph 
averaging 21 points, 14 rebounds, 3 
blocks and 4 steals. Way to go Owls. 

• Pete Rose, Cincinnati's player/manag- 
er, has taken himself off of the roster to 
make room for a highly touted pros- 
pect. Rose could now be picked up by 
some other team but Reds officials said 
that would be unlikely as Rose will still 
remain Reds manager. 

• In major college football last week with 
the season winding down it was: 
Miami, FL 23, Tulsa 10 
Oklahoma 28, Colorado 

Pitt 20, Rutgers 6 
Boston College 27, Syracuse 9 
Tennessee 22, Mississippi 10 
Nebraska 70, Kansas 
Northwestern 24, Michigan St. 21 
Minnesota 20, Michigan 17 
Penn St. 24, Notre Dame 19 
Arkansas 14, Texas A&M 10 
Alabama 24, Temple 14 
Baylor 23, Rice 17 
Oregon St. 10, BYU 7 
Texas 45, TCU 16 
SMU 13, Texas Tech 7 
Ohio St. 33, Wisconsin 17 

• Big, big showdowns tomorrow!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 
Nebraska vs. Oklahoma 

USC vs. UCLA 
Penn vs. Cornell 
Penn St. vs. Pitt 
Michigan vs. Ohio St. 
Arizona vs. Arizona St. 

• In college football games of interest: 
Delaware 27, Navy 14 
Villanova 28, Widener 9 

West Chester 7, Millersville 3 
(W.C. wins Division crown) 

Dickinson 21, Ursinus 7 

Army 56, Lafayette 48 

Susquehanna 26, Albright 
(Susquehanna wins MAC crown) 

Gettysburg 14, Franklin & Marshall 13 

Moravian 14, Muhlenberg 

Juniata 35, Upsala 15 

Lycoming 30, Lebanon Valley 13 

Edinboro 57, Fairmont St. 33 

Lehigh 17, Bucknell 7 

Penn 17, Harvard 10 



• Knees and Hubie Brown are bothering 
Patrick Ewing, Knicks star center. 

• And, wait a minute, Andrew Toney re- 
tire? Sources say he's thinking about it. 

• The University of Texas women's bas- 
ketball team is ranked *1 in preseason 
poll. Louisiana Tech, Tennessee, 
Auburn and USC round out the top 
five. 

• Don't miss this one for the world. 
January 2, 1987, Fiesta Bowl, Penn 
St. vs. Miami, National Champion- 
ship, should be a classic. 

•In NFL action in week number 11 it 
was: 

Detroit 13, Philadelphia 11 
N.Y. Giants 22, Minnesota 20 
Miami 34, Buffalo 24 
Pittsburgh 21, Houston 10 
N.Y. Jets 31, Indianapolis 16 
Chicago 13, Atlanta 10 
New Orleans 16, St. Louis 7 
Cincinnati 34, Seattle 7 
New England 30, L.A. Rams 28 
Green Bay 31, Tampa Bay 7 
Denver 38, Kansas City 17 
Dallas 24, San Diego 21 
L.A. Raiders 27, Cleveland 14 
Monday night it was: 
Washington 14, San Francisco 6 

• Sunday it will be: 
Philadelphia at Seattle 
Buffalo at New England 
Dallas at Washington 
Denver at N.Y. Giants 
Detroit at Tampa Bay 
Green Bay at Chicago 
Indianapolis at Houston 
Minnesota at Cincinnati 
Pittsburg at Cleveland 
Atlanta at San Francisco 
Kansas City at St. Louis 
New Orleans at L.A. Rams 
Monday night it will be: 

N.Y. Jets at Miami 

• Sixers need help in the size depart- 
ment. Remain one game behind Bos- 
ton as of Sunday. Moses grabs season 
high 21 rebounds and buckets 38 
points in Washington's win over In- 
diana. Oh no! 

• Flyers pummel Caps Sunday night to 
take the lead in the Patrick by a point. 
Who would've thought the Flyers would 
be jockeying for position with the Pitts- 
burgh Penguins. 

• In high school action this past week 
and weekend it was: 

Frankford 51, Martin Luther King 8 
W. Philadelphia 22, University City 6 
Southern 28, Overbrook 9 
Central 42, Gratz 6 
Dobbins 14, Roxborough 
Bok 14, Bartram 
Lincoln 3, Olney 
Washington 27, Germantown 12 
Northeast 35, Mastbaum 
Franklin 36, Edison 
McDevitt 25, Father Judge 6 
Cardinal O'Hara 9, St. James 7 
Arch. Carroll 28, St. Joseph's Prep 7 
Arch. Wood 13, Bishop Egan 

• The Public and Catholic League play- 
offs are set: Tomorrow at Veterans 
Stadium in South Philly the Catholic 
playoff double-header will feature: 
McDevitt vs. Wood at 1 p.m. Then for 
the Northern Division, Archbishop 
Carroll vs. Cardinal O'Hara at 3:30 
p.m. Also tomorrow, the Public League 
finalists will be found at the conclusion 
of the Public League playoff double- 
header at Northeast when Frankford 
meets Central at 10:30 a.m. and Bar- 
tram meets Northeast at 1:30 p.m. 

• In other high school action it was: 
C.B. West 9, Souderton 6 
Pennridge 34, Wissahickon 7 
Kennedy 20, Bristol 
Lansdale Catholic 28, Pottstown 
Norristown 27, North Penn 16 

♦Neshaminy 17, Pennsbury 14 
Bensalem 19, Truman 18 
Quakertown 14, Upper Merion 7 
Penn Charter 28, Germantown A. 18 
(100th Anniversary) 



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February 2 • 8, 
1987 



1962 JonDouglM 

1963 Whitney Ased 

1964 Chuck McKlnley 
1966 CMUmPhmI 

1966 Cnerlss Paearell 

1967 Arthur Ashe 
1966 Msnuel Santana 
1966 Rodlaver 

1970 RodLaver 

1971 John Newcontbe 

1972 RodLaver 

1973 Stan Smith 



1974 RodLaver 

1976 Marty RIeesen 

1976 Jimmy Connora 

1977 Otck Stockton 

1978 Jtmmy Connora 
197V Jimmy Connor* 

1960 Jimmy Connora 

1961 Roscos Tenner 

1962 JohnMcEnroe 

1963 John McEnroe 

1964 John McEnroe 
IMS John McEnroe 
1966 feanlendl 



W1WI7 



6DBnf)Sb 



Box Seat Information 



i $225 par aaat 
($25 tax deductible) available tor the seven day, 
eight day, eight seeeion aerie* ONLY 
Section* E. F, Q, H, I, R, S, T. U, V, Row* 1-21. 
Note: Anyone who wtehea to be seated In the nrat 
five row* (temporary sssts) for the aecood 
four sessions, era be aaaled In accord wtth 
their aatectlon for the rVat four aeeelone in 

a) Flrat eight row* D, J, Q. W 

b) Firart five row* C, K, P, X 
Stive* Patron tax Seat* • $200 per aeet 
Available tor the aeven day. eight aeeelon 
aerie* ONLY. 

Section* D.J,Q.W, Row* 8-21. 

QoM Patron Seat Holder* Bonus! Receive an 
invitation to attend the Jenoary 28 gal* preview 
opening of "TenrHe-in-Art XVI". 

Cnc/udea wee* long mambersrMp at Overton* the 
Spectrum* private dining club AND your namt 
(rated In H» hendaome tournament program boo* 
for a* Sox Seat hoMar* 

A Urmted number of w eekend pacnagee are avail- 
able • $140 par aaat For information, can the 
Tournament Office, 215-947-2530 



Lrum 



February 2-8, 
1967 

D *Oo4d Patron 6k» Seats 

available »$225 per seet 
($25 tax deduct Wei 
Secttone E. f. G. H, I, R. 
S,T,U,V 
1-21 for 8 i 
ONLY 



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Sports Quiz 

QUESTION #11: 

In 1980, the Philadelphia Eagles 
made It to the Super Bowl for the 
first time In a long time, but lost to 
the Oakland Raiders 27-10. That 
year Wllbert Montgomery had a year 
only some backs dream of, can you 
name the Eagles offensive line that 
opened those gaping holes for Wll- 
bert In the 1980 season? 

No one got the week *9 question: A 
pair of young forwards were the two top 
scorers in the ABA in 1972-73. Both left 
college with eligibility remaining in order 
to turn pro. One was Julius Erving of the 
University of Massachusetts and the Vir- 
ginia Squires who scored 31.9 points per 
game in 1972-73 to top the ABA. Who 
was runner-up? (Hint: He was a team- 
mate of Doc's in the middle to late 70's.) 
Answer: George McGinnis, who averaged 
27.6/game and spent just one season at 
Indiana University. 

If you think you know the answer to 
this week's question, just put your name, 
box # and answer on a slip of paper and 
put it into box 951. If your correct an- 
swer is drawn you'll win a free meal. You 
can't win if you don't play. 



P-Whitemarsh 14, Methacton 9 
Springfield 10, Upper Moreland 7 
William Tennent 19, Council Rock 
Penn Wood 28, Unionville 
Hatboro-Horsham 35, L. Moreland 14 
Abington 42, Cheltenham 
C.B. East 21, Coatesville 7 
North Carolina heads Associated Press 
preseason college basketball poll. Fin- 
ishing out the top five are Louisville, 
Indiana, Purdue and Nevada Las 
Vegas. 




Football standings 

(Through Friday) 

PUBLIC League 

North Dfviaion W L T 

a Northeast 5 1 

Frankford 5 1 

Washington 4 1 1 

Lincoln 3 3 

ML. King 2 3 1 

Olney 1 5 

Mastbaum 6 

x -clinched div 

League 

Mid-City Divi sion W L T 

x Central 5 

Dobbins 3 2 

Roxborough 2 2 1 

Germantown 2 2 1 

Grau 2 3 

Edison 5 

x-clinched div 

League 

West Division W LT 

x Bartram 5 1 

Franklin 3 1 2 

Bok 3 1 2 

Southern 3 2 1 

West Phila 3 3 

University City 1 4 1 

Overbrook 6 

x-clincrted drv. 

CATHOLIC League 

Northern Division W L T 

Bishop Egan 6 1 1 

Bishop McDevitt 6 2 

Father Judg-j 5 2 1 

Arch. Wood 5 3 

Arch. Ryan 4 4 

Card. Dougherty 4 4 

North Cath 3 5 




I 

x St. James 6 

St. Joseph's 5 2 

Arch. Carroll 4 3 

Card. O'Hara 4 3 

Msgr. Bonner 3 3 1 

St. J. Neumann 3 4 

West Catholic 2 4 1 

Roman Catholic 7 

x -clinched dfv 



Overall 
W L T 



6 
6 
5 
3 
3 
1 
1 



2 
2 
1 
4 
5 
7 
6 





1 
1 
1 





Overall 
W L T 



7 
4 
4 
2 
4 






1 
1 






Overall 
W L T 



7 
5 
3 

4 
4 
2 




2 
1 
1 
1 




Overall 
W L T 



6 
6 
5 

5 
4 
4 
3 



1 


1 










..170 
..170 


1 8 
1 8 


Southern Division 


League 
W L T 


Overall 

WIT 



7 
6 
6 
6 
5 
3 
4 








1 


1 




* AEROBICS • 

EVERY MONDAY AND 

WEDNESDAY IN ALL-PURPOSE 

ROOM FROM 4:15-5:45 P.M. 

Come, get in shape 

and bring a friend! 

Be prompt! 



DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 



DVC MEN'S BASKETBALL '86'87: 
CONSISTENCY ON OFFENSE AND DEFENSE IS BIG KEY 




1986-87 



by John Litzke 

Head coach Bill Werkiser takes a strong 
team with an even mix of rookies and 
veterans into the 1986 DVC men's bas- 
ketball season. 

Coach Werkiser is in his second season 
as head coach at DVC after coming over 
from a very successful program at Norris- 
town H.S. "Our practices have been go- 
ing well, everybody is getting anxious to 
start the season and we're gelling together 
as a unit, so I'm pleased," commented 
Werkiser. "Our scrimmages will answer a 
lot of things," continued Werkiser. Things 
that need to be answered are, who will 
start at point guard? Will the new three- 
point shot be to the advantage of DVC's 
hot outside shooting? And, will DVC 
play a consistent offense and defense 
throughout the season? This is one of 
coach Werkiser's major concerns coming 
off the 4-20 season of 1985-86. 

The strength that coach Werkiser talked 
about was the team's experience and the 
weaknesses which need to be worked on 
were with turnovers, fouling and execu- 
tion. If these facets of the game can be 
worked out, look for a strong showing by 
the 1986-87 squad. 

DVC has added a J.V. team due to 
the increased number of recruits this sea- 
son. The J.V. schedule includes 17 
games and will serve as the farm club of 
the Varsity. The J.V. will be coached by 
Mark Werkiser. 

The rest of the league has gotten a bit 
weaker, but nothing really to call home 
about. The MAC remains one of the 
toughest divisions in Division III with the 
pre-season favorites being Scranton, 
Kings and Muhlenberg. DVC begins their 
season tonight vs. Cabrini away. We 
wish them much success. 

Dwight Weldon— Dwight is a 6-2 
sophomore forward from Wissahickon 
H.S. in Ambler, PA. Dwight has one of 
the most consistent and deadly shots 
around. With that shot Dwight made 
120 of 239 shots in '85-'86 at an average 
of 13.7/game and also led the team in 
rebounds with 107. Dwight played in 22 
games last season and should play a big 
role in '86-'87. 

John Boone— John is a 6-6 junior 
center from Olney H.S. in Philadelphia. 
In the 12 games he played last season, 
John averaged 8.6 points per game and 
five rebounds. John is essential to the 
success of this year's team with his inside 
work and rebounding. 

Bryan Haskins— Smooth is a 6-1 ju- 
nior guard/forward out of a fine Ben 
Franklin H.S. basketball program and 
lives in Philadelphia. In '85-'86, Smooth 
played in 23 games hitting 62 of 155 
shots for a 6.9 avg./game. He finished 
with 21 assists, 20 steals and 40 rebounds 
and will either come off of the bench or 
start for DVC this season. 

Joe Cherry— Joe is a 6-3 sophomore 
forward out of Cheltenham H.S. in 
Cheltenham, PA. Joe's play really took a 
step up last season and contributed in a 
big way. Last season, Joe averaged 7.6 
points on 59 of 123 shooting. His shoot- 
ing and defensive skills are a real plus for 
the team and he should see a lot of action. 



Joe Butte— Joe is a 6-1 sophomore 
guard out of Overbrook H.S. in Philadel- 
phia. Towards the beginning of the sea- 
son Joe wasn't seeing much playing time 
but towards mid-season that all changed. 
When inserted into the starting lineup, 
Joe did the job of a seasoned veteran. 
He averaged 8.7 points/game in 23 
games, 71 assists, 28 steals and 57 re- 
bounds were his other totals. He's duel- 
ing for the starting point guard spot and 
should have a strong season. 



James Dudley— James is a 64 soph- 
omore forward/center out of Bartram 
H.S. in Philadelphia. James will play an 
important role as backup center this sea- 
son and should see his share of playing 
time. His size should help on the boards 
when the banging gets heavy underneath. 
James averaged 2.9/game in 17 games 
last season. 

Eric Ford— Eric is a 5-6 junior guard 
out of Penn Wood H.S. in Philadelphia. 
Last season Eric averaged 11.5 points/ 




MEN'S BASKETBALL 


WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 


NOVEMBER 






NOVEMBER 






FRI 21 CABRINI 


A 


8 00 PM 


FRI 28 GALLAUDET TOURNAMENT 


A 


6 00 PM 


SAT 22 BEAVER 


A 


3 30 PM 


SAT 29 GALLAUDET TOURNAMENT 


A 


2 00 PM 


TUE 25 EASTERN 


A 


8 00 PM 








SAT 29 URSINUS 


A 


7 30 PM 


DECEMBER 












TUE 2 UPSALA 


H 


700 PM 


DECEMBER 






THU 4 DREW 


A 


7 30 PM 


MON 1 KINGS 


H 


8 00 PM 


SAT 6 MISERICORDIA 


H 


2 00 PM 


WED 3 FDU MADISON 


A 


8 00 PM 


MON 8 MORAVIAN 


H 


7 00 PM 


SAT 6 DREW 


A 


730 PM 


WED 10 SCRANTON 


H 


7 00 PM 


TUE 9 ELIZABETHTOWN 


H 


8 00 PM 


JANUARY 






JANUARY 






THU 8 ALBRIGHT 


A 


700 PM 


THU 8 ALBRIGHT 


H 


8 00 PM 


SAT 10 WILKES 


H 


6 00 PM 


SAT 10 WILKES 


A 


8 00 PM 


TUE 13 CABRINI 


H 


7 00 PM 


THU 15 CATHOLIC 


H 


800 PM 


SAT 17 ALLENTOWN 


H 


600 PM 


SAT 17 ALLENTOWN 


H 


8 00 PM 


TUE 20 KINGS 


A 


7 00 PM 


MON 19 MUHLENBERG 


H 


800 PM 


THU 22 DREW 


H 


700 PM 


FRI 23 SUSQUEHANNA 


A 


8 00 PM 


SAT 24 LEBANON VALLEY 


H 


2 00 PM 


SAT 24 JUNIATA 


A 


7:30 PM 


MON 26 CEDAR CREST 


H 


600 PM 


MON 26 MORAVIAN 


H 


8 00 PM 


TUE 27 ST ELIZABETH 


A 


7 00 PM 


WED 28 SCRANTON 


H 


8.00 PM 


THU 29 WIDENER 


A 


7 00 PM 


SAT 31 WILKES 


H 


8A0PM 


SAT 31 FDU MADISON 


A 


7 30 PM 


FEBRUARY 






FEBRUARY 






MON 2 SPRING GARDEN 


A 


8 00 PM 


MON 2 SPRING GAROEN 


A 


6 00 PM 


WED 4 SCRANTON 


A 


8 15 PM 


WED 4 SCRANTON 


A 


6 15 PM 


SAT 7 MESSIAH 


A 


8 00 PM 


MON 9 KINGS 


H 


7 00 PM 


WED 11 FDU MADISON 


H 


800 PM 


WED 11 FDU MADISON 


H 


6 00 PM 


SAT 14 KINGS 


A 


800 PM 


SAT 14 LYCOMING 


A 


2 00 PM 


WED 18 LYCOMING 


H 


8:00 PM 


MON 16 UPSALA 


A 


7 00 PM 


SAT 21 DREW 


H 


200 PM 


HEAD COACH: GARY PENTO 






HEAD COACH: BILL WERKISER 













game on 115 of 240 shooting to make 
him second to Dwight in scoring. Eric, 
the quarterback of the team last season, 
is fighting for the point guard spot this 
season. Eric led the '85-'86 team in assists 
with 93 and in steals with 51. Eric uses 
his size and quickness to his advantage 
and will kill 'ya with his jumper. 

John Wlorek— John is a 6-4 sopho- 
more center from Hudbinge H.S. in 
Stockholm, Sweden. John played spar- 
ingly last season for coach Werkiser. 
With that one season under his belt, 
John should see increased playing time 
this season. He is a hard worker and very 
aggressive on the boards. 

Mark Spotts— Mark is a 6-5 junior 
forward center out of Carlisle H.S. in 
Carlisle, PA. Mark was felled by what 
was thought to be a career-ending knee 
injury towards the end of last season but 
has made a steady recovery and plans to 
return to the team after the Christmas 
break. In the 18 games he played last 
season, Mark averaged 2.7 points/game 
and had 52 rebounds. Mark is also a 
veteran of the MAC and should add the 
size and experience needed this season. 

The top freshmen who should see ac- 
tion on the Varsity team this year are: 

Gene Blanker— Gene is a 6-5 center/ 
forward out of St. John Neumann H.S. 
in Philadelphia. Gene should strengthen 
front court and rebounding. 

John Jones— John is a 6-3 forward 
out of Cardinal Dougherty in Philadel- 
phia. He is a prolific scorer and should 
add some real punch to the DVC offense. 

Mike Sutrynowicz— Mike is a 6-3 
forward from Cheltenham H.S. 

Jeff Bobb— Jeff is a 6-4 forward from 
Unionville H.S. 

Daiyll Mlnggia— Daryll is a 5-9 guard 
out of Reading H.S. Daryll has good ball 
handling skills and a nice outside shot. 
He should help in a backup role. 



Cross Country Update 
REGIONAL MEET 

On Saturday, November 15, the Har- 
riers of DVC traveled to Allentown Col- 
lege to participate in the Division III 
Regional Cross Country Meet. This was 
the last meet of the season for the team. 
During this meet the team not only ran 
against Middle Atlantic colleges, but they 
also competed against other eastern Divi- 
sion III colleges that were not in the MAC 
conference. 

The weather for the race was brisk 
with temperatures in the low 40's. The 
course became slick as the frozen ground 
thawed. This proved to be hazardous for 
some runners as they slipped and fell 
while going around rums. 

Overall the Harriers finished 19th out 
of 24 teams. Individually, David Spotts 
was 1st across the line for DVC finishing 
25th overall. Gary Kampmyer, Jim 
Enoch, John Thompson and Tom A wait 
round out the rest of the team's scoring 
top five. Tony Donifrio and Bill Brosky 
finished 6th and 7th for the team. 

The team finished the season with a 
disappointing 5-6 record. 



HELP WANTED! 

$60 per hundred paid 
for remailing letters from home! 

Send self -addressed, 

stamped envelope for 

information/application to: 

ASSOCIATES 
Box 95-B, Rosalie, NJ 07203 



DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL: 
LADIES SHOOTING FOR THE TOP IN TOUGH MAC 







1986-87 

by John Litzke 

Unity and hard work were the two 
philosophies stressed by DVC's women's 
head basketball coach Gary Pento that 
were of significant importance as we 
head into yet another season of DVC 
lady Aggie basketball. 

"There are no individual stars on this 
team and there are no team goals," com- 
mented coach Pento. "If this team can 
stick together as a unit and play as a unit 
we will be competitive." 

Coach Pento hopes his team can im- 
prove on their 1985-86 record of 10-13 
overall, 3-7 in the MAC and he's got the 
firepower to do it, although his team's 
height and rebounding ability are major 
concerns. The MAC happens to be the 
toughest conference in Division III with 
Scranton already picked as the pre- 
season favorite. Kings College and Far- 
leigh-Dickinson will also be very strong in 
'86-'87. With his lineup this season, Pen- 
to plans to do many of the same things 
as he did last season. He would like to 
continue pressing on defense, fast break 
as often as possible and not have to run a 
set offense a majority of the time. 

The strengths of the women's team lie 
in their pressing, multiple defenses, fast 
break and their outside shot. "I have a 
few girls (like Darcell Estep, Lisa Long 
and newcomers Laura Rotz, Michele Shirk 
and Stacy Yoder) who can really shoot 
the outside shot well," said coach Pento. 
The weakness of this team are few but 
the few are pretty big. Pento would like 
to see the turnovers decrease from last 
year and watch more of the fundamentals 
exude from each of the ladies. Rebound- 
ing strength needs to be developed more 
and more if DVC is to compete success- 
fully in "the land of the sycamores" called 
the MAC. "We're a small team and that's 
my major concern right now. But if we 
play smart on the boards, box out and 
get position we should be alright." 

Pento has lost the services of some 
key starters from last year. Last season's 
high scorer, Mary Jo Bush has transfer- 
red, Kim Frey and Randi Kunkel are pur- 
suing alternate activities and Michele 
Heffner was lost to graduation . But with 
this new crop of freshmen and a balance 
of seasoned veterans, DVC wi'l be ready 
and waiting to take on the monster of the 
MAC. 

The 1986-87 lady Aggies shape up 
this way: 

Darcell Estep— Darcell is a 5-7 senior 
guard/forward out of Annapolis H.S. in 
Annapolis, MD. Fifi averaged 8.0 points/ 
game in '85-'86 and played in 23 of 24 
games. She was the team leader in assists 
and a virtuoso in the passing depart- 
ment. Fifi won the Coach's Award in 
'85-'86 and was the team MVP in '84- 
'85. Fifi's leadership, experience and 
scoring ability are crucial in the upcoming 
season. 

Lisa Long— Lisa is a 5-8 junior for- 
ward from C.B. East H.S. and lives in 
Doylestown, PA. Lisa, a veteran of the 
team, is a consistent and valuable role 
player. Last season she averaged 4.8 
points/game, had 111 rebounds which 
was second on the team and had the 
third highest free-throw percentage on 
the team As a freshman, Lisa received 



the Coach's Award and as a sophomore 
she received the honor of Best Defensive 
Player. 
Sharon Chapman— Sharon is a 5-4 

junior guard out o( Martin Luther King 
H.S. in Philadelphia. Sharon will be a 
backup point guard and shooting guard 
coming off of the bench. Her jumping 
and ball handling have improved signifi- 
cantly and she should strengthen the 
front court. 

Etta Smith— Etta is a 5-4 junior guard 
out of Frank H. Morriel H.S. and lives in 
Newark, NJ. Last season Etta was used 
as a role player but this season her job 
will be greater as she will be the backup 
point guard. Her ball handling skills have 
greatly improved and she is an outstand- 
ing defensive player. She has been re- 
garded as the most improved player re- 
turning to this year's team. Etta won the 
award for Best Defensive Player last sea- 
son and her attitude is team -oriented and 
very positive. 

Patricia Dollarton— Trish is a 5-11 
sophomore center out of Bishop Kenrick 
H.S. in Norristown, PA. Trish, in '85- 
'86, averaged 4.1 points/game in 22 
games and hauled down a total of 78 re- 
bounds. Trish is regarded as the strongest 
rebounder on the team and that will be 
her role this season along with scoring in 
the paint. Trish also has the knack for 
drawing the- foul. She adds a lot of life 
and enthusiasm to the team and to just 
about anything she does and that can 
only come as an asset. 

Personals 

R.M. & J.F. — Tell the thing in the cor- 
ner to shut the lights out! 

J.F. — Move the covers so you don't 
suffocate. 

To Mark, Dave and Clay — Sexy under- 
wear guys! 

R.M. — Who you gonna call? Ghost 
busters. 

Hey E.T. — Time to get up! 

Chipmunk — That was real cute. Sorry 
to hear that trout season has closed. 
Don't worry there's plenty of fish in the 
sea. Even though all yours keep swim- 
ming away from the main pond (DVC) . 
Don't worry sooner or later one has to 
stick around. They can't all transfer; can 
they? Your Roomie 

Stanley — He was looking good playing 
football. No shirt either. Oooops. 

Diane — What did you get on that test 
you studied so hard for? 

Norton — You and ripped can have a 
deep conversation. 

Marvin — You were gone for four nights 
and I didn't even get a chance to take ad- 
vantage of it. 

Seymour and I slept together Saturday 
night. Art 

Boz — Ford, what a finely constructed 
automobile. 

Boz - AND Y HOWER YOU DOING? 
Boz — If 1 buy a pizza will you help me 
eat it, preferably at the Ag Building. 
God — Where's the coolers 
Wags — Do you dance on tables much 
or just when you want to impress the 
sexy ladies? 

Woot — You're a wild woman on the 
dance floor — even better on the video 
machine. 

Wayne — I don't believe you stole my 
girlfriend! 

Regina — This one is for you! 

Joe P. — Hey did those comments get 
you — probably not. You filthy scumbag! 



Laura Rotz— Laura is a 5-8 freshman 
guard from St. Huberts H.S. in Philadel- 
phia. Laura was very highly recruited out 
of St. Huberts where she averaged 15 
points, six rebounds and eight assists her 
senior year. She was voted Most Athletic 
at St. Huberts, All-Catholic first team, 
Daily News All-Star and Neius Gleaner 
Player of the Year. Laura is dedicated 
and a very hard worker. She is a proven 
shooter and will play a big role this sea- 
son as she will be a starter at the shooting 
guard position. 

Michele Shirk -Michele is a 5-10 
freshman center/forward out of North 
Lebanon H.S. in Fredricksburg, PA. 
Michele's credentials are quite extensive 
including North Lebanon H.S. Female 
Athlete of the Year, Lebanon County 
first team All-Star, Lebanon -Lancaster 
County first team All-Star, Member of 
Big 15 Round Ball Classic-West Team 
and an 1100 point scorer. She scored 
560 points in her senior year averaging 
19.5/game, 11 rebounds and four as- 
sists. Michele has been regarded as the 
most promising freshman recruit and 
hope her massive scoring continues. 

Tammy Petraskle— Tammy is a 5-9 
sophomore forward out of Shikellamy 
H.S. and is from Sunbury, PA. In '85- 
'86, Tammy scored 245 points which 
was a high for the team and averaged 
11.1 points/game. Tammy can be seen 
pounding the boards in '86- '87 (95 re- 
Compound W — We know who you are 
and we're coming after you now! 

The Pumpkin Gang 

Wayne — Nice literature Jugs 

Daryl — No matter what you .say I'll kill 

you in quarters any day. I think you're 

blowing bubbles. 

Chris A. — I heard that you were boo- 

booed on Friday night. Is it true? 

Chris A. — You were getting nasty on 

Friday night. 

John — You name the place and the 

time and I will be there. 

Joell — O well, learn to live with it. 

Jamie — Is the rumor true? Remember 
pay backs are a B ---! 
Amy — What is that on your neck? 
Spike you ins — Is that right? 

Junior Farmer — There is a vacancy at 
the hotel. $5.00 a night. 

Super 7 — Look . . . The giant penguin! 
We're on a mission from God. Yeah right! 

Norton 

Seymour — Only one beer & Lucus. 
Yeah so what are you trying to say? 

Norton 

Barney — Goo-goo-ca-choo-oh-poo! 

Norton 
Art — How about the man with the ta- 
lented tongue! Norton 
Stanley — How about the sexual ESP! 

Norton 

Art & Seymour - P2T1 Norton 

Art & Stanley — You've got to show me 
and Seymour how to flirt. Norton 

EEEWWWAAANNN . . . 
EEEWWWAAANNN . . . 
EEEWWWAAANNN . . . Norton 

Seymour — Come on ... I want to go 
on the "Great EWAAN Adventure" 

Norton 

STOWOP - Norton 
Yo Art & Seymour — You swintches! 

Norton 

Wilbert — Thanks for the B-Q'd potato 
chips. They sure were good! 

Seymour, Art and Norton 



bounds in '85- '86) and scoring in the 
paint. At Shikellamy, she was a 1000- 
point scorer and was named Athlete of 
the Year in her senior year. 

Rhonda Hill— Rhonda is a 5-7 fresh- 
man guard/forward out of University Ci- 
ty H.S. in Philadelphia. She comes out 
of a good basketball program in Univer- 
sity City and could be a pleasant surprise 
in the scoring department. Rhonda has a 
lot of natural talent but needs to learn 
more of the fundamentals. She'll be a 
real asset on the DVC bench. 

Stacy Yoder— Stacy is a 5-8 fresh- 
man guard from Shikellamy H.S. and is 
from Sunbury, PA. In her senior year at 
Shikellamy, she was honored as Female 
Athlete of the Year and third team All- 
Athracite. As a senior she averaged 16 
points/game, four rebounds and led the 
league in average assists/game with 11. 
She is a real hard worker and the words 
"hustle" and "scrapper" would describe 
her type of play. 

Victoria Blazejewski— Vickie is a 
6-1 freshman center from W.B. Saul 
H.S. in Philadelphia. Vickie didn't play 
basketball in H.S. but earned her basket- 
ball reputation through CYO basketball 
(Catholic Youth Organization) and aver- 
aged 13 points, 11 rebounds and three 
assists. Her height is a big plus. inside 
when it comes to rebounding and scoring 
and her attitude couldn't be any better. 

Frank — I love you . Beth 

Frank — You're ugly and your mother 
dresses you funny. Carol 

Boz — Has it come up yet? 

Boz — Have I got the prescription for you. 

Doc 

Boz — I think you know what would be 
really really cute. I know I do. 

Michelle — Are you a transformer or 
what? 

Hank — Knock at girls much? There's a 
name for guys like you. 

Jill, Rynda and Liza — Congratulations 
on your first place at the show! Jim 

Eric — Have you ever considered a career 
as a referee in boxing? Drago 

Brooke, Jay, Ed, Chuck and Margaret — 
We would make great Ghostbusters! 
Huh? From the Bravest One-Sure! 

MLO — You're the sweetest. Remember 
10/18/86 and 11/7/86. From the one 
who wears Stetson! 

Dave — Why did you have a big smile 
on your face Sunday morning? 

Are you "happy?" 

Carmen — I'd rather be with the guy 

who's in my room! You owe me a new 

headlight! 

Sean — Try not to blow up the Chem 

Lab this week! Your Partner 

The Super 7 — Well girls there is no 

more VCR, no more MAN and no more 

KEGS! The worst thing is that no VCR 

means no more FLICKS! We'll just have 

to make our own! 

"IOU" everything in the world! 

Jay — I told you that you should've got- 
ten Tracy. She put you in the doghouse 
for not getting her to watch the movies 
with us. When are we going to play 
POKER and do shots of Yukon again? 
I will miss you over Thanksgiving and 
Christmas break! Jim 




BDsflaw^aims^MIlfiSf ©sflflo®® 



Vol. XXI, No. 13 

Monday, December 8, 1986 




1986 

SPORTS 

FINAL 

Santa Lines 
coming soon! 



NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



C.P.A. WILL SPEAK ON TAX REFORM ACT 



Walter M. Shea, a Certified Public Ac- 
countant from Langhorne, Pa., will speak 
on the impact of the new Tax Reform Act 
on the small business, Wednesday, Dec. 
10, from noon until 1 p.m. 

The Luncheon Seminar, sponsored 
by DVC and the Caritas Institute, will be 
held in the Coffee House of the Student 
Center. Included in the ticket price of $6 
per person is a soup-and-sandwich lunch. 

Seating is limited to the first 50 reser- 
vations, which can be made by calling 
the college's Business Division, 345-1500, 
extension 2213, by Dec. 8. 

Walter Shea, an individual CPA prac- 
titioner, has had tenure with the Internal 
Revenue Service, as well as with the 
Educational Testing Service and as lec- 
turer for Elmira College. He holds mem- 
bership in state and national institutes of 
CPAs, the AICPA Examination Commit- 
tee, the Lower Bucks Chamber of Com- 
merce and the United Way Planning and 

Bloodmobile 
Surpasses Goal! 

Everyone who participated in the No- 
vember 18th blood drive deserves a sin- 
cere thank you and the community's 
gratitude, from those who worked so 
hard to recruit donors, to those who 
were turned away for medical reasons 
and to those who successfully donated. 
We surpassed our institutional goal of 
150 pints and ended up collecting 193 
pints of blood. 

Below are the total class tallies of 
potential donors: 

Class of 1987 - 33 
Class of 1988 - 38 
Class of 1989 - 35 
Class of 1990 60 

Administration 
Faculty & Staff 
Congratulations goes out to the fresh- 
men class for doing such a superb job. 

Clair Thompson, R.A. on Wolfsohn 
Hall, was the winner for recruiting the 
highest number of potential donors on 
his floor. 

Our next bloodmobile is scheduled for 
February . . . Hope to see you there! 



- 27 




Allocation committees. His interests and 
experience have made him knowledge- 
able in the area of the current tax reform 
measures, about which he will speak at 
the seminar. 

The Caritas Institute at DVC was 
founded this fall, with the purpose of 
promoting the concepts of free enter- 
prise, free market and personal freedom 
through a series of seminars, symposia 
and workshops at the college. 

The institute at the college is designed 
to function as the educational arm of the 
Caritas Foundation, which was founded 
in 1985 for the advancement of the free 
market system, limiting governmental in- 
roads into that system and assuring per- 
sonal freedoms. The non-profit, tax- 
exempt organization is the brainchild of 
Wayne, Pa. resident Dominic Toscani, 
owner of Paris Business Forms Inc., 
Burlington, NJ. 



Winners of Deep Run Scholarship, $1,000 each 
— Gregory Mattern with Gene Fkkes, President of 
Deep Run Packing and Trustee 

Photo/DVC Public Info 



Talk On Terrorism To Be 
Held Wednesday At DVC 

Hillel of DVC presents Joe Pudder, 
ex-Israeli Commando, on "Terrorism: 
The Undeclared War Which Threatens 
the Survival of Western Civilization," 
Wednesday, Dec. 10 at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Ail-Purpose Room of the Student Center. 

Mr. Pudder has served on several 
presidential commissions and has been a 
coordinator of youth affairs for B'nai 
B'rith Division 3. 

For information call 345-1500, ext. 
X2387. 



THE ENVELOPE PLEASE... 

Trip for two to Florida lucky win* 
ners: On Thursday evening, Nov. 20, 
a number of students showed up at 
Caesar's Pub with suitcases, duffle bags, 
etc., in anticipation of winning the all- 
expense paid weekend trip for two to 
Florida. 

At midnight, the music stopped, thf.* 
lights went on and the drawing of the 
lucky ticket took place. 

The winner, we are proud to an- 
nounce, is Laura Chudowski '90 who 
resides in Miller Hall. Laura seemed a lit- 
tle stunned by the announcement but did 
assure everyone that she and her guest 
would be on the plane the following 
morning. 

That evening's Pub included the usual 
non-alcoholic beverages and music by 
Tom Walsh; also featured was "Saturday 
Night Live" comedian Frankie Pace. By 
all indications he was a big hit here at 
DVC with a standing-room-only crowd! 

Prior to the opening of the Pub that 
night, another drawing took place at the 
Thanksgiving Dinner in the Cafeteria . . . 

Color TV winner: The Residence 
Life Office in cooperation with DVC 
R.A.'s raffled off a 13" color television 
set; the winner of that drawing was Gene 









:law*~ 








if 


TOt 


/A' '.EO 


?*^^ r 




. 'MB 




4 


^j^ . *, ^4 




f 

f 

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Winners of the Tri-State Dairy-Dell Scholarship*, $500 $1,000 each - Back row, left to right: Curt 
Wengert. Robert Sauer, Jr. . Peter Gollmer, Gregory Mattern. Front row. left to right: Peter VlHari, President of 
TriState Dairy-Deli Assoc.. Jennifer Jesiolowski and Annmarie Whitesell Photo DVC Public Info 





Winners of World Flavors Scholarships, $1,000 each 
Thomas Holmquist 78. Vice President of World Flavors. Inc 



FILLY DONATED TO DVC 

Animal Husbandry has received a 
donation of the three-year-old Standard- 
bred filly "Tobasco Sauce" from Leo 
Wetter and William Martin of New York. 

Fred Hofsaess reports that she will be 
bred next spring. Her sire is "Sonsam," 
who commands a stud fee of $40,000. 

This is a valuable gift to the college's 
Equine program, and much appreciated. 



Carl Schuchardt and Sandra Zimmie with 
Photo/DVC Public Info 



Bloemker '90, who resides at Wolfsohn 
7. 

Snack Bar Pepsi-Cola Sponsored 
Raffle Winners: Last Friday, Nov. 21, 
Dean Robert Tasker came down to draw 
the three tickets for the long-running 
Panasonic "boom box," personal radio, 
mug set raffle winners. Many commuters 
who frequent the Snack Bar were sure 
that they would be the ones to win, since 
they had received so many tickets for 
buying the specials-of-the-day for weeks. 
Many of us were disappointed, but some- 
body had to win! 

The lucky players were: Pam Estadt of 
Chalfont, who won the Panasonic "boom 
box;" Jane Bauer of Warrington, who 
won the Panasonic personal radio; and 
Dawnmarie Richard, of DVC, who won 
the set of pottery mugs. Two weeks be- 
fore this drawing, Dean Tasker was res- 
ponsible for drawing the three winning 
tickets for the three free cases of Slice 
soda, and again, he got three female 
winners: Kathleen M. Butler of Warring- 
ton, Lisa Castagnolo of Warrington and 
Natalie Bitto of Chalfont. Seems a little 
fishy . . . was there a female Warrington - 
Chalfont connection conspiracy to rig the 
drawing — or to influence Dean Tasker? 
According to the Dean of Students, it is 
all pure coincidence. Hmmm. 



This Week on 
Campus 



by W.H.R. 

^ FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5 ^ 

Feeling Hke a kid again? Treat yourself 
to that childhood favorite Jock and the 
Beanstalk, a DVC drama, starting at 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6 

Still didn't make it to Jack and the 

"* BeamtaM You can catch tt 7:30 p.m. * 

in the Coffeehouse. InvHe a friend! 

WBB (H) vs. Misericordia, 2 p.m. 

MBB (A) vs Drew, 7:30 p.m. 

* Wrestling (A) York Spartan Touma- * 
ment, 10:30 a.m. 

SUNDAY. DECEMBER 7 

Get into that holiday spirit with songs 
from DVC Band and Chorale at the 
Annual Christmas Dinner/Concert to 

MONDAY, DECEMBER 8 

WBB (H) vs. Moravian, 7 p.m. 

* TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9 * 

MBB (H) vs. EHzabethrown, 8 p.m 
^ WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10 ^ 

Hillel sponsors speaker on World Ter- 
rorism, 7:30 p.m., APR 

» Wrestfcng (A) vs. Swarthmore/ .jl. 

w Delaware State 

WBB (H) vs. Scranton, 7 p.m. 

4> THURSDAY. DECEMBER 11 * 

No more classes!! But catch up on afi 
quizzes and exams today, Reading 

* ^ * 
Campus Films presents Target, 9 p.m. 

in the APR. 



FRIDAY. DECEMBER 12 



Final exams begin . 
Dec 20) 

SATURDAY. DECEMBER 13 

Semi-Formal Dinner Dance In 
APR 



(and end on 





p°Ri 




WmK£ - U P 



Sports Trivia Winner 

Congratulations to Alan Cohen for 
correctly answering trivia question *10 
which was: "Who am I in the NFL?" 

"I was an all-pro wide receiver for the 
Kansas City Chiefs and an integral part 
of the Chiefs Super Bowl years. I stand 
6-3 and weigh 215 and I could run like a 
deer and leap like a gazelle. In 1971, I 
gained over 1,000 yards in pass recep- 
tions. I was quarterback Len Dawson's 
favorite target and attended Prairie View 
A&M just outside of Houston." 

Alan's correct answer was Otis Taylor. 
Alan received a coupon for a free meal 
from Caesar's Pub. 

No one got question *11: "In 1980 
the Philadelphia Eagles made it to the 
Super Bowl for the first time in a long 
time but lost to the Oakland Raiders 
27-10. That year Wilbert Montgomery 
had a year only some backs dream of, 
can you name the Eagles offensive line 
that opened those gaping holes for Wil- 
bert in the 1980 season?" 

Answer— Tackles: Stan Walters, Jerry 
Sisemore; Guards: Petey Perot, Woody 
Peoples; Center: Guy Morris. 

Sports Trivia will resume in 1987 and 
remember, you can't win if you don't 
play. 

Two Responses To 
Presidential Question 

Dear Editors, 

As students of DVC, we would like to 
express our opinion concerning the selec 
tion of the college's new president. We 
feel that our new president should have 
no affiliation with our college at the pre- 
sent time. Just as each freshman class 
brings in a "breath of fresh air" we feel an 
outside individual would do the same. 
Our new president should be motivated 
and always willing to lend a hand in col- 
lege activities. He should always be will- 
ing to get involved in bringing out the 
maximum potential of the student body. 
The admiration that this individual pos- 
sesses towards our college is an impor- 
tant factor in electing a candidate for this 
position. This decision is one that should 
be given a great deal of consideration, 
because it determines the future well- 
being of DVC. 

Sincerely, 
Charles E. Baker 
Sophomore, Horticulture 
and David N. Hirtle 
Junior, Agribusiness 

Dem Editors, 

I am a firm believer in promoting from 
"within." An individual who would meet 
all of your qualifications and mine: 

(1) Keen business sense; (2) Experi- 
enced administrator able to deal with 
DVC's special needs; (3) Accepts new 
challenges, makes decisions and stands 
by those decisions; (4) Knowledgeable in 
both business and academic areas; (5) 
Personable, attractive, able to project 
a confident image, is DVC's own Mr. 
George West. 

Sincerely, 
Gayle Siegert '87 



FOR REASONS SCHOLASTIC IN NATURE, 

THE SPORTS COVERAGE YOU DEMAND WILL BE 

CONTINUED NEXT YEAR. HAVE A HOLY JOLLY 

CHRISTMAS AND A SAFE NEW YEAR 

FROM THE DVC SPORTS STAFF. 




• • 



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Personals 

Joe — I'm sorry, I'm sorry, I'm sorry. 
Three strikes, three outs?? — Marie 
Joe — I will love you always! — Marie 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home awoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: Cooler Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

/Area's Best Lunches 11 AM-3 PM 

Happy Hour 4-6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



ADDITION TO WOMEN'S 
BASKETBALL TEAM 

Vickie Mosby— Vickie is a 5-7 center/ 
forward out of Northeast H.S. in Phila- 
delphia. Vickie is in her first year with 
coach Pento's squad but played three 
years at Northeast. She should add re- 
bounding and inside scoring strength 
coming off the bench. 



DVC Dairy Captures Five Of 

Eleven Awards At The 
Bucks County DHIA Banquet 

On Nov. 21, Bucks County held their 
annual meeting of the Dairy Herd Im- 
provement Association. This year the 
DVC dairy received second high herd for 
milk production. Thirty-eight Holstein 
cows averaged 20,883 lbs. of milk for 
their 305 day production record. The 
Holsteins were als< third high herd in 
milkfat production with a 723 pound 
average. 

High producing cow in Bucks County 
was DVC Jemini Astra with 28.907 lbs. 
of milk in 305 days. The lifetime produc- 
tion award for fat was earned by DVC 
Kathleen totaling 9.090 lbs. of fat. 

The DVC dairy was also recognized 
for their Brown Swiss herd as having the 
lowest Somatic Cell Count (a naturally- 
occurring bacteria count) for the year. 

Many thanks go to Paul Knight. Larry 
Morris and the DVC work-study students 
for their hard work and quality labor in 
achieving this recognition for the college. 



FACULTY & STUDENTS 
ATTEND AG FORUM 

John Plummer. John Avery, Mary 
Palumbo and Julian Prundeanu repre- 
sented the college at the 1986 Forum 
"Critical Concerns of U.S. Agriculture," 
presented by the Philadelphia Society for 
Promoting Agriculture. The forum was 
held at the Union League in Philadelphia 
on Nov. 6. 

Also in attendance, as guests of this 
organization, were students Robert Frey, 
Robert Kapka, John Stierly and Jacque- 
line Heflich. 

Speakers included the most respected 
names in agriculture in the country: 
Hood from Penn State, Houck from U. 
of Minnesota, Evenson of Yale, William 
L. Brown from Pioneer Hi-Bred and 
Winston J. Brill of Agracetus. 



STAFF 

Editorsin-Chief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 
Artist Monica Etzweiler 

Reporters Mike Bolles, Missy 

Brangan, Brett Hart, Judy Henry, John 

Nicholson, Melanie O'Neill, Brian 

Taggart, Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry, Anne Shobert, 

Mr Edward O'Brien, 

Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news in the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 






IMtowsMRS Wllkssr ©®flfl<sjg© 



Vol. XXI, No. 14 
Friday, January 23, 1987 



We're back, 

with all the news 

that fits! 




NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



A FRIEND FROM ABROAD TO ATTEND DVC 



by John Litzke 

It is my impression that Americans are 
dumb when it comes to foreign lands 
and foreign cultures, because we are so 
obsessed with our own. 

When a majority of Americans envi- 
sion the "Dark Continent" of Africa, we 
see clans or tribes living in jungles, scanti- 
ly clothed and searching for food; pre- 
slavery and an outdated notion at best! 
The same goes for Egypt and all its an- 
cient history of mummies, sphinxes and 
pyramids; there is little thought of a 
country involved in latter-20th century 
existence. And I would think one addi- 
tional picture of the African continent 
might enter our minds when contem- 
porary issues are brought up — a picture 
that is very understandable: the strife of 
Black Africans in the riot-torn, apartheid- 
diseased country of South Africa; and oil 
and power-crazy Khadafy in Libya. In 
the 80's, Africa is growing like wildfire 
with the rest of the world. 



I spoke with a future member of the 
DVC community last week. Lamin M.K. 
Sagnia is a resident of the smallest coun- 
try on the African continent, the Repub- 
lic of Gambia, which is located in West 
Africa and neighbors the countries of 
Senegal and Nigeria (see map) . The Re- 
public of Gambia has a population of 
900,000 and is 11,000 square kilometers 
in area. Gambia, a commonwealth, has 
a capital, Banjul, its largest city. 

The country is a democratic, capitalist 
nation, governed by a president (elected 
every five years) and a parliament. Gam- 
bia gained its independence, Lamin said, 
from the British in 1965 and has been 
recognized as a Republic since 1970. 

Along with being the smallest of Afri- 
ca's nation, it is also its most peaceful, 
stressed Lamin. Coup d'etats are foreign 
to this country. 

Gambia relies heavily on agriculture 
and its export, with a limited industrial 
economy or development for that mat- 
ter. Livestock such as beef and dairy cat- 



tle are raised and their goods harvested 
and used within the country. Peanuts, 
Gambia's leading cash crop, 90 percent 
of which is exported to Europe and Scan- 
dinavia. Fishing is an important industry 
also. 

Climatically, Gambia is quite dry and 
hot (it is located 50 km. from the epito- 
me of the dry and barren — the Sahara 
Desert)! According to Lamin, Gambia is 
suffering from drought right now. 

Islam is the official Gambian religion. 
People live in towns, in homes much like 
those we live in here, Lamin noted. 
Gambia is divided into five counties. The 
tribe, or clan, is still the main social group 
and Lamin happens to belong to one 
very famous tribe: if anyone recalls the 
book and movie Roots by Alex Haley, 
remember the Mandingo tribe — the tribe 
from which Kunta Kinte originated! Since 
the Moslem religion still allows for multiple 
marriages, Lamin's father has two wives. 
Lamin has four brothers — Baboucarr, 
Sulayman, Noah and Alphe — and two 



sisters, Kaddy and Nyiama, all grown. 

As for Lamin, he enjoys reading, soc- 
cer (he'll be a member of DVC's team 
this fall), basketball and speaking to and 
exchanging ideas with people, especially 
his American friends! 

Lamin will be a welcome addition to 
the DVC community and we wish him 
the best! 




SANTA LINES 
CAME TO TOWN, BUT... 

A slip-up in management of Ram 
Pages transportation, which occurred 
near the end of last semester, resulted in 
no annual Santa Lines issue for 1986. 
The editors regret that this is the first time 
in at least four years that this special issue 
did not find itself on campus. 

Thanks to those who bought the few 
Santa Lines sold; the editors hope that a 
larger Ram Pages staff size will pre- 
vent such an occurrence during VALEN- 
TINE LINES issue publication, which is 
scheduled for February 13. 

Contact John D. Ebert or Bill Rein, 
c/o P.O. Box 988, for refunds of Santa 
Lines purchased last December. We are 
sorry for any inconvenience caused by 
this situation. 



ITS COMING!! 

* THE BOAT SHOW 
* THE FLOWER SHOW 

and the ever popular 
• LIBRARY BOOK SALE 

Thursday, April 9th 



VOICES WANTED 
REWARD: ONE CREDIT 

The DVC Chorale is encouraging all 
students to come and sing this semester. 
Voices are needed in all sections: so- 
prano, alto, tenor and bass. 

One credit can be earned and applied 
to your Liberal Arts credits. Rehearsals 
are heard every Monday and Wednes- 
day during seventh period (beginning at 
4:15 p.m.). 

Lift your spirits and sing your way to 
spring! 



Search for 1988 

Miss Pennsylvania USA 

Now Underway 

Applications are now being accepted 
from all over the Keystone State for the 
annual Miss Pennsylvania USA Pageant 
to be staged this year for the third time in 
Monroeville, Pennsylvania, in the Grand 
Ballroom of the High Rise Howard John- 
son's Hotel on April 3, 4 and 5, 1987. 
The Miss Pennsylvania USA Pageant 
is an official Miss USA-Miss Universe 
Contest. 

There is "NO PERFORMING TAL- 
ENT" requirement, all judging is on the 
basis of poise, personality and beauty of 
face and figure. Entrants who qualify 
must be at least 17 years of age and 
under 25 years of age by February 1, 
1988, never married and at least a six- 
month resident of Pennsylvania, thus 
college dorm students are eligible. All 
girls interested in competing for the title 
must write to: Miss Pennsylvania USA 
Pageant, Tri-State Headquarters, Dept. 
S, 347 Locust Avenue, Washington, PA 
15301-3399 by February 28th. Letters 
must include a recent snapshot, a 
brief biography and phone number. 

Pursuant to the rights granted by Miss 
Universe, Inc., the girl chosen as Miss 
Pennsylvania USA will receive a 14-day 
all-expense paid trip to the site of the 
Miss USA Pageant nationally televised 
on CBS-TV early in 1988, competing for 
over $200,000 in cash and prizes. 
Among her many prizes, the new state 
winner will receive a $1,000 cash schol- 
arship and will select a $1 ,000 wardrobe. 

The new winner will be crowned by 
the current Miss Pennsylvania USA, Lisa 
Rynkiewicz of Larksville, who will be 
present for the entire event at the High 
Rise Howard Johnson's Hotel. 





Library News 

Don't get talked into letting that cute 
high school student take books out on 
your library card. Most of the materials 
in our library are paid for by the tuition 
that YOU pay. They are specially selected 
for you and other college personnel to 
use. When books are removed from the 
library by outsiders they are not on hand 
for you and other legitimate borrowers 
when you need them. 






■ 






This Week on 
Campus 

by Bi Rein 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 23 

Business Club is off on a skiing trip. 
MBB (A) vs. Susquehanna, 8 p.m. 

SATURDAY. JANUARY 24 

MBB (A) vs. Juniata. 7:30 p.m. 
WBB (H) vs. Lebanon Valley, 2 p.m. 
W (A) vs. Lycoming, 7 p.m. 

DAY, JANUARY 26 

MBB (H) vs. Moravian, 8 p.m. 
WBB (H) vs. Cedar Crest, 6 p.m. 
It's basketball season, as you can see. 
So cheer 'era on. 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27 

W (H) vs. Susquehanna, 7 p.m. 
New entertainment: Campus Films 
presents White Nights, 9 p.m. in the 
APR. 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28 

MBB (H) vs Scranton, J.V. 6 p.m 
and V. 8 p.m. 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 29 

A Caesar's Pub to get you out of 

those midwinter blahs, 9 p.m. Be 
there! 

WBB (A) vs, Widener, 7 p.m. 
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30 

DVC is gonna be at the Spectrum. 
Come down and watch the Sixers play 
Chicago Bulb, 7:30 p.m. 




collegiate crossword 




ACROSS 


46 Bandleader Shaw 


12 Set down 


48 Dross 


13 Church projection 


1 Vipers 


49 "A from Hong 


18 Driving places 


5 Despots 


Kong" 


22 finger 


10 FDR's dog 


52 Addictions 


25 Erroll Garner 


14 Sunken fence or 


55 Years: It. 


tune 


laugh 


56 question 


26 Sky-blue 


15 Spartan serf 


58 The Brothers 


27 Scrooge's word 


16 Rush'order abbrevi- 


59 Word in Jane Austen 


29 Concerning 


ation 


title 


animals 


17 Sooner or later 


60 Alliance initials 


30 Misplay 


19 Maui garlands 


61 Sioux 


31 Speed 


20 Healed 


62 Senator Kefauver 


33 Zero-dimensional 


21 Hudson River view 


63 Killed 


figures (abbr. ) 


23 Minerals 




34 What a DH uses, in 


24 In regard to 


DOWN 


sports 


25 " Bank Account" 




36 Study plants 


27 Auction term 


1 Attention-getter 


37 Separate 


28 Stunned 


2 Except 


38 poodle 


32 Suffix for social 


3 Extraordinary occur- 


40 Here 


33 Apartment 


rence 


43 Genie offerings 


34 In front of 


4 Dee 


44 Winged 


35 Tan producer 


5 Fall sounds 


45 Ship rooms 


38 1040, for one 


6 Azov, for one 


47 Succinct 


39 Soldiers 


7 Joyful words to a 


48 Footwear 


40 Something to win 1n 


debtor 


49 Dear one: It. 


cards 


8 Movie Charlie Chan, 


50 "Step !" 


41 Card game 


Winters 


51 Word in the "golden 


42 Gossipy woman 


9 Work with hair 


rule" 


(Yiddish) 


10 Shakespearean 


53 Actress Sharon 


43 Twist 


knight 


54 Street sign 


44 Squirrel treat 


11 On the Tyrrhenian 


57 Half a fly 



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GRE,or MCAT? 

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The Kaplan course teaches test-taking 
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increases the odds that you'll do the best 
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So if you've been out of school for a 
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CALL: 546-3317 or 635-3116 



Cooke First Puzzle Winners 

I would like to announce the winners 
of Cooke First Alcohol Crossword Puzzle: 
Emily Hukill 
Angie Laflair 
Suzanne Nussbaum 
Sue Stolzer 
Congratulations to the four girls! On 
December 8th the girls went to the library, 
searched for the answers and completed 
the puzzle within two hours. I am proud 
of all of you! 

Thank you, 

Constantina Hajioannou 
Cooke 1st RA 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Val's home away from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: Cooler Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

Area's Best Lunches 11 AM-3 PM 

Happy Hour 4-6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



What Does Passage of the 
Higher Education Amendments of 1 986 
Mean to Your College-Bound Students? 



The Higher Education Amendments 
of 1986, PL. 99498 (the five-year ex- 
tension of the Higher Education Act of 
1965), have been signed into law by Presi- 
dent Reagan. The law authorizes up to 
$10.2 billion up from $9.8 billion last 
year, in federal aid for higher education 
in 1987. What changes to existing pro- 
grams will impact most on your students? 

Overall, there has been an increase in 
available funds for the programs most 
frequently used to provide financial aid 
to college-bound high school seniors, 
undergraduate and graduate students 
presently attending colleges and other 
types of postsecondary education. The 
programs include the Guaranteed Student 
Loan (GSL) Program, National Direct 
Student Loan (NDSL) Program (to be 
renamed Perkins Loan Program in aca- 
demic 1987), Supplemental Loans for 
Students and Loans for Parents, Pell 
Grants, Supplemental Educational Op- 
portunity Grants, and the College/Work- 
Study Program. 

New standards for eligibilty are present- 
ly being developed. For instance, in past 
years, only GSL borrowers whose families 
had incomes of $30,000 + had to sub- 
mit to a needs analysis. For. academic 
1987, every student applying for a GSL 
will have to submit to a needs analysis. 

Other changes have been made regard- 
ing financial dependency criteria. Pre- 
viously, an independent student was de- 



fined as one who lived with his or her 
parents less than six weeks during the 
calendar year, received less than $750 
worth of support from parents in the 
calendar year, and was not claimed by 
his or her parents as an exemption on their 
U.S. Income Tax Forms. Now, all 
students over 24 years of age will be con- 
sidered financially independent. Also, 
students who are orphans, wards of the 
court, veterans, graduate students, and 
have earned $4,000 during the calendar 
year will be considered financially 
independent. 

To qualify for aid after their sophomore 
year, students will have to maintain a 
"C" average (or grades consistent with 
their college's or university's graduation 
requirements). To qualify for aid other 
than Pell Grants, students will also have 
to earn at least $700 dunng the calendar 
year. 

A new loan consolidation program will 
be established. Student borrowing at least 
$5,000 can consolidate federal Guaran- 
teed, Direct, and Supplemental loans in- 
to a single monthly payment. The interest 
rate would be at least nine percent. Stu- 
dents would have up to 25 years to repay 
the loan. 

The following chart will indicate the 
most important changes resulting from 
passage of the Higher Education Amend- 
ments for each of the programs: 



OVERVIEW OF CHANGES TO HIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS 



Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL) Program 


" 


PREVIOUSLY: 


CHANGES: 


REMAINING THE SAME: 


• Up to $2,500 per year for un- 
dergraduates for each of five 
years. 


• Up to $2,650 for each of first 
two years, then up to $4,000 
for each of three additional 
years for undergraduates 


• Must be repaid. 

• Loan repayment begins six 
months after student leaves 
college 

• 10 years to repay 

• Five percent origination fee can 
be deducted from face value of 
loan 


• Up to $5,000 per year for grad 
uate students for each of five 
years 


• Up to $7,500 for each of five 
years for graduate students 


• Total GSL amount: $25,000 


• Total GSL amount: $54,750 


• Needs analysis for students from 
$30,000+ income families 


• Needs analysis for all borrov^ers 


• Interest rate: 8 percent. 


• Interest rate will be raised from 
8 to 10 percent during the fifth 
year of repayment. 




Winners of Doylestown Nature Club Scholarship*: 

Delaware Valley College students Rich Kulp. Nancy Ondra. and Bill Rein present gifts to Mrs Helen Naulof 
the Doulestown Nature Club, as tokens of their appreciation for receiving $ 1 , 000 scholarships from the Club in 
October The photo was taken outside Nostalgia m Chalfont, where the club's luncheon included honoring the 

Photo /Daily Intelligencer 



winners 



MEN JUMP OUT TO 7-5 RECORD 

BEST START SINCE 1970 



by John Litzke 



The DVC Men's Basketball team is 
playing the most relentlessly sound and 
exciting basketball ever witnessed by 
DVC faithful. In this, the 1986-87 sea- 
son, DVC has already beaten the likes of 
Kings, Elizabethtown, Drew and Wilkes. 

"We're playing well," said head coach 
Bill Werkiser. "Our players have put in a 
lot of hard work during practice and 
they've hustled during the games. That's 
all 1 can ask of them . So far it has worked 
out pretty well." Part of DVC's success is 
attributed to the fact that, as a team, 
they've been hitting 55.4% from the 
field and four players are shooting well 
above 60% individually (Dudley 66.6%, 
Bloemker 66.6%, Weldon 64.7% and 
Butts 65.5%) . "The key is we're working 
hard to get the good shot," said Werkiser. 
"Our ball-handlers are being patient. 
We're running when we can but when 
we don't have an opening we're setting 
up the offense." 

Sophomore forward Dwight Weldon 
has risen to the top of the DVC heap 
with his team leading 18.1 pts./game 
and 6.2 rebounds. "Dwight has really 
benefitted from moving from forward to 
guard," said Werkiser. "Since he's not 
underneath banging the whole game 
he's been able to let his offensive talent 
show through." 

It's good to have John Boone, a junior 
center from Olney H.S. in Philadelphia, 
banging the boards and giving DVC that 
reliable big man which is so important in 
the MAC. John is second on the team in 
scoring averaging 11.6 pts./game and 
has grabbed well over 100 boards this 
season. 

Unlike much of the MAC, DVC pos- 
sesses the talent of hitting the three-point 
shot effectively and no one does it better 
than freshman guard Daryl Minggia who 
leads the team with 15 three -pointers 
and is a threat to shoot the three anytime. 
As a team, DVC has hit over 30 three- 
pointers. 

Four points of DVC's game have 
changed this season, and for the better I 
must say; (1) The presence of a healthy 
big man in John Boone and two more 
than adequate backups in Chris Townsell 
and James Dudley, (2) DVC has attained 
the ability to win the close games in '87 
where, in '86, they dropped the one and 
two point games, (3) DVC has been able 
to take halftime leads or has been very 
close to their opponents at the half. 
They've shown they come back when 
they're down and hold a lead when they 
have it. This was not always so in the 
past, and, (4) They've used the new 
three-point shot to their utmost advantage. 




DVC coaching staff: They're pleased with the 
first half but know more has to be done. 



"I hope we can continue to play well in 
the second semester," said Werkiser. 
"We've got to maintain our intensity, 
both in practice and during games. If we 
can do that, I think we'll finish with a 
solid season. We've already proven that 
we can play with quality teams. Now we 
have to go out and prove it every time 
we take the court," finished Werkiser. 




Aggies celebrate 63-62 last second victory over Kings. 



GAME BY GAME SUMMARY 

November 21 at Cabrini: What a 
way to open the season. It was a thriller. 
DVC trailed at the half by only a field 
goal 32-30. Halftime scoring leaders for 
DVC were Dwight Weldon with 12 and 
John Boone with nine. Karl Sartor and 
Allen Jones each had eight and Micah 
Waters added seven for Cabrini. Regula- 
tion ended tied at 60-60 and Cabrini 
captured the overtime period 7-5 to give 
the Cavaliers the victory 67-65. The win 
gave Cabrini a record of 1-0 and dropped 
DVC to 0-1. Leaders for DVC were 
Dwight with 19, Boone with 13 and 
Cherry with 1 1 . Waters and Jones, both 
from West Philly H.S., had 18 and 14 
respectively and Sartor added 15. 

November 22 at Manor Jr. Col- 
lege: Beaver was the opponent and 
what a total thrashing they received. 
DVC put on a clinic, scoring the most 
points in their history for a 113-67 vic- 
tory. Six DVC players were in double fig- 
ures: Weldon (20), Boone (11), Butts 
(14), Cherry (18), Jones (11) and Ford 
(10). Everyone contributed. Boone and 
Wiorek were in double figures in rebounds 
with 15 and 14 respectively. DVC hit 
seven three-pointers: Minggia (2), Has- 
kins (1), Ford (2), Cherry (2). Mike 
Tener had 18 and Bryan Thompson had 
16 for Beaver. 

November 25 at Eastern: The visit- 
ing Aggies (1-2) trailed at the half by one 
34-33 but were outscored 37-26 in the 
second half enroute to their second loss 
of the season at the hands of Eastern 
(2-2) 71-59. DVC was led by Weldon 
with 20, Butts with 11 and Dudley with 
10. Arnold Johnson's 16 and Irv Hutch- 
erson's 13 were highs for Eastern. 

November 29 at Ursinus: The four- 
game road trip ended on a very positive 
note. Led by center John Boone's game 
and season high 22 points and seven re- 
bounds and Dwight Weldon's 16, DVC 
(2-2) squeaked by the host Bears (2-3) 
for a 68-64 victory. Trailing by a duece at 
the half 28-26, DVC surged ahead in the 
second half and led by as many as 12 
only to have Ursinus come on at the end 
to cut the lead but never regain it. Ur- 
sinus was led by senior guard Paul 
Udovich (Ridley H.S.) with 16 and soph- 
omore forward Rodney Joyner (M.L. 
King H.S.) with 10. 

December 1 at DVC: The Kings 
Monarchs, one of the top teams in the 
MAC. visited Work Gym for DVC's first 
home game of the season with a record 
of 1-1 and a truckload of overconfident, 
boisterous fans. 

DVC (3-2) sparkled on this evening. 
Trailing only by one at the half 24-23, 
DVC powered their way back and see- 
sawed with the Monarchs for the entire 
closing half. Then with only :09 remain- 
ing, junior center John Boone hit a 



clutch, clutch shot from the left of the 
paint to give DVC the lead at 63-62. 
Kings, neglecting to take a time-out, 
raced down the court and senior guard 
Rick Southcott was fouled to send him to 
the line shooting two with just :02 left. 
What a fatal blow. But no, Southcott ap- 
proached the line, first foul shot went up, 
and missed!! Now he could go for the tie 
and overtime. Obviously rattled by his 
first miss, Southcott stepped up the line, 
tossed up a real brick, DVC grabbed the 
rebound and we won it. We won it! What 
a blow this was to the Kings faithful. "We 
should be winning the game," they said. 
"Oh, golly, that touch should be a foul!" 
On their way out I was more than happy 
to distribute a complimentary crying 
towel and sunglasses (to hide those tear- 
filled, red, swollen eyes) to all the Kings 
fans. 

DVC was led by Boone, who played a 
whale of a game, with 15 points and 11 
rebounds and Joe Cherry who netted 
14. As a team DVC hit on 20/35 from 
the field and 21/25 from the line and 
robbed Kings for 1 1 steals. Ed Moyer, a 
6-8 senior from Norristown, led Kings 
with 27 and Brian Dobisch, a senior from 
Southampton, added 17 including five 
three-pointers. All in all it was a most 
satisfying win for coach Werkiser and the 
entire squad and the scorekeeper was 
pretty happy too. 

December 3 at FDU: DVC (3-3) 
suffered a temporary setback against the 
Jersey Devils (4-0) as forward Stephen 
Chwatek poured in 29 and Floyd Adams 
and Ivan Carvajal each added 1 1 to pace 
FDU to its 81-64 win. Freshman Daryl 
Minggia turned in a fine performance 
scoring 20 points which included five 
three-pointers and Smooth and Dwight 
each added 1 1 . FDU was a remarkable 
25-37 from the line. DVC outrebounded 
the Devils 38-29 but were handed their 
third loss of the year. 




December 6 at Drew: DVC (4-3) 

returned to their winning ways on a 
foreign court. DVC led by one at the half 
38-37 and increased their lead to as 
much as 14 in the second half only to 
have Drew fight back in the remaining 
moments to make it a nailbiter. DVC, 
behind Dwight's 25 and Smooth's 23, 
lifted DVC over Drew (2-3) 78-76. The 
Rangers were led by Bill Dunn with 20 
and Ken Farricker with 14. 

December 9 at DVC: DVC finished 
the semester out with a big win over a 
quality team. The Blue Jays from Eliza- 
bethtown flew in and were shot right 
down. DVC (5-3) off to one of their best 
starts, played a gem of a ballgame lead- 
ing at the half 50-39 and thrashing the 
Jays by a final score of 97-76. Sopho- 
more forward Dwight Weldon was an 
unheard of 12/12 from the field and 1/1 
from the line for a game high 25 points, 
Boone added 16 and Bloemker and 
Minggia each had 12. 

Steve Swope had IS and Greg Rodgers 
had 15 for E-town. This victory was 
sweet revenge for coach Werkiser and 
the team as DVC lost a heartbreaker last 
season to Elizabethtown at Elizabethtown 
on a half-court shot by Swope with no 
time remaining. 

DVC finished the semester 5-3 overall 
and 3-1 in the MAC. 




Weldon (18.1 avg.) and Dudley (6.0 avg) 
grapple for rebound. 



Guard Minggia led team in three pointers and 
earned starting point guard spot. 

January 8 at DVC: The Lions from 
Albright roared tonight. After leading 
most of the way in the first half, DVC lost 
that lead and went into the locker room 
at the half trailing by seven at 42-35. 
Boone was the leading scorer for DVC at 
the half with 12 and Scott Kuypers led 
Albright with 15. DVC came back to 
close the margin and take the lead but 
the Lions would prevail 70-67. John 
Boone led DVC with 23 and Dwight 
added 15 in the losing cause. Albright 
was led by Kuypers with 22 and Bob 
Cottrell pitched in with 15. 

January 10 at Wilkes: An always 
tough Wilkes Colonels team awaited the 
arrival of the new force in the MAC, the 
DVC Aggies. DVC took a 40-31 half- 
time lead into the locker room which was 
fueled by Minggia's 10 and Townsell's 
42. It was a foul-filled first half as DVC 
committed 15 fouls (25 for the game). It 
was all DVC the rest of the way and they 
went on to victory 73-63. 

DVC (6-4) was led by Daryl Minggia's 
21 (five three-pointers) and Chris Town- 
sell's 18. Wilkes (3-5) was led by Jeff 
Steeber with 20 and Mark Graves with 
19. 

At DVC: The Catholic U. Cardinals 
visited DVC all the way from Washing- 
ton, DC. DVC led at the half by nine at 
38-29 with Dwight collecting 13 and 
Cherry with 12. It wouldn't be DVC's 
game, however, as the Cards came back 
late in the game to overtake DVC and 
win it 69-63. Only six players would 
score for DVC which is a rarity. Leading 
DVC (6-5) was Dwight Weldon with 21, 

continued on page 5 




p<>Kt 



WILSON REIGN ENDS; 
BEDESEM TAKES HELM 




by John Litzke 

There's been a changing of the guard, 
so to speak, in the Delaware Valley Col- 
lege athletic department. Head football 
coach Al Wilson, after 11 years as the 
Aggie field commander, resigned in De- 
cember and former Villanova and Nesha- 
miny head coach Dick Bedesem will take 
over the Aggies beginning this fall . 

Wilson compiled a career record at 
Delaware Valley of 54-56 with his teams 
winning three MAC titles and posting six 
winning seasons and one .500 season. 

Wilson, after graduating from Ursinus 
College in 1959, began coaching at North 
Penn H.S. that same year. During the 
1960's he built championship programs 
on the high school level at Boiling Springs. 
Carlisle and Bald Eagle and also served 
at head coach of William Penn H.S. in 
Harrisburg. He built himself an outstand- 
ing reputation of turning losing football 
programs into winners. 

Al Wilson joined the staff of Wayne 
Hardin at Temple University in 1970 and 
served as a defensive coach under Har- 
din. Admittedly so, the three seasons Wil- 
son spent under Coach Hardin was the 
greatest football learning experience of 
his life. In 1972. he left Temple to take- 
over the football program at Princeton 
University where he stayed until 1975 
and, once again, built a very respectable 
program in the land of the Tigers. 

Wilson came to DVC in January 1976 
with his goal being to turn around and re- 
build a sagging program, and that he did. 
Three consecutive MAC championships 
followed and the championship team in 
1980 was the first Middle Atlantic Con- 
ference Championship in DVC history. 
"I've been involved in coaching for the 
past 27 years," Wilson said. "After that 
many years, it becomes a way of life. But 

1 feel confident that I've made the right 
decision." Thank you, Mr. Wilson for 
your cooperation, your dedication, your 
keen football sense, for those champion- 
ship memories, and for helping hundreds 
of young men to grow both physically 
and mentally. 

Installed into Wilson's football cleats is 
Dick Bedesem, who is no stranger to col- 
legiate level ball and no stranger to win- 
ning traditions. "This is a great oppor- 
tunity for me," said Bedesem. "I loved 
Neshaminy but I've always wanted to get 
back into college coaching. I still wanted 
the chance to work with college athletes, 
to see if I could put together a fine 
program." 

Bedesem is a Villanova alumnus and 
began his coaching career at LaSalle 
High School as an assistant coach. He 
left the Explorers after two seasons to 
take over as head coach of Bishop Egan 
High School and, under Bedesem, it 
won a number of Philadelphia Catholic 
league titles in his 12 year stay there. 

Perhaps Bedesem's most notable ac- 
complishment was his installation of the 
wishbone offense into Egan's scheme in 
1969. In the coming years Bedesem 
would have tenures at Archbishop 
Wood, Temple, Villanova, and University 
of Pittsburgh. 

Now in his first season as the new Aggie 
coach, Bedesem plans on doing some 
new and different things. "The bone 
(wishbone) will be installed," he said. 



(The wishbone is an offensive strategy 
where three running backs line up in the 
backfield in the shape of a "V" or a wish- 
bone.) "So many things can be done 
with this type of offense," Bedesem con- 
tinued. "The bone allows the offense to 
be multi-faceted, it allows the quarter- 
back to read the defense, give the option 
of pitching, running, or passing or hand- 
ing off to one of the backs." It is a bit 
complicated and repetitious, but once it 
is run it can be most effective and ex- 
citing. "The defense will also show multi- 
ple formations (3-4. 4-3, 5-2) depending 
on the play and should keep the offense 
on their toes," said Bedesem. 




Bedesem has been a close observer of 
Delaware Valley football for his son Tom 
played here and graduated and his other 
son Vince will play under his father in his 
senior year as Delaware Valley's right out- 
side linebacker. 

"When I first came up here I was 
amazed at the number of excellent ath- 
letes in a Division III program," he said. 
"Coming from two Division I programs I 
had little or no exposure to Division III 
football. But I had a hard time believing 
such good athletes were playing Division 
III." He mentioned how the recruiting 
process will be a bit different. "It's the dif- 
ference between recruiting scholarship 
athletes and non -scholarship athletes," 
said Bedesem. "We'll look for youngsters 
who can fit in academically. We want our 
players to get involved in the school. We 
want them to be happy and stay here for 
four years." "We would like to see our 
players display poise, class, and discipline, 
I feel these three things are very impor- 
tant," concluded Bedesem. 

Mr. Jack Mazak will remain as his as- 
sistant otherwise there will be a whole 
new staff that Coach Bedesem is very 
excited about. So, next season, DVC will 
have a whole new look on the field as 
well as the sidelines and we'd all like to 
welcome Mr. Bedesem to our family and 
thank Mr. Wilson for all he's done. Good 
luck to both. 



^ia^-Up 



Intramural Basketball Set to Begin 



by John Litzke 

There's nothing like it. DVC intramural 
basketball is here and ready ... to soar 
like Dominique . . . glide like Jordan . . . 
score like Bird . . . and jam like Doc! 
Games start this week so make sure your 
rosters are reverse-lay-uped into Mr. Wolf- 
gang soon. 

Defending champion Double Stuff is 
ready to take on one and all. The compe- 
tition in '87 will be intense. We'll be search- 
ing for new scoring leaders this season 
too. Paul "Sky" Sterling has retired and 
will be inducted into the Hall of Fame, 
Ducky Boy has turned pro and James 
Parker has joined the broadcast team of 
Temple basketball. It should be a great 
season with moves . . . 

Like This . . . 



And Maybe This . 




Or This . . . 





So get out there and participate or 
cheer your favorite team on . 



1 986 Scoring Leaders 




NAME 


TEAM 


G 


TOTAL 


AVG 


Sterling, Paul 


GFC 


8 


201 


25 1 


Townsell, Chris 


GFC 


8 


194 


242 


Sweda, Bruce 


ORB 


6 


133 


22 1 


Parker, James 


DS 


8 


140 


17.5 


Porter. Dan 


DOM 


7 


98 


14.0 


Hoffner, Martin 


GFC 


7 


98 


14.0 


Ellison, Daryll 


DS 


10 


139 


13.9 


Bauzon, Mark 


1C 


10 


138 


13.8 


Keich, Dave 


DS 


10 


136 


13.6 


Boyle. Chris 


IC 


10 


125 


125 


Dietrick, Rick 


BOS 


7 


82 


11.7 


Lutz, Todd 


JH 


6 


70 


11.6 


Wheaton, Matt 


FB 


9 


103 


11.4 


Boyle, Bill 


BOS 


6 


68 


11.3 


Prostsko, Eric 


IC 


8 


89 


11.1 


Leinbach, Paul 


BM 


9 


99 


11.0 


Chard, Dan 


FB 


8 


88 


11.0 


Sharde, Doug 


DOM 


7 


77 


11.0 


Nolan, Brandt 


DS 


8 


87 


10.8 


Butterworth. Clay 


BM 


9 


94 


10.4 


Stanton, Kevin 


FB 


8 


81 


10.1 


Smith, Sean 


DOM 


4 


40 


10.0 


Swineford, Rod 


IC 


10 


100 


100 



SFV DETHRONES EMO 

BEHIND CAFFEY & 

KASPRZAK 

Another grueling floor hockey season 
climaxed with the rematch of last season's 
finale. Defending champion EMO had its 
entire lineup back this season with senior 
Mike Heisy guarding the net and high 
scoring Walt Kobryznski, Rich Simononis 
and Tom Lewandowski among the EMO 
foot soldiers and net rippers. EMO finished 
with a 6-1-0 record with their only loss 
coming to Screaming for Vengeance. 

Screaming for Vengeance was out for 
vengeance. With the frustration of last 
year's final loss to EMO hanging over 
their heads, SFV was out to return the 
favor. SFV had an unblemished season 
going 7-0 powered by net rippers Steve 
Caffey, Rob Benner and Chris Freudig 
and a fortress in goal named Hank Kas- 
przak who had an outstanding season as 
the SFV netminder. 

The playoffs saw EMO enter the finals 
with a 6-3 victory over The Wolfpack 
and SFV enter with a win over the Brew 
Crew 3-2. So the stage is set. Finesse vs. 
Power, kind of a Soviet Union-Flyers 
matchup in '74. 

The Finesse team would take the early 
lead and never relinquish it. Caffey, a 
Gretzky-like scorer, scored the first goal 
of the game in period number one as- 
sisted by Rob Benner. Winger Rick 
Martell scored the second goal midway 
through the period, Caffey hit on his sec- 
ond goal of the game to make it 3-0 and 
forward Chris Freudig finished off the 
first period barrage with a score past 
goalie Heisy to make it a commanding 
SFV 4-0 lead going into the locker room . 
That would be all they would need as a 
late second period goal by EMO forward 
Chris Snyder made it 4-1 and the cup 
belonged to Screaming for Vengeance. 

Forward Steve Caffey was voted MVP 
for his two-goal performance and Hank 
Kasprzak received the Vezina Trophy for 
Outstanding Goaltender in '86. The SFV 
"D" stood tall the entire season with 
credit going to defensive tandems of 
Clancy- Vinitski and Marko- Murphy. 

Congratulations to SFV and runnerup 
EMO on fine seasons and all those who 
participated in DVC hockey '86. 

Men's Basketball 

continued from page 4 

Joe Butts with 17 including three three- 
pointers, Joe Cherry with 13 and John 
Boone with 10. Kevin Morrison, out of 
LaSalle H.S. in Philadelphia, scored 17 
for Catholic (8-6) while Robert McCarry 
had 14 and Charles Thompson 10. 

At DVC: Allentown proved to be no 
match as they fell to 2-12 overall after 
their 61-50 loss to DVC (7-5. 4-2 MAC) . 
It was balanced scoring on the part of 
DVC as Butts had 14, Weldon 12, Ford 
10, Boone 7, Townsell 6 and Sports 4. 
The Centaurs were led by Bilicic and 
Ward with 10 and Chiaradia with 9. 



DELAWARE VALLEY COLLEGE MEN'S BASKETBALL 








1986-87 EIGHT-GAME STATISTICS 








NAME 


GAMES FG-FGA 


% 


3-PT. GOALS 


FT-FTA 


X 


PTS. 


AVG. 


A 


ST. 


REBS 


AVG. 


Dwkjht Weldon 


8 


57- 88 


64.7 





31- 34 


91 1 


145 


18.1 


18 


16 


50 


6.2 


John Boone 


8 


34- 71 


47.8 





25- 31 


806 


93 


116 


15 


7 


78 


9.7 


Joe Butts 


4 


19- 29 


65.5 





3- 6 


500 


41 


10.2 


10 


7 


17 


4.2 


Daryl Minggia 


8 


' 25- 53 


47.1 


15 


5 10 


500 


70 


8.7 


20 


8 


7 


0.9 


Bryan Haskins 


7 


22- 36 


61.1 


6 


5- 5 


100.0 


55 


7.8 


9 


9 


8 


1.1 


Joe Cherry 


6 


17- 40 


42 5 


4 


14- 16 


875 


52 


65 


7 


3 


13 


1.6 


James Dudley 


8 


22- 33 


666 





4- 12 


333 


48 


60 


7 


9 


49 


6.0 


Eric Ford 


8 


14- 31 


45.1 


3 


9- 13 


69 2 


40 


5.0 


12 


16 


8 


1.0 


Gene Bloemkcr 


8 


16- 24 


666 





1- 2 


500 


33 


4.1 


3 


2 


30 


37 


Jeff Bobb 


1 


1 2 


50.0 





2- 2 


1000 


4 


4.0 











0.0 


John Jones 


4 


8- 15 


533 





3- 4 


75.0 


19 


3.8 








9 


1.1 


Chris Townsell 


1 


1- 2 


50.0 





0- 


— 


2 


2.0 


1 








00 


John Wiorek 


4 


3- 5 


60.0 





1- 3 


333 


7 


1.7 





3 


17 


4.2 


TOTALS 


8 


238-429 


55.4 


28 


103-138 


74.6 


607 


76 1 


102 


80 


286 


35.7 




Sports Trivia '87 

If you've never tried the sports quiz 
question in the past, your chances are 
endless in '87. Here is your opportunity. 
If your corcect entry is picked from the 
thousands of entries I receive — well, the 
two or three I receive — then you will re- 
ceive a coupon for a free Aggieburger, 
fries, and Pepsi from Caesars Pub. 

Match the nicknames and teams for 
these former ABA franchises: 



1. Minnesota 


A. Stars 


2. Pittsburgh 


B. Floridians 


3. Anaheim 


C. Buccaneers 


4. Los Angeles 


D. Oaks 


5. Dallas 


E. Muskies 


6. Houston 


F. Conquistadors 


7. Miami 


G. Amigos 


8. Carolina 


H. Chaparrals 


9. New Jersey 


I. Pros 


10. New Orleans 


J. Condors 


11. Washington 


K. Mavericks 


12. Memphis 


L. Squires 


13. San Diego 


M. Americans 


14. Oakland 


N. Cougars 


15. Baltimore 


O. Capitals 


16. Virginia 


P. Claws 



You can't win if you don't play. Most 
correct matches will win. In case of a tie, 
the earliest correct entry will win. 



Women in Communications 
to Hold Career Day 

Jackie Hays, Jerry Penacoli and Dar- 
rell Sifford are among the many media 
personalities who will speak at the an- 
nual Women in Communications Career 
Day on Saturday, February 21, 1987. 

Hays, anchor-reporter at KYW-TV, 
will open the half-day conference with 
the keynote address on careers in com- 
munications. Penacoli, KYW-TV news 
anchor, will host a television workshop. 
Sifford, syndicated Philadelphia Inquirer 
columnist, will speak on politics in the 
workplace. 

The conference is geared to both male 
and female high school and college stu- 
dents, career changers and anyone inter- 



ested in moving into or up in the com- 
munications field. 

To be held at the University of Penn- 
sylvania's Houston Hall, 3417 Spruce 
St., the conference will begin with regis- 
tration at 8:30 a.m. and conclude at 
12:30 p.m. More than 30 top profes- 
sionals will participate in workshop 
panels in radio, TV, freelance, news- 
papers, magazines, publications, public 
relations, advertising, design, entrepre- 
neurship, career planning and politics in 
the workplace. 

Advance registration is $18.00 for stu- 
dent and professional members, $20.00 
for non-members. For more information 
on the Women in Communications 
Career Day, call 215-988-6980 in Penn- 
sylvania, 609-342-3887 in New Jersey. 




SPORTS' BRIEFS '87 

by John Litzke 

• Phillies pitcher Don Carman breaks 
wrist in car accident. May miss first two 
weeks of training camp. 

• Sixers Shakeup: Trade third guard 
Sedale Threat to Chicago for ballhan- 
dler Steve Colter. Sign veteran free- 
agent World B. (Lloyd) Free. Ham- 
pered guard Andrew Toney is banished 
from the team until questions can be 
answered concerning his ailing feet. 
"He's a negative influence on our 
bench," said coach Matt Goukas. "I 
want Andrew to take some time away 
from the team and get some things 
straightened out." Doc, Barkley, 
Cheeks and Toney remain from the 
'85'86 team. Injured Jeff Ruland set 
to return to the lineup this week. 

• In two meetings so far, Moses haunts 
Sixers and leads Bullets to triumph in 
both meetings. Game 1: Moses scores 
28, grabs 21 rebounds; Game 2: Moses 
scores 39, grabs 17 rebounds. 

• In college bowl action this holiday it 
was: 

Florida Citrus: Auburn 16, USC 7 
Cotton: Ohio St. 28, Texas A&M 12 
Sugar: Nebraska 30, LSU 15 
Fiesta: Penn St. 14, Miami FL 10 
Rose: Arizona St. 22, Michigan 15 
Peach: Virginia Tech 26, N.C. St. 24 
Bluebonnet: Baylor 21, Colorado 9 
Holiday: Iowa 39, San Diego St. 38 
Freedom: UCLA 31, Brigham Y. 10 
Liberty: Tennessee 21, Minnesota 14 
Gator: Clemson 27, Stanford 21 
Aloha: Arizona 30, N. Carolina 21 
Sun: Alabama 28, Washington 6 
Hall of Fame: 

Mississippi 20, Texas Tech 17 
California: 

San Jose St. 37, Miami (OH) 7 
All- American: 

Florida St. 27, Indiana 13 
Blue-Gray All-Star Game: 

Blue 31, Gray 7 (Paul Palmer of 

Temple gains 166 yards and earns 

MVP honors) 

• Flyers trade goalie Bob Froese to NY. 
Rangers for defenseman Kjeill Samuel- 
son and rights to Rangers second 
round pick in '88 or *90. 



• Detroit pitcher Jack Morris finds no 
takers for him and his multi-million 
dollar contract. So, he talks to Tigers 
again. 

• Here's how the top 10 basketball teams 
in Southeastern, Pa. look as of January 
10: 

1. South Philadelphia 

2. Dobbins 

3. West Philadelphia 

4. Conestoga 

5. Penn Charter 

6. Roman Catholic 

7. Frankford 

8. Chester 

9. Ridley 

10. Council Rock 

• Yankees trade catcher Butch Wynegar 
to California for pitcher Ron Romanick. 

• Temple football coach Bruce Arians 
upon receiving an offer to be head 
coach at his alma mater, Virginia Tech, 
turns down the offer and will stay at 
Temple. 

• Dick Vermeil, former Eagles coach and 
current broadcaster for CBS, is offered 
head coaching job at Atlanta where he 
would be reunited with Marion Camp- 
bell. Vermeil turns it down because of 
one-year remaining on his CBS con- 
tract. Do us all a favor Dick and get out 
of the broadcast booth. 

• Slugger Reggie Jackson signs with his 
old team, the Oakland A's after being 
away from them for 11 years. Former 
Texas Ranger Gary Ward signs multi- 
year contract with Yankees. Steinbren- 
ner is trash -picking again. 

• Oklahoma Ail-American Brian Bos- 
worth is barred from Orange Bowl 
game because of accused steroid use. 
Bosworth, after initially being told by 
coach Barry Switzer not to return to 
Oklahoma for his senior year, now has 
the option of returning to the Sooners 
or turning pro. My ears have heard 
that Bosworth and Chicago quarter- 
back Jim McMahon would both like to 
play for Buddy Ryan. 

• In NFL playoff action: 
Wild-Card Games: 

N.Y. Jets 35, Kansas City 15 
Washington 19, LA. Rams 7 
Quarterfinal Games: 
Washington 27, Chicago 13 
N.Y. Giants 49, San Francisco 3 
Cleveland 23, N.Y. Jets 20 
Denver 22, New England 17 
Semifinal Games: 
Denver 23, Cleveland 20 
N.Y. Giants 17, Washington 
Super Bowl Sunday: January 25, 6 
p.m., Channel 10 from Pasadena, 
California. It is Super Bowl XXI: New 
York Giants vs. Denver Broncos. The 
spread is out from Vegas: Denver +8. 

• Houston Rockets starting backcourt 
suspended for two years after accused 
cocaine use. Overbrook High's Lewis 
Lloyd and Mitchell Wiggins are the 
guilty sniffers. 

• Von Hayes receives new three-year 
contract with Phils at a salary reported 
at 3. 1 million over three years. 




Minor League Team's 
Feeling Wrath of DVC 

The fledgling season of Delaware Val- 
ley College JV basketball is off the ground 
and doing very well under Head Coach 
Mark Werkiser, son of Varsity Coach Bill 
Werkiser. Behind future stars Ron Slutsky, 
John Jones, Joe Brown, Mike Sutryno- 
wicz, Jeff Bobb, Mike Dalton, Sean Baily, 
Bill Green, and Mark Douc, the DVC JV 
has compiled an outstanding (5-1) record. 
The following is a wrap-up of their six 
game schedule so far: 

Vs. Montgomery CCC 

DVC took the halftime lead 35-30 
powered by eight from Joe Brown, seven 
from Slutsky, and six from Dalton and 
Sutrynowicz. DVC never trailed and fin- 
ished off Montco by a score of 76-71. 
Joe Brown was high scorer for DVC with 
16 points and John Jones added 14. 
Guard Tim Cann had 23 for Montco. 

Vs. Albright 

DVC raised their record to 4-1 after 
their comeback victory over the Lions, 
66-56. DVC trailed Albright at the half 
38-32, but surged ahead to stay behind a 
34-18 second half powered by Ron Slut- 
sky's 19, John Jones' 14, and Mike Sutry- 
nowicz's 12. Gilbert led Albright with 18. 

Vs. Carbo Tree Service 

The tree trimmers put up a tough bat- 
tle. But DVC brought our some chain- 
saws of their own and chopped down 
Carbo Tree Service, 73-66. Jones poured 
in 24. Brown had 17, and Nick Salone 
added 12. D. Brown had 23 for Carbo's. 

Vs. Cabrini 

DVC grabbed the halftime lead over 
Cabrini 28-24 with Joe Brown's eight 
and John Jones'seven leading the way. 
Dalton Hillyard led Cabrini with ten . This 
was DVC's ball game as they controlled 
the tempo for a 56-51 opening game vic- 
tory. Slutsky led DVC with 21 including 
three three-pointers and Jeff Bobb had 
ten and 15 rebounds. Hillyard, a west 
Philadelphia H.S. product, finished with 
a team high of 20. Totals had DVC hitting 
16 field goals and were 22/39 from the 
line. Cabrini finished with 22 field goals 
and 7/10 from the line. 

Vs. Kings 

A strong JV squad from Kings College 
visited. Kings took a 43-29 halftime lead. 
Leaders at the half for DVC were Slutsky 
and Jones with five and Brown with six. 
Mulville had 15 and Mergers eight for 
Kings. Kings resumed their domination 
in the second half on their way to a 
85-67 win. Joe Brown led DVC with 22 
and John Jones had 14. Mulville had 25 
for Kings. 

STAFF 

Editors-in-Chief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Artist Monica Etzweiler 

Reporters Mike Bolles, Missy 

Brangan, Brett Hart, Judy Henry, John 

Nicholson, Melanie O'Neill, Brian 

Taggart, Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry. Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 

Dr. Richard Ziemer 



ATTENTION 

Delaware Valley sports coverage 

doesn't end this week by far. 

Check out next week's paper for 

further updates of men's basketball 

and full updates of women's basketball, 

wrestling, and intramurals. 



ORDER YOUR SEATS NOW!! Stfsrj 

48 Top Pros. Singles & Doubles. $465,000 Prize Money 1987 

ToufTMMiient Champions 
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1973 Stan Smith 



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Box Seat Information 



i 9 $225 dot 0M1 
($25 tax deductible) available tor ma aaven day, 
eight day. eight aaaaton aartaa ONLY 
Section* E, F. Q, H. I, R. S. T, U, V, Row* 1-21. 
Not* Anyone who wi»ha* to be »*ated in the first 
five row* (temporary seats) tor the aacond 
four »eeal om , wHt be aaatad in accord with 
their selection tor the firat four »aa*iona in: 

a) Flrat eight row* D. J. Q. W 

b) First five row* C, K, P. X 
Silver Patron Box Seats 9 $200 par seet 
Available for the aaven day. eight session 
•arte* ONLY 

Section* D, J.QW. Row* 8-31 

Gold Patron Seet Holders Bonual Receive an 
invitation to attend the January 26 gala preview 
opening of TanNe-ln-Art XVI *. 

includes wee* long membership af OvMona, tha 
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//tied m tha handsome tournamant program book 
tor all Box Seat holders. 

A limited number of week e n d packages are avail- 
able 9 $140 par seat For information, call the 
Tournament Office, 215-947-2530 



'opoctrum 



February 2-8, 
1987 

a •Gold Patron Box Seats 

available » $225 par aeat 
026 tax deductible) 
Section* E. F. Q, H, I. R. 
S, T, U, V 
1-21 tor 8 1 
ONLY 



Mon Fab | 

Tims Pah I 

WM Fab 4 

, Thurt Fso 1. 

F<l ' « I, 

Sat F*b I 

Sat Fob 7 
Sun 



10 AM 
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3 PM 
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Pat S. t PM « PM F«M> a 
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available ® $2O0 per seat 
Section* D. J, 0, W 
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series ONLY 



FOR TICKET INFORMATION CALL 215-947-3530 
(Plee 

NAME 

Aoomss 

CITY 
STATE 



•$20 00 Seats 
Section* A B. C, K, L. M. 
N, O. P. X, Y, Z 
i1-21 



■ "$17 50 Seats 

Sectton* 5-16. 25-36 
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•Subject to availability 



telephone » 

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For information call 215-947-2530 




€B€L US. PRO INDOOR 



MADISON SQUARE GARDEN 




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CABLE: MadllM Squirt Garten 



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TCKET PMCtS $20 00 $11 00 $11 00 $14 00 $10 00 $1 00 

Kmcks ticket* are on sale *t the Garden box oflice. al 
Tickatron outlets throughout the metropolitan area and by 
calling Teietron to charge ticket* by phone 



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Ranger* tickets are on sale at the Garden box office, at 
Tickatron outlets throughout th* metropolitan ar*« and by 
calling Teietron to charge ticket* by phone 



Ticket information 
Teietron Charge By Phone 

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Season Subscription information 
Group Sales information 
Knteks Hotline 



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* WW* 




I saip/ta^not 

A 5LAP5H0T! 




HAVING TROUBLE COMMUNICATING? If your words aren't getting your message 
across, come to the DVC writing center for individual instruction. See Dr Heath. Lasker 
18, for scheduling. 




John Boone (42) hits baseline jumper over 
Kings' defender 

Athlete of the Week: 

This week's athlete of the week is a 
man who needs no introduction. John 
Boone, a junior center from Olney H.S. 
in Philadelphia, has been an integral part 
of this year's team's success. John is 
averaging 11.6 points per game and has 
crashed the backboards for over 125 re- 
bounds through 12 games. Besides his 
skill on the boards, John has demonstrat- 
ed the value of a big man in the middle 
as far as intimidation and reliability go. 
Because of his leadership, hard work 
and strong play f v uughout the season, 
John Boone has been named Athlete of 
the Week. Congratulations. 



ADOPT A VaALENTINE 

Need a change from hearts and flowers 
for your Valentine? Are ribbons and lace 
becoming passe? Why not give a gift that 
chirps or climbs, slithers or swings instead? 
ADOPT an animal from the Philadelphia 
Zoo for that special someone, and your 
gift will be remembered all year long — 
not just on February 14th. 

For as little as $25.00, you can give a 
chinchilla named Puff — the four-legged 
kind that looks just great in her own fur. 
Or for a bit more, say $1 .500. our jaguar 
Nicky might be just the ticket. He comes 
equipped with a powerful engine and his 
own sported upholstery. And for nearly 
every amount in between, you can find 
the right animal. That special someone 
will be thrilled to receive Whiskers, the 
prairie dog; Boris or Cloris. the slow 
lorises; Blackie. the American alligator; 
Oliver, the great horned owl; Blondie or 
Marmalade, golden lion tamarins; or 
even a Mexican axilotl. An axilotl? Sushi, 
the baby sea lion, would make a swim- 
ming gift for the right person. Each 
ADOPT parent can visit his or her special 
"child" the next time out to the zoo. 

The Zoo's ADOPT (Animals Depend 
On People Too) program provides two 
benefits. Not only is there the fun of 
becoming an instant parent for a full year, 
but also all money from the program goes 
toward feeding our animals all year round 
and helps defray some of the cost of the 
annual food bill of over $300,000. For 
lesser amounts, you can provide a lunch 
or dinner or a week of meals for the 
animals, too. 

ADOPT parents receive a kit that con- 
tains ADOPTion papers, a fact sheet on 
their particular animal, and an iron-on 
decal that proudly lets everyone know 
you've ADOPTed. For animals over $100, 
parents will receive a photo of their 
ADOPTee. Each parent is invited to spe- 
cial ADOPT Day festivities in October, 
too, just for them. 

For anyone interested in this special 
Valentine's gift, one that's a cinch to 
stand out in the crowd of candy and 
hearts, please call the ADOPT office at 
the Philadelphia Zoo. 243-1100, ext. 
232. Don't wait till the last minute. Our 
animals would love to hear from you. 






lo)®l]ai^sims^siIin(§^ ©sfllksgs® 



Vol. XXI, No. 15 
Friday, January 30, 1987 




Buy Valentine Lines! 

Weather: 

Today: Snow 

Tomorrow: Snow 

Sunday. Snow, probably 



NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 




Has AGRICULTURE Become a "Dirty Word?" 



ADOPT A VALENTINE 

Need a change from hearts and flowers 
for your Valentine? Are ribbons and lace 
becoming passe'? Why not give a gift that 
chirps or climbs, slithers or swings instead? 
ADOPT an animal from the Philadelphia 
Zoo for that special someone, and your 
gift will be remembered all year long — 
not just on February 14th . 

For as little as $25,00, you can give a 
chinchilla named Puff — the four-legged 
kind that looks just great in her own fur. 
Or for a bit more, say $1,500, our jaguar 
Nicky might be just the ticket. He comes 
equipped with a powerful engine and his 
own spotted upholstery. And for nearly 
every amount in between, you can find 
the right animal. That special someone 
will be thrilled to receive Whiskers, the 
prairie dog: Boris or Cloris, the slow 
lorises; Blackie, the American alligator; 
Oliver, the great horned owl; Blondie or 
Marmalade, golden lion tamarins; or 
even a Mexican axilotl. An axilotl? Sushi, 
the baby sea lion, would make a swim- 
ming gift for the right person. Each 
ADOPT parent can visit his or her special 
"child" the next time out to the zoo. 

The Zoo's ADOPT (Animals Depend 
On People Too) program provides two 
benefits. Not only is there the fun of 
becoming an instant parent for a full year, 
but also all money from the program goes 
toward feeding our animals all year round 
and helps defray some of the cost of the 
annual food bill of over $300,000. For 
lesser amounts, you can provide a lunch 
or dinner or a week of meals for the 
animals, too. 

ADOPT parents receive a kit that con- 
tains ADOPTion papers, a fact sheet on 
their particular animal, and an iron-on 
decal that proudly lets everyone know 
you've ADOPTed. For animals over $100. 
parents will receive a photo of their 
ADOPTee. Each parent is invited to spe- 
cial ADOPT Day festivities in October, 
too. just for them. 

For anyone interested in this special 
Valentine's gift, one that's a cinch to 
stand out in the crowd of candy and 
hearts, please call the ADOPT office at 
the Philadelphia Zoo, 243-1100. ext. 
232. Don't wait till the last minute. Our 
animals would love to hear from you. 

Audubon Society 

presents 
Dinosaur Overview 

The next meeting of the local branch 
of the Audubon Society will be Tuesday, 
February 3, 8 p.m. in Mandell Hall. 

The topic "Discovering Dinosaurs" will 
be presented by Michael Weilbacher, 
Museum Educator for the new dinosaur 
exhibit at the Academy of Natural 
Sciences in Philadelphia. He will give a 
slide overview of dinosaurs — who they 
are, how they developed and newest dis- 
coveries — and documentation that birds 
are their direct decendants. 



by Bill Rein 

"Since 'agriculture' is not only a con- 
fusing term, but is almost a dirty word ac- 
cording to the New York Times, we 
should delete the term from everything 
associated with DVC," Dr. David Blu- 
menfield recently suggested to faculty 
and administration in response to a 
similar letter submitted to the college's 
Campus Communicator by Dr. Julian 
Prundeanu last November 24. 

Dr. Prundeanu, Professor and Depart- 
ment Chairman of Agronomy, had noted 
that the confusing image of agriculture 
may be part of what Dr. Blumenfield 
called "student recruiting problems." Dr. 
Prundeanu has been associated with 
DVC, in various roles, for almost forty 
years. 

Dr. Blumenfield said specifically that 
"Agriculture and Science" should be re- 
moved from our name; the term "agri- 
culture" should be deleted from our cata- 
log and all other promotional materials. 
He suggests a more encompassing image 
of the college would include equal time 
to all major programs offered. "We should 
emphasize the quality of all our pro- 
grams, and the unparalleled success of 



all of our graduates in important career 
areas," he added, and one way of doing 
this would be to have "each department 
identifying itself with those major career 
areas that the general public would 
understand," therefore removing the 
ambiguity inherent in terms such as 
"Agronomy" and "Horticulture" which 
simply deal with food as a career. Dr. 
Blumenfield is a Professor of Horticulture 
and graduate of DVC. 

Beyond name changing and de-em- 
phasis. Dr. Blumenfield says that "Ad- 
missions personnel should be well-paid, 
personable, technical sales representa- 
tives . . ." and that "bonuses should be 
given to those who get results and any 
rep who does not secure a minimum 
number of student applications, and ma- 
triculations, should be released." Further- 
more, the "entire college community" 
needs to adopt a "Search for Excellence" 
concept, which calls for "open communi- 
cations, common sense, enthusiasm, 
creativity, respect for the individual, in- 
telligent planning," and an overall sense 
of "responsibility and accountability" in 
the promotion of DVC's programs. 




THE GREEN SCENE 
AT DVC 

by Jerry Fritz 

Club News 

Last semester, the Landscape-Nursery 
Club kept busy with many new projects 
and activities. For starters. Homecoming 
seemed to come around faster than ever, 
although the club designed and assem- 
bled a simulated woodland garden as 
their float. Though they did not win a top 
prize, they did enjoy themselves once 
again in the home bam (the night before) , 
putting it all together while the rain came 
down. 

After Homecoming, the L-N Club be- 
gan working on their fall landscape proj- 
ect — the rock garden located in front of 
the main greenhouses Many of the plants 
installed here were dwarf conifers, do- 
nated by Marty Brooks '54, of Marty 
Brooks Rare Plant Nursery. Doylestown. 
The main purpose of this walk-through 
garden is to display typical rock garden 
plant material. Finishing touches will be 
made for educational use, as soon as the 
weather breaks 

Some very impressive speakers visited 
DVC on the L-N Club's invitation; these 
included Derek Fell, Chase Rosade, 
Doug Kale and our own Dave Benner. 



Spring semester activities will include a 
trip to Chuck Gale's greenhouses in 
which we will see plants being forced for 
the Philadelphia Flower Show; a trip to 
Winterthur Gardens, one of the DuPont 
estates in Delaware; the Middle Atlantic 
Landscape Field Day; and a trip to Kale's 
Nurseries in Princeton, N.J. 

More guest speakers are planned for 
this semester: Dr. Alice Heath, Professor 
of Liberal Arts, will give us her insight in- 
to English Gardens; Dan Tamminga will 
speak on the landscape as an industry; 
and Carter van Dyke will speak about 
landscape architecture. 

IF ANYONE IS INTERESTED IN 
JOINING THE LANDSCAPE-NURSERY 
CLUB, LOOK FOR MEETING NOTICES 
POSTED AROUND THE CAMPUS. 

Campus Arboretum News 

Recently, two weeping white pines 
were donated by Art Poley and planted 
on the south side of the Student Center. 
However, some idiot found it a good 
idea to destroy one of them! 

In another planting, donated by the 
Class of '32, a weeping purple beech has 
been destroyed, also. 

It is a shame that these immature acts 
must take place; people complain that 
the campus should look more pleasing, 
but with people on campus committing 
acts such as this it is hard to improve our 
campus. 

Registered Video Dance 

The Landscape- Nursery Club spon- 
sored another registered video dance this 
past Friday night. Considering the 
weather, everything went great. By the 
way, you cannot buy tickets at the door, 
for those of you who still don't know!! 
We hope this party will encourage other 
clubs to sponsor parties this semester. 



WILL YOU MEET 
THIS CHALLENGE? 

by Ann Whitesell 

For all you weak-kneed doubting- 
thomases that did not give at DVC's last 
blood drive, I have a challenge for you. 
You have a chance to make this coming 
blood drive the best in the history of 
DVC. Your blood is the gift of life. 

Ask the 186 students, faculty, admin- 
istrators and staff what it means to give. I 
am sure a few had doubts and fears, but 
they made the effort to help people in 
need The stats from the last blood drive 
speaks for the caring of people on cam- 
pus. The goal for the last blood drive was 
150 pints of blood. We surpassed the 
goal with 165 pints That's an overall effi- 
ciency rate of 1 10% . I guess giving until 
nothing is left still means something to- 
day to people who give blood. Most im- 
portant is the fact that 825 hospital pa- 
tients who required blood and blood 
products have been touched by the gift 
of 165 pints. 

So the next time you say it doesn't 
matter, think twice, you might save a life 
... or two. I hope to see you at the next 
blood drive on February 10, 1987, 12-5 
p.m. Consider this your personal invita- 
tion to a celebration of life. 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 
INTERVIEWS FOR THE 
WEEK OF FEBRUARY 2 

Thursday, February 5 

PENNFIELD CORP. 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

SIGN-UP IN THE PLACEMENT 
OFFICE FOR ALL INTERVIEWS. 

This Week on 
Campus 

by Wendy L. Unger 
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30 

DVC at the Spectrum! Sixers play 
Chicago, 7:30 p.nv 

SATURDAY. JANUARY 31 

W (H) vs Widener & Gettysburg, 1 

p.m. 

WBB (A) vs. FDU Madison, 7:30 p.m 

MBB (H) vs Wilkes. 8 p.m. 

DAY, FEBRUARY 1 

Bridal Fair, DVC Student Center 
(reservations required) 

DAY. FEBRUARY 2 

MBB (A) vs. Spring Garden, § p.m 
WBB (A) vs. Spring Garden, 6 prn 
Women's Intramural Hockey, 6:30 
p.m. 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3 

W (H) vs. Kings. 7 p.m 

Girl Scout Cookies on sale during 

dinner! 

Audubon Society presents Dinosaurs! 

See blurb on this page. 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4 

MBB (A) vs. Saanton, 8:15 p,m 
WBB (A) vs Scranton, 6:15 p.m. 
Women's rnframural Hockey, 6:30 
p.m. 

* * * * 




MONEY-FOR-COLLEGE 



by Irving Bender 

Q. I live away from my parents and 
will be working full time to support my- 
self — but will have no money to help 
myself through college. (R.W., PA) 

A. First: check with school counselor 
about government grants and loans. 
Also, what aid the school offers for its 
own students. Second: you qualify for 
private sector awards based on factors in 
your background including gender, resi- 
dency, field of interest and many others. 

Here is a private source award you are 
eligible for if your field were economics: 
YOUNG AMERICA'S FOUNDATION 
(COLEMAN-TIMOLAT SCHOLAR- 
SHIP), 11800 Sunrise Valley Dr., Suite 
812, Reston, VA 22090. Amount: 



$1,000. Deadline: April 15. Emphasis 
on conservative point of view. Must 
show evidence of an aptitude for leader- 
ship. Must demonstrate need. Contact 
Ron Robinson, President, address above. 
How can you know all you are eligible 
for from the private sector? This is an 
enormous chore because there are so 
many sources. Now you can tap the 
world's largest computerized database of 
private award sources: over 200,000 list- 
ings covering UNDERGRADUATE, 
GRADUATE and OVERSEAS study. 
For free details, write: Financial Aid 
Finders, 77 Gristmill Rd., Randolph, NJ 
07869. 



OVERVIEW OF CHANGES TO HIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

National Direct Student Loan (NDSL) Program (Renamed "Perkins Loan" Program) 



PREVIOUSLY: 


CHANGES: 


REMAINING THE SAME: 


• Up to $3,000 for first two years, 
and up to $6,000 for entire un- 
dergraduate education 


• Up to $4,500 for the first two 
years, and up to $9,000 for en- 
tire undergraduate education 


• Must be repaid 

• Interest rate remains at 5% 

• Loan amount is based on need 
and availability of funds. 

- 


• Up to $12. (XX) for entire post- 
secondary education 


• Up to $18,000 for entire post- 
secondary education. 


• Repayment began six months 
after leaving college 


• Repayment begins nine months 
after leaving college. 


• Loan money was reduced at 
colleges where the default rate 
by former students exceeded 
10%. 


• Loan money will be reduced at 
colleges where the default rate 
by former students falls between 
7.5 and 20% 


• Loan money was eliminated 
when the default rate exceeded 
25% 


• Loan money will be eliminated 
when the default rate exceeds 
20%. 


. 


• Repayment can be waived 
because of: 

• partial/total disability 

• death 

• through participation in spe 
cial teaching programs (teach- 
ing handicapped students in 
designated low-income ele- 
mentary or specified Head- 
start programs). 



Can you 

afford to gamble 

with the LSAT, GMAT, 

GRE,or MCAT? 

Probably not. Great grades alone may 
not be enough to impress the grad 
school of your choice. 

Scores play a part. And that's how 
Stanley H. Kaplan can help. 

The Kaplan course teaches test-taking 
techniques, reviews course subjects, and 
increases the odds that you'll do the best 
you can do. 

So if you've been out of school for a 
while and need a refresher, or even if 
you're fresh out of college, do what over 1 
million students have done. Take Kaplan. 
Why take a chance with your career? 

* KAPLAN 

STANIEY H. K API AN EDUCATKDNAl CrNTR UD 

DONT COMPETE WITH 
A KAPLAN STUDENT-BE ONE 



CALL: 546-3317 or 635-3116 



Supplemental Loans for Students and Parents 



PREVIOUSLY: 


CHANGES: 




• Up to $2,500 a year for under 
graduates (amount combined 
with GSL not to exceed the 
yearly/total GSL undergraduate 
limits) . 


• Up to $4,000 a year for inde- 
pendent undergraduates 
(amount combined with any 
GSL money cannot exceed 
yearly /total GSL undergraduate 
limits) . 




• Up to $3,000 per year for grad- 
uate students to $15,000 total 


• Up to $4,000 per year for grad 
uate students to $20,000 total 


• Up to $3,000 a year/total of 
$15,000 to parents for each de- 
pendent child/undergraduate 
student 


• Up to $4,000 a year/total of 
$20,000 to parents for each de- 
pendent child/undergraduate 
student 


• Interest rate: 12% 

, 


• Interest rate: equals 91 -day 
Treasury bill plus 3 75 points 
(10. 18% as of 11/15/86 (52- 
week average]). 



Pell Grant 



PREVIOUSLY: 


CHANGES: 


REMAINING THE SAME: 


• Up to $2, 100 per year for 
undergraduates 


• Up to $2,300 in academic year 
1987 for undergraduate study 
(Thereafter, the maximum Pell 
Grant will increase $200 

annually ) 


• Does not have to be repaid 

• Awarded based on eligibility 
determined by standard 
formula 


Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) 


PREVIOUSLY: 


CHANGES: 


REMAINING THE SAME: 


• From $200 to $2,000 per year 
for undergraduates 


• From $100 to $4,000 per year 
for undergraduates. 


• Does not have to be repaid 

• Awarded based upon need, 
and funding available 




W ■ Wrestling 
WBB = Women's Basketball 
MBB = Men's Basketball 




Delaware Valley College 
1987 FEBRUARY 1987 




Sunday 



1 



Bridal Fair 

Student Center 
Reservations Required 



8 



15 




22 



Monday 



2 



MBB/Spring Garden/A/8 p.m. 
WBB/Spring Garden/ A/6 p.m. 



Tuesday 



3 



Girl Scout 

Cookies on Sale 

During Dinner! 

W/Kings/H/7 p.m. 



9 



WBB/Kings/H/7 p.m. 



16 



Washington's Birthday 

(observed) 

NO CLASSES 

Have a cool one! 

WBB/Upsala/A/7 p.m. 



10 






BODY DOUBLE 

APR • 9pm 



M 



17 



23 



24 




IX JWT BeeU u> %* 4TML«Jk. 
Pft*«ftff WW yMSET&G. 
BAP NEW*.. WF M«1 Him ""> 




Wednesday 



4 



Thursday 



5 



MBB/Scranton/A/8. 15 p.m. 
WBB/Scranton/A/6:15 p.m. 



11 



12 



Lincoln's Birthday 



Friday 



6 




Saturday 



HIGH SCHOOL 

OPEN HOUSE 

AT DVC! 

MBB/Messiah/A/8 p.m. 
W/Moravian/H/1 p.m. 



MBB/FDU/H/8 p.m. 
WBB/FDU/H/6p.m. 
W/Elizabethtown/A/7:30 p.m. 



18 



CAREER DAY 

APR • All Day 
"Dress to Impress" 

MBB/Lycoming/H/8 p.m. 
MBB-JV/6 p.m. 



Hart Recital 

during lunch time 
in the Music Room 

PUB NIGHT 

9 p.m.-l a.m. 




19 




THE KILLING FIELDS'' 

APR • 9 p.m. 



S^^lj Follow a 
Monday Schedule 
Placement Office 
Interviews 

APR 



13 



20 



14 




Valentine's Day 

W/ Western Maryland /A/2 p.m. 
MBB/Kings/A/8 p.m. 
WBB/Lycoming/A/2 p.m. 



26 



RAY BOSTON 




Vea»- BEN& JERRYS 



mwm rmwi *u »mu nnm 



Bring your suits! 
APR • 9 p.m.-l am 



SOPHOMORE 
DINNER 
DANCE 

Highpoint! 



27 



21 



MBB/Drew/H/2 p.m. 



28 



W/MAC'S/Western Maryland 



LEADERSHIP 
CONFERENCES 

Sponsored by 
DVC's Student Government 

Student Center • 9 a.m. -5 p.m. 




poRi 




^lA^-Up 




Sports Trivia '87 

Here's a matchup for all college athlet- 
ics fans. College athletics have really 
gone to the birds! Match the college with 
its correct "bird" nickname: 



1. Tempie 


A. Cardinals 


2. Kansas 


B. Blue Jays 


3. S. Carolina 


C. Blackbirds 


4. Iowa 


D. Eagles 


5. Louisville 


E. Owls 


6. Bowling Green 


F. Gamecocks 


7. Creighton 


G. Webfoots 


8. St. Joseph's 


H. Peacocks 


9. Long Island U. 


I. Jayhawks 


10. Canisus 


J. Hawkeyes 


11. Boston College 


K. Gobblers 


12. Niagra 


L. Falcons 


13. Oregon 


M. Hawks 


14. Virginia Tech 


N. Purple Eagles 


15. St. Peters 


0. Griffins 



Most correct matches wins! If there's a 
tie, the winners will go in a hat and the 
winner will be drawn. Submit all the en- 
tries to Box 951 with the * of the team 
and its matching letter or bird. Winner 
will receive a coupon for a free burger, 
fries and soda from Caesar's. You can't 
win if you don't play. 



UPDATES ON: 
Women's Basketball 

Women's Hockey 

Intramural Basketball 

Men's Basketball 

and 

Wrestling 

next week in Ram Pages! 




MUM! ITS BACK MMM 

AEROBICS 

Every Monday & Wednesday 

4:15 to 5:45 P.M. 

IN THE ALL-PURPOSE ROOM 

STARTING FEBRUARY 2 

Get a lump on summer!!! 

Look and fee/ better! 
Come out and participate! 




SPORTS' BRIEFS '87 

by John Litzke 

•For the closet dwellers: NY. Giants 
capture Super Bowl XXI with con- 
vincing 39-20 trouncing over Denver 
Broncos. Giant QB Phil Simms, who 
was 22 of 25 for 268 yds. and three 
touchdowns, was named MVP. Will 
the Gatorade showers end in '87-'88 
or will Parcells start a new line of 
Gatorade -proof coaching outfits? 

• Sixers fall seven back following loss to 
Boston. Ruland is out indefinitely and 
Toney is back to stay? Toney hits for 
team high 21 during Boston loss, but 
will scoring continue? Time to hit NBA 
center shopping list? Maybe San Diego's 
Benoit Benjamin, maybe Blab, Wenn- 
ington. Donaldson, Perkins or Tarply 
from the wealth of centers in Dallas, 
maybe Cleveland's excess of Lee, Tur- 
pin or Daugherty could be lured away? 
Moses still pumping in the points and 
grabbing the boards in DC. I wonder 
what his thoughts on the matter are? 
The Sixers are burnt, that's what he's 
thinking. 

• Stefan Edberg of Sweden beat Pat 
Cash 6-3, 6-4, 3-6. 5-7. 6-3 to win 
$1.65 million at the Australian Open 
Tennis Tourney in Melbourne. 

• Mets Ron Darling and Tim Teufel to 
appear in court this week after being 
charged with felonious aggravated as- 
sault following last year's skirmish at a 
Houston nightclub. 

• Flyers 16 points up on second place 
New York Islanders to face Buffalo on 
Wed.. Pittsburgh on Thurs. and N.Y. 
Rangers on Sat. afternoon. 

• Parrish behind the plate for Phils could 
strike fear into the hearts of New York 
and entire league. 

• Philadelphia Wings box lacrosse drops 
to 0-2 following 20-19 overtime loss to 
Baltimore Thunder (1-1) Make home 
debut tommorow night vs. New Jersey. 

• Mets pitcher Dwight pleads no contest 
and gets three years probation and 160 
hours of community service resulting 
from felony charges given following 
brawl in Tampa, Florida involving 
Gooden. 

STAFF 

Editors-in-chief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E . Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Artist Monica Etzweiler 

Reporters Mike Bolles, Missy 

Brangan, Brett Hart, Judy Henry, John 

Nicholson, Melanie O'Neill, Brian 

Taggart, Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors . . . Joe Ferry, Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 

Dr. Richard Ziemer 



High School Basketball Standings 

As of Friday 



PUBLIC 



w 



OveraN 
W L 



Frankford . . . 
Northeaet . . . 
Washington • • 

Lincoln 

Eng & Science 

CNntv 

Kensington . . 



2 
3 
3 

4 
4 
4 
b 



9 
4 

6 
5 

4 
4 



3 
8 

7 
7 
8 
6 



Penncrest 

Lower Menon . . . 
Marple Newtown 
Upper Darby . . . 
Springfield (D) . . 
Hsverford High . . 
Radnor 



1 13 



DtvWonB 



W 



Overs* 
W I 



Parkway 

Straw. Mansion 

Gratt 

Central 

Germantown . . 
M.L. King . , , . 
Roxboroogh . . . 



4 
4 
3 
2 

1 






2 
2 
3 
4 

6 
6 



7 
8 
6 
9 
6 
4 



7 
5 
9 
7 
7 
8 



5 


4 


8 


6 


5 


4 


7 


8 


4 


5 


8 


7 


4 


S 


6 


7 


2 


7 


4 


11 


1 


8 


1 


12 





9 


1 


11 



1 11 



DMsionC 



W 



OveraN 

W I 



Franklin 

F.L Center . . . 
Mastbaum . . . 

Dobbins 

Univ. City .... 

Edison 

William Penn . . 



6 
4 
4 
5 
5 

J 
1 




2 
2 
1 

1 

3 
5 



12 
8 
9 

14 
13 

8 

4 



2 
5 
6 
3 

2 

6 

11 



DrvistonD 



W 



OveraN 
W I 



West Phila. 
Southern . 
Overbrook . 

Bok 

Bertram . . 
Bodme . . . 
Lamberton 



6 
6 
4 
4 

3 
2 






2 
2 
3 
4 
5 



17 
14 
6 
6 
7 
5 
2 



2 
1 
9 
8 
7 
5 
13 



CATHOLIC 

North Division 



W 



Overall 
W L 



Card Dougherty 

La Salle 

Bish. Kennck . . 
Arch. Ryan . . . 
Bish McDevitt . 
North Cath. . . . 
Father Judge . . 
Arch Wood , . . 
Bishop Egan . . 



5 
4 
3 

3 

3 
3 
2 

1 




1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
5 
5 



11 
8 

10 
9 
8 
6 
7 
4 
3 



4 
6 
4 
5 
6 
9 
7 
11 
11 



SUB. AMER. 

Liberty Division 


League 
W L 


OveraN 
W L 




... 7 
... 6 
... 6 
... 4 
... 2 
... 


2 
3 
3 

S 
7 
9 


14 2 
10 4 
9 8 
8 9 
6 10 
6 10 


Freedom Division 


League 
W I 


OveraN 
W L 


Springfield (M) 

Upper Dublin 

Lower Moreland 


... 9 
... 6 
4 
... 4 
... 3 
. .. 3 



3 
5 
5 
6 
6 


11 2 

12 4 
10 7 

7 8 
6 8 
6 9 


SUB. NAT. 
Patriot Division 


League 
W L 


OveraN 

W L 




. . . 6 
.. . 5 

4 

4 

. . 3 

. . . 


3 
3 
5 
5 
6 
9 


7 7 
10 4 

6 9 

8 8 
6 10 
1 15 


Colonial Division 


League 
W L 


OveraN 
W L 


C.B Watt 


... 8 
... 7 



1 
2 
5 
6 
8 


13 2 

9 5 

13 4 


CB East 


... 3 
... 3 

... 1 


6 10 
8 7 
2 13 








DEL VAL 


League 
W L 


OveraN 

W I 



Southern Division 



League 
W L 



OveraN 
W L 



Sun Valley. 
Chtchestar . . . 
Chester 
Peon Wood . . 
Glen Mills . . . 
Academy Park 
Interboro . . . 
Hamton 



5 
5 

4 
4 
3 
2 
1 




1 
1 
2 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



12 
10 
11 
10 

7 
3 
5 




3 

4 

2 

4 

4 

11 

11 

13 



Roman Catholic . 
West Catholic . . 
Arch Carroll . . . 
Card O'Hara . . . 
St Josephs . . . 
Monsignor Bonner 
St J. Neumann . 
St. James 



4 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 






1 

2 
2 

2 
2 
3 

4 



12 
8 

10 
7 
7 
7 
5 
4 



3 
9 
4 
5 
6 
8 
10 
11 



CHESMONT 



League 
W L 



OveraN 
W I 



INTER AC 


League 
W L 


OveraN 
W L 


Episcopal 

Malvern 

Chestnut Hill .... 


2 

2 

1 











1 
1 

1 

2 


16 2 

10 5 
13 4 

11 7 

8 S 

6 7 


CENTRAL 


League 
W L 


OveraN 
W L 



Coatesvilte . . . 
W C Henderson 
Great Valley . . . 
O.J Roberts . . 
Dowmngtown . 
Boyertown . . . 
W C East 



6 
5 
3 
3 
3 
1 






1 

3 
3 
3 

5 
6 



11 

10 

10 

6 

3 

4 



5 
5 

7 

7 

12 

11 



1 13 



PIONEER 



League 
W L 



OveraN 
W L 



Conestoga 
Ridley .... 
Strath Haven 



9 
8 

7 





1 

2 



14 1 
11 3 
10 5 



Pottsgrove 
Upper Perkiomen 
Lansdele Cath. . . 

St Pius X 

Pottstown 

Spring-Ford . . . . 
Phoemxville . . . . 
Perk. Valley 



6 
6 

4 
4 
4 
2 
2 




1 
1 
3 
3 
3 
5 
5 
7 



13 

13 



2 
3 



6 11 
8 8 



7 
5 
3 




6 
11 
11 
11 



ORDER YOUR SEATS NOW!! 



48 Top Pros • Singles & Doubles • $465,000 Prize Money 

Tournament Champions 
1962-198* 



February 2 • 8, 
1987 



veer winner 

1962 JonDouglu 

1963 WhllneyReed 

1964 Chuck McKinlay 

1965 Charle* PMarell 

1966 Charle* Psaarell 

1967 Arthur Ath* 

1968 Manual Santana 

1969 RodLsvet 

1970 RodLaver 

1971 JohnNewcombe 

1972 Rod Law 

1973 Stan Smith 



1974 RodLaver 

1975 Marty Msaaeja 

1976 Jimmy Connor* 

1977 Dick Stockton 

1978 Jimmy Connor* 

1979 Jimmy Connor* 
'960 Jimmy Connor* 
1981 Rasm Tanner 
1903 JohnMcEnroa 

1983 JohnMcEnroa 

1984 JohnMcEnroa 
1986 JohnMcEnroa 
1986 Ivan Land! 




ticmt peter* *ao oo, *i 7 so. *i s.oo, 

• QoM hn. Soala • »225 i»25 n> dadtcMyW 

• saw Pinx swi • S200 
. A.autbla xgN nam tonot on* AN0 INCLUOCS SUM) 

mombaranip m m* Ovations Club Mr In* duration or tourna 
mom lor Patron Bo. Soot HofcJori Ontv 

pleas* mmo m tick rt* «* pouow* 



OTY 



TOTAL 



Box Seat Information 

OoM Patron Box Seels « $225 per Mat 
(S2S tax deduction*) availabl* tor the aaven day, 
eight day. eight seaaion sen** ONLY. 
Section* E. F, Q, H, I. R S, T, U. V, Row* 1-21 
Note Anyone who wishes to be Meted in tha first 
ffcre row* (temporary Mats) tor the second 
tour aeeaions, will be Mated m accord with 
their Mte ct io n tor the first four 

a) First eight rows D, J, Q. W 

b) First five row* C. K. P, X 

Silver Patron Boa Seat* « $200 per 

Avulebk* tor the aaven day, eight inaalon 

sane* ONLY 

Section* D.J.CI w Row* 8-21 
m 

OoM Patron Sea* Holder* Bonus! Receive an 

invitation to attend tha January 26 gala preview 

opening ot "TentiaaSn-Art XVI " 

includes ■**« long membership ar Ovation*, tha 
Spectrum* Pftvafe dining dub AND your name 
iistad m (he handsome toumamant program boo* 
ror m Bom See' holder* 

A limited number ot weekend packages *re avail- 
able 9 $140 par seat For m tor me l i ou can the 
Tournament Office. 215-947-2530 



Spectri 



February 2-8, 
1987 

D 'Gold Patron Box Seat* 

available % $225 per seat 
($25 tax deduct tblel 
Section* E. F G. H, l. R. 

S. T. U. V 
W ow s 1-21 tor 8 session 
series ONLY 

'Silver Patron Box Seat* 

available » $200 par seat 
I 0. J. Q W 
i 8-21 tor 8 aasaion 
I ONLY 

iTtcsrjm 

••20 00 Seat* 

Section* A. B C K, L M. 
N. O, P X. Y. Z 
1-21 



Mon 

Two. 

Wad 

Thor. 

Fn 

Sol 

Set 

Sun 



Fob 2 10 AM 
rota 3. 10 am 

Fab A <0 AM 



Fab 5 

Fob « 
Fab ! 
Fab 7 



10 Al 
3P« 

1230 0M SPM 
7 30PW WajngM 



Fob *. 1 PM « PW < Finoo) * 
Proea at ing Chorgo 
Total tncioaad 

Gold Patron Soon I 

* *22S aatn i*2S tai eaducMMi 

S»«or Patron Soatt * »2O0 oach • 
Total (ndooad 



FOR TICKET INFORMATION CALL 21S-e*7 M30 
I 



•$17 SO! 

S-16, 25-36 
1-16 
B •StS.OOSeata 

1-4, 17-24,37-40 
1-18 
Sections 4 1 80 Row* 1-5 

Subject to availability 



asMS 

ADOBf SS 
CITY 
STATC 
T€UPMON€ 

Cnorgo to O *a* ( 
OMMCare • 

MMWCord only 4 61011 IntorbaM 

BaStM 

Sajnotura 

It *ealo* by chocfc mod. ooyob*o I 
r Towwlt CO** 



seat u * pojo moooM tihhbj p o box sm 
HutrrvajoooM v«u.rr p* toooa 
At ontan BoatnartuM aha. Jan 1* wm ba itboa and land » vow 
l a v a at Spoctrum tdurt »i n d u ai No • on day ot por t ort w a nc a 
NOMPUMOa . AtOIXCHAtKM* 

For information call 215-947 2530 




€B€L US. PRO INDOOR 




DVC AT THE SIXERS 

TONEY, DOC, BARKLEY VS. 

AIR JORDAN AND CHICAGO BULLS 

TONIGHT, JANUARY 30 - BUS LEAVES AT 6 P.M. 
TICKETS - $6.00 AT DEAN TASKER'S OFFICE 





Women's hockey season underway 



Tennis at DVC could produce stars like this guy 

TENNIS AT DVC 

Yes. a spring tennis team is being 
organized here at DVC. If anyone is in- 
terested in playing spring tennis, please 
contact Jerry Fritz, Box *1133. 

ATTENTION! 

WOMEN'S INTRAMURAL FLOOR HOCKEY 

■ 

CAPTAINS AND PLAYERS - 

HAVE YOUR GAME IN RAM PAGES! 

Send teams in conflict, goal scores and team records 
to Box 951 and attract more interest to your team and 
league through Ram Pages. 



SIX WOMEN 
IS ALL IT TOOK! 

by Constantina Hajioannou 

Talk about nasty! Monday night. Jan- 
uary 26. the Sex Waxettes/Cripples 
played CYJ in women's indoor hockey. 
The roster for the teams consists of: 
CYJ 

Janice Accatatta 

Michelle Dobbs 

Kelly Hadesty 

Carol Janovski 

Regina Lynam 

Laurie Middour 

Lori Ortiz 

Joell Pursel 

Beth Risser 

Karen Vincent 

Sex Waxettes/Cripples 

Darlene Cernohorsky 
Constantina Hajioannou 
Fay Lobaugh 
Kay Lobaugh 
Margaret Schultz 
Deb Woll 

After three periods of tripping, slash- 
ing and checking, the score was 6-2, Sex 
Waxettes/Cripples came out victorious! 
Beth Risser and Joell Pursel each scored 
one for CYJ. Deb Woll scored four goals 
for SW/C, Constantina Hajioannou and 
Kay Lobaugh each contributed one goal. 
The goalies for the game were Carol 
Janovsky/Lori Ortiz for CYJ and Kay 
Lobaugh/Fay Lobaugh for SW/C. This 
was the first game of the season there- 
fore the records for the teams are: 
CYJ 0-1 & Sex Waxettes/Cripples 1-0 




Julius Erving of the Philadelphia 76'ers 






Air Jordan of the Chicago Bulls 



E 



I 



3 



Why work for 

minimum wage 

when you could 

earn $8.00/hour? 

Work part time as a PACKAGE 
HANDLER for United Parcel 
Service in Willow Grove, PA. 
Choose your starting time: 
1 PM, 5PM, 11 PM or 4 AM. 

We also have part time open- 
ings for car washers and cler- 
ical personnel. 

Applications are being ac- 
cepted Monday through Fri- 
day, 9 AM to 4 PM at the PA 
State Job Service Office, 471 
E. County Line Rd., Hatboro. 
PA, or call for information, 
443-2835. Equal Opportunity 
Employer, M/F. 




Smith grapples with Villanova Wildcat in recent 
match 

Athlete of the Week: 

This week's Athlete of the Week has 
been the National Champion at the 142 
lb. weight for the past two years. He bat- 
tles in one of the most grueling and de- 
manding sports, wrestling, but still comes 
out on top. He has a career record, regu- 
lar season and post season, of 57-0 in 
Division III. His name is Sean Smith and 
through 14 matches he carries a record 
of 14-0 with one pin for the MAC lead- 
ing DVC Aggies. With a record of 14-2. 
DVC has relied on the ability of its many 
fine wrestlers, but we'd like to highlight 
one of its best. Sean is a senior from 
Dover H.S. in Dover. PA. For his hard 
work, grappling ability and dedication, 
it's time to salute Sean Smith, our Athlete 
of the Week. Congratulations! 




NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Val's home away from home" 
SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Pitcher Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: $1 Cheesesteak 
Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

Area's Best Lunches 11 AM-3 PM 

Happy Hour 4-6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1966 



Last week's front page story "Friend From 
Abroad" refers to this young gentleman from 
Gambia. Lamm Sagnkt. 



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Answer to 
last Issue's puzzle. 





IMarmm§ Win®^ (§®flll@(g@ 



Vol. XXI. No. 16 
Friday, February 6. 1987 




Del-Valentine Lines 

on Sale NOW at 

the following locations: 

Levin Dining Hall 

Snack Bar during lunch hours 

Berk 210 
Last Chance: Monday, Feb. 9 



NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



Phil Spots Shadow 



by Bill Rein 

Last Tuesday, the famous furry meteor- 
ologist from Punxsatawney in western 
Pennsylvania, emerged from his earthen 
office to give his annual report on the 
length of this year's winter season. Recent 
weather patterns influenced this year's 
report, undoubtedly. Dr. Phil was not 
optimistic; all signs pointed to six more 
weeks of standard wintry weather. 

He illustrated this phenomenon by 
showing those present at his Punxsataw- 
ney retreat that his shadow was present 
that day, and explained that for as long 
as he can remember, this meant a longer 
winter was in store for most of the U.S. 
However, statistics kept for that period of 
time have proven inconclusive to his 
theory, causing an increasingly skeptical 



scientific community to brand the pheno- 
menon "groundhogwash" in a recent 
study in the much respected Journal of 
Meaningless Statistics. 

Professors at Delaware Valley College, 
many of whom subscribe to that publica- 
tion, believe that, contrary to Dr. Phil's 
belief, this annual ritual is merely Phil's 
way of gaining some attention for himself 
— especially the attention of female 
groundhogs. They say that this is a pro- 
duct of reproductive hormonal activity; 
Dr. Phil scoffs at that notion, though he 
does admit to being a little amorous 
around Valentine's Day — which just 
happens to come around the beginning 
of February every year, when he predicts 
the weather too. 




STUDY SAYS DVC TOP SOURCE OF Ph.D.s 



A recent study based on an examina- 
tion of productivity for all accredited insti- 
tutions whose bachelor's degree recipients 
earned Ph.D.s during a thirty year period, 
ranked Delaware Valley College fourth 
in the U.S. as a source of life science 
doctoral degree recipients. DVC had 3.8 
percent of its baccalaureate degree earn- 
ers receive these Ph.D.s during the years 
1951 through 1980. That placed it with 
Cal Tech and the University of California 
at Irvine. 

This research, published by Carol H. 
Fuller for the Great Lakes Colleges 
Association in Ann Arbor, Michigan, was 
printed in the November/December 
1986 issue of Changes. Fuller's data was 
taken from that collected by the National 
Research Council of the National Acade- 

New Outpatient Program 
for Eating Disorders 

Philadelphia's Renfrew Center, which 
specializes in the treatment of anorexia 
and bulimia, has introduced an outpatient 
program for all Delaware Valley residents. 
Comprehensive care is available for peo- 
ple seeking outpatient therapy for those 
and related disorders such as compulsive 
eating and overeating. 

The professional services include indi- 
vidual psychotherapy to help enhance 
control and self-esteem, to understand 
and manage emotions, and ultimately 
change eating behavior, according to Kim 
Hanson, of the Renfrew Center. Further- 
more, group therapy, consultations with 
physicians, nutritionists, and other special- 
ists, help the outpatient take control of 
the disorder which in the past may con- 
trol him or her. 

About six million Americans reportedly 
suffer from anorexia and bulimia; the 
Renfrew Center was established two years 
to provide resources and residential care 
for the treatment of these disorders. 

For more information about the treat- 
ment programs, call Nancy Jensen at 
(215) 482-5353. 

CAREER DAY 
FEBRUARY 18 



my of Sciences since 1920. She then cal- 
culated ratios allowing for different size 
institutions, including those awarding first 
baccalaureate degrees after 1951. It was 
the first time such a study took these size 
differences into account, for all accredited 
institutions. 

The study was undertaken to increase 
understanding of the effects of baccalau- 
reate education and the comparative 
strengths of various institutions as prepar- 
ers for post-graduate education. 

Between 1946 and 1976. 83 people 
who graduated from DVC in Biology, 
Dairy and Animal Husbandry, Ornamen- 
tal Horticulture. Horticulture, and 
Agronomy went on to receive doctoral 
degrees. 




Photo /Ram Pages files 

Bride-to-Be Dreams 
Come True at DVC 

Last Sunday, hopeful future brides 
and their families filled the Student Cen- 
ter to experience the possibilities present- 
ed to them by Anne Bailey's Bridal Fair. 
Everything the bride and groom could 
want for their wedding was presented in 
one place — from the engagement rings 
to the florist to the photographer to the 
wedding cake — making it a unique one- 
stop shopping trip which may have taken 
the hassle out of the wedding plans! 

And what marketing strategies the ex- 
hibitors offered: a fashion show for both 



MISSING YOU? 




WE NEED YOUR HELP! 

Prepare to Meet 

"The Ultimate Challenge!" 

FEBRUARY 10, 1987 

12:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. 

All Purpose Room 

OUR GOAL IS 150 PINTS! 



PLEASE GIVE BLOOD.^^ 



Blood donation sign-up sheets are available in the Residence 
Life Office, in the Snack Bar area of the Student Center, and 
the dorms. 




Photo/Ram Pages files 

men and women to admire, with eye- 
catching models and mannequins that 
came to life — really the hard work of 
trained freeze-frame models! 

Though the show was open to those 
who made prior reservations, it seemed 
like the crowd was over the capacity 
allowed for the APR and exhibits were 
even set up in the Snack Bar. This tight 
situation brought some comment from 
those present that felt it may need to be 
toned down a bit for safety as well as en- 
joyment of those present — DVC staff 
and the business people included. This 
has been an annual complaint of the fair 
proving that it was a popular event for 
the college. 



* ALERT • 

February 18, 1987 
IS CAREER DAY 

Additional Information 
Next Issue! 



• 



This Week on 

is * 



Campus 



2nd floor 



by Wendy L. Unger 
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6 

TGinn 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7 

DVC Open House 

MBB (A) vs. Messiah, 8 p.m 

W (H) vs. Moravian 1 p.m 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8 

Day of R & R — take advantage 1 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2 

WBB(H) vs. Kings. 7 p.m. 
Ram Pages meeting. 7 p.m 
of Student Center 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10 

Hood Drive, DVC Student Center. 
APR. 12 p.m. - 5 p.m. Accept tfie 
challenge! Give blood — save a le 

Film: "Body Doubte" 9 p.m in the 
APR 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1 1 

MBB (H) vs. FDU, 8 pm 

WBB (HJ vs. FDU, 6 p.m. 

W (A) vs. Elteabethtown, 7:30 p 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12 

Harp Recital. Musk: Room. Student 
Center 12 - 1 p.m 

Abe's B<lay 

CaesartPub, 9pr i m 




MONEY-FOR-COLLEGE 



by Irving Bender 

Q. My daughter has not been able to 
begin college due to money difficulties. I 
have applied for government grants 
(SEOG & Pell), but was denied funds. 
(J.M.H., IL) 

A. She may be eligible for government 
loans although not grants. Also, find out 
what aid schools offer to their own stu- 
dents. Your daughter also qualifies for 
private sector awards based on factors in 
your background including: gender, field 
of study, career goals, and many more. 

Here is a private source award your 
daughter is eligible for regardless of her 
field of study: if a parent is a veteran: 
American Legion Auxiliar National Head- 
quarters (American Legion Auxiliary Na- 
tional President's Scholarships), 777 N. 
Meridian, Indianapolis, IN 46204. 
Amount: $1,500 - $2,000. Deadline: 
March 15. Parent must be a vet, student 
must not have attended college at time of 
award. 

How can you know all you are eligible 
for? This is an enormous chore because 
there are so many independent sources. 
You can tap the world's largest compu- 
terized database of private award sources: 
over 200,000 listings covering UNDER- 
GRADUATE, GRADUATE, and OVER- 
SEAS study. For free details, write: Fi- 
nancial Aid Finders, 77 Gristmill Rd., 
Randolph, NJ 07869. 



ON THE TOWN 

A GUIDE 

TO WHAT'S HAPPENING 

IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

Editor's Note: Ram Pages receives about 
a half-dozen news releases per week, con- 
cerning different cultural happenings 
coming up in this area. Now, we hope to 
put them to better use by providing the 
reader with a more diverse and maybe 
educating supplement to the events of- 
fered at DVC. We hope that this will be- 
come a regular addition to your weekly 
paper. 

• Valentine's Day Party at the Zoo 

Love notes for a llama, poems for pen- 
guins, and any other animal sentiments 
for your favorite furry, feathered, or scaled 
friend will enable kids under 12 to be ad- 
mitted free to the Philadelphia Zoo on 
Saturday, February 14. 

From noon to 4 p.m. the Sixth Annual 
WTAF-TV Valentine's Day Party will in- 
clude musicians, jugglers, and mimes, 
plus a few cartoon character surprises. 
Plan to join the festivities. 

• Closely Watched Films - 
International Film Series 

Closely Watched Films will open its 
ten-film spring season on Thursday, Fe- 
bruary 12, with "El Norte"; This film is an 
"unforgettable blend of drama and dream 
imagery," beginning in the mountain 
jungles of Guatemala. Two young people 
seek a better life in America as they see 
their world crumble. 

"El Norte" will be shown at 7:30 p.m. 
in the James-Lorah House Auditorium, 
132 North Main Street, Doylestown. 

Coming up later will be three films to 
be shown at the County Theatre on East 
State Street. 

Each film of this series will be preceded 
by a classic or experimental film short 
subject. Doors open at 7 p,m; The Cor- 
ner Store serves fresh coffee, tea, and 
baked goods until showtime. 



Q. I am national of another country 
enrolled at an American college studying 
biology and chemistry. I don't know 
whether I qualify for any private scholar- 
ships. (J.R., KS) 

A. Many private source awards do not 
require U.S. citizenship, but only fulltime 
study at an accredited college. You quali- 
fy for additional awards based on your 
country of origin , field of interest — and 
many other factors. 

Here is a private source award you are 
eligible for: Society for the Advancement 
of Materials and Process Engineering 
(SAMPE-SCHOLARSHIP AWARD) 
P.O. Box 2459, Covina, CA 91722. 
Amount: $1,000. Deadline: January 31. 
Must be formally recommended by ad- 
visor or department head. Scholarships 
not available to seniors. Must be matricu- 
lating in a subject related to materials and 
processes. Contact: Marge Smith, at the 
above address. 

How can you know all you are eligible 
for from the private sector? This is an 
enormous chore because there are so 
many sources. Now you can tap the 
world's largest computerized database of 
private award sources: over 200,000 
listings covering UNDERGRADUATE, 
GRADUATE, and OVERSEAS study. 
For free details, write: Financial Aid 
Finders, 77 Gristmill Rd., Randolph, NJ 
07969. 



Single Admissions are $3.50; Student 
Memberships are $15.00. Call 345-5663 
on evenings for details. 

• Villanova Theatre 
Presents Comedy- Mystery 

Joe Orton's comedy, "What the Butler 
Saw," will be presented February 11 
through Hand 18 through 21 at 8 p.m., 
with a Sunday matinee on February 22 
beginning at 2 p.m. Ticket prices range 
from $7 to $9 with special student 
rates. Call 645-7474 for details. Villanova 
University is located at County Line and 
Spring Mill Roads in Villanova, PA. 

"What the Butler Saw" is classic farce 
— a respected psychiatrist finds himself 
in the predicament of hiding a naken sec- 
retary from his jealous wife ... all the 
while coping with a drugged policeman 
and a deranged doctor. Mistaken identi- 
ties and mysterious disappearances are 
the order of the day. 

• Riverfront Dinner Theatre 
Serving "Grease" 

"Grease"is playing by the Delaware 
River until March 29, 1987. Call (215) 
925-7000 for details and reservations. 

• Philadelphia Drama Guild 
Premiers "Playwrights of 
Philadelphia" Play Festival 

Philadelphia's major professional thea- 
tre will be showing world premiers of three 
plays by three native Philadelphia play- 
wrights, in repertory at the Harold Prince 
and Studio Theatres of the Annenberg 
Center from March 3 through March 15, 
1987. See upcoming On The Town for 
details. 

• Day Long Symposium on Greek Era 
at the University of Perm Museum 

Archeologists, historians, and human- 
ists will join forces at "Recreating the 
World of Philip of Macedon and Alexan- 
der the Great" on Saturday, February 7, 
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Refreshments and a 
reception are included. $35 for students. 
Call 898-3042 for details. 




in Response: 

Agriculture NOT 

a Dirty Word 

Dear Editors, 

It has been proposed to take agriculture 
out of the school's name. While Dr. 
Blumenfield has brought up some interest- 
ing ideas, 1 cannot agree with this plan. 
Student recruiting problems should not 
be blamed on misconceptions associated 
with the school's name. However, Dr. 
Blumenfield is correct in that admissions 
personnel should be well-paid, person- 
able, technical sales representatives. 
Representatives should receive bonuses 
when they get results and released when 
they don't. The problems that I see as 
"student recruiting problems" are the high 
tuition and the lack of school promotion. 
If these areas could be improved, I'm 
sure enrollment would go up. 

Why change the school's name, DVC 
is already known for producing leaders in 
agriculture. We need to develop our other 
departments to match the reputation and 
to be better than other colleges. This 
would draw in students, not changing 
our name. 

As for agriculture becoming a dirty 
word^ do not agree. George Washington 
once said, "Agriculture is the most health- 
ful, the most useful, and the most noble 
employment of man." This is still, as far 
as I can tell, the general public's opinion. 

I'm proud of our school's agricultural 
tradition and the school's name. I am a 
Horticulture major at Delaware Valley 
College of Science and AGRICULTURE 
and that's what I want it to say on my 
diploma. 

Sincerely, 
Robert S. Deemer 



PHILADELPHIA 
FLOWER SHOW 

The Way We Were . . . 

Tickets on Sale 
., At Lasker Hall Receptionist 

MARCH 8-15, 1987 
ADULT - $6.75 

It's not too early 
to start planning for March! 




Lost & Found Articles 

These articles may be picked up at the 

Dean of Student's Office. 

Misc. Keys 

3 General Motors Keys 

2 Ford Car Keys 

Subaru Car Keys 

Chrysler Car Keys 

(found in Goldman 2nd) 

Honda Car Keys 

Sadd Key Chain 

Clothing 

Black & White Scarf 

(found in Dining Hall) 

Black Jacket & Backpack in Mandell 

Miscellaneous Gloves 

Book Bag 

Jewelry, Etc. 

Ring 

Monogrammed Tie Clip with Stone 

Timex Watch 

Glasses 

Umbrella 

Sunglasses 

Covered Wagon Charm 

Earrings 

Records 



From . . . 
the Krauskopf Library 

Don't let your friend talk you into us- 
ing your library card. YOU are responsible 
for ALL materials checked out under 
your name. That means that YOU are 
billed for the fines if the book is returned 
late and that YOU must pay for the book 
if it is lost. 

Please Note Library Hours: 

FEB. 13 - 8:30 to 4:30 p.m. 

FEB. 14 - 12:00 to 3:00 p.m. 

FEB. 15- 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. 

Otherwise, regular hours are scheduled 

for the rest of February. 

Now you can read the Sunday New 
York Times on Sunday at the Library. 
We are having it delivered rather than 
mailed. 






(Rev.cMartin L.King 



father ^Divine 

Book Sellers Honor 
Black History Month 



cMalcolm X 



Hard to find favorites about black 
Americans are available this February, 
Black History Month, at Friends of the 
Free Library (FFLP) used bookstore. 
This very special collection includes works 
by James Baldwin, Dick Gregory, Alex 
Haley, and Martin Luther King. 

FFLP used bookstore, located in 30th 
Street Station, is also offering a selection 
of new books at used book prices. These 



books are slightly older, new copies that 
have never been previously owned . FFLP 
continues its paperback booksale. Select 
from thousands of books at hard to beat 
prices! 

All proceeds from book sales will bene- 
fit FFLP, whose programs support educa- 
tion and literacy throughout the city. 
Come on down! Buy a book and expand 
your world! 






cMarcus Qarvey 



'Frederick ^Douglass 



Le^Roi Jones 




LACROSSE '87 
TAKING SHAPE 

The 1987 lacrosse season is quickly 
approaching. The Delaware Valley Col- 
lege Lacrosse team is swiftly preparing to 
meet the challenge of the many hard-hit- 
ting opponents that they shall encounter. 
With one season under his belt, Hank 
Kasprzak tending the goal, Del Val will 
face sharp-shooting opponents like Millers- 
ville, Temple, and Ursinus. Del Val will 
field a team of seasoned veteran mid- 
fielders that include Mark Beshinges, Juan 
Desouza, Bob Sauer, Vince Coviello, 
and Tom Await. Spear-heading Del Val 
offense will be attackmen Jim DeCoursey, 
Tom Hertler, and Roy Woytas. With an 
opening game against Trenton State Uni- 
versity on March 27 here on the home 
turf, Del Val should be well prepared to 
meet the onslaught. 

The team is presently holding intramur- 
als in the gym to help members prepare 
for the 1987 season. Anyone interested 
in playing during regular season or during 
the indoor intramurals, should contact 
any lacrosse player. So come out and 
give the team the much needed support, 
for this should be an exciting season. 
Any questions, please contact Jim 
DeCoursey, Work 112, P.O. Box 1230. 

1987 Lacrosse Schedule 

3/27 Trenton State Univ. Home 2 pm 

4/ 1 Acad, of New Church Away 4 pm 

4/4 Temple University Away ? 

4/11 MUleravUle Univ. Away 2 pm 

4/12 Masters LacroMe Club Home 2 pm 

4/15 Acad, of New Church Home 4 pm 

4/22 Ursinus State Univ Home 4 pm 

4/26 Moravian Home 2 pm 

5/2 Temple University Home 2 pm 




MUM! ITS BACK MMM 

AEROBICS 

Every Monday & Wednesday 

4:15 to 5:45 P.M. 

IN THE ALL-PURPOSE ROOM 

STARTING FEBRUARY 2 

Get a lump on summer!!! 

Look and feel better! 
Coma out and participate 1 . 




^ia-j-Up 



MEN SPLIT ON WEEKEND TRIP; 
FALL FROM PLAYOFF PICTURE 



by John Litzke 

A seemingly very successful season for 
the Delaware Valley men's basketball has 
turned a bit sour as of late, and in a real 
heartbreaking kind of way. 

A very talented DVC team, led by jun- 
ior center John Boone and sophomore 
guard Joe Butts who were both ranked 
nationally in Division III field goal percen- 
tage, rolled in to Selingrove to face the 
4-10, 4-4 Crusaders of Susquehanna. It 
would be an uncharacteristically poor 
shooting evening for the Aggies as DVC 
hit for only six field goals in the first half 
and 20/56 shooting overall in a 54-53 
defeat that stung for a while. The stingy 
part about the whole thing was that DVC 
had the opportunity to capture the ball 
game trailing 54-53 with :11 left in the 
game and the ball in the hands of DVC. 
Sophomore forward Dwight Weldon 
was the lone spark for DVC with 19 while 
senior center Bruce Merklinger had 19 
and freshman Jim Burke added 13. 

Off we were to Juniata, looking for a 
win over the Indians to make this long 
road trip worth while. And win is what 
they did, and in impressive fashion too. 
Five DVC players scored in double figures; 
Weldon (11), Butts (10), Ford (15), in- 
cluding three three-pointers, and Jones 
(12), but the most outstanding perfor- 
mance was put in by freshman forward 
Mike Sturynowicz who came off the bench 
to score 18 clutch points which included 
two three-pointers and added three steals. 
DVC basked in their 75-71 victory while 




Guard Dwight Weldon hits "J" over defender 




raising their record to (9-6, 5-3). Wayne 
Paul's 30 and Les Squair's 19 were highs 
for Juniata. 

January 26 vs. Moravian: The Grey- 
hounds were punched out quite easily 
this eve as freshman forward John Jones 
had a sensational outpouring in a season 
high 3 1 and ten rebounds to pace DVC 
over Moravian 81-66. DVC took a com- 
manding 40-28 lead into the dressing 
room and never looked back. It was a 
gem of a game for DVC as pluses includ- 
ed just four personal fouls in the first half, 
a 36-20 rebounding edge and 35/60 
shooting from the field. Other leaders for 
DVC included Weldon with 17, Boone 
with 12, and Butts with nine assists. 
Moravian was led by Mike Dougherty 
with 23 and Carl Clevenstine with 12. 

January 28 vs. Scranton: Before a 
packed house in Work Gym, the na- 
tionally ranked Scranton Royals came in 
and, I suppose, had really no perception 
of what they were up against and what 
they were in for. This was the game of 
the year and probably the game of the last 
20 years as far as DVC basketball goes. 
(The victory over Scranton in '85 at 
Scranton is a close second.) Trailing by 
seven at the half at 35-28, DVC stormed 
back with a sense of purpose and inten- 
sity that I have rarely seen. 

At 14:28 down by a score of 49-40 on 
a three-pointer by Shawn Gallagher. 
DVC ran off on a 15-4 spurt that climaxed 
on a three-pointer by junior guard Eric 
Ford and gave DVC the lead at 55-53 at 
the 9: 19 mark of the game. DVC would 
hold that lead until the 1:52 mark of the 
game when Scranton tied it at 66 on two 
fouls by John Paul Andrejko. With 1:41 
left. Ford hit a big jumper to propel DVC 
back in front 68-66. Three turnovers later, 
guard Joe Butts has the chance to ice it 
shooting 1-1 with :48 left but misses the 
front end. On the following trip down, 
junior Arthur Trippet is fouled and goes 
to the line shooting 1-1 and . . . hits both 
to tie it. Damn. Then DVC almost dug 
their own grave when the ball was turned 
over with :25 remaining, Scranton came 
down. Trippet was fouled and shooting 
1-1 with :01 remaining. Double Damn. 
But no. Trippet missed the front end. 
Boone rebounded and . . . overtime. 
Another ray of hope. The ray would cloud 
over though as a jumper by Gallagher 
with :12 left would prove to be enough 
as Scranton outscored DVC in the over- 
time 9-5 to win the Thrilla 'n Jimmy 
Worka, 77-73. Paving the way for DVC 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home away from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: 12-HorseAle 
Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: $1 Cheesesteak 
Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

Areo's Best Lunches 11 AM -3 PM 

Happy Hour 4 ■ 6:30 PM 

Rt 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



was Eric Ford with 17 including four 
three-pointers, Dwight with 14, Butts 
with 13 including three three-pointers 
and Boone with 10. Gallagher had a 
game high 27 for the Royals (14-3, 8-1), 
Andrejko added 18, and Bob DiGenova 
had 14. 




Boone (42). Dudley discuss pregame strategy 

January 31 vs. Wilkes: With MAC 
Playoff hopes at stake, DVC took on the 
(7-7. 5-5) Wilkes Colonels who DVC beat 
handily earlier this season. DVC took a 
one-point lead at the half 36-35 but 
would falter in the end to give Wilkes the 
77-75 upset victory and virtually end any 
hope of post-season play for DVC. Con- 
sidering that in the college's 100 plus 
year history, post-season play for DVC 
men's basketball has been as foreign as 
residents of Mars enrolling. DVC can keep 
their heads high for they got a taste of 
what is to come, in what I think will be a 
playoff them in the next one to three 
years. And with seven games still remain- 
ing in the season, anything can happen! 

February 2 vs. Spring Garden: DVC 
came out of the games like they were 
shot out of a canon. Shooting 24/32 
(75%) from the field in the first half. 
DVC went into the locker room with a 
51-42 advantage which was spuned on 
by Weldon's 12, Cherry's 10, and eight 
each for Jones and Boone. The Bobcats 
were led by their main man, Dave Duda, 
who scored his 1000th career point in 
Spring Garden's previous game vs. Penn 
State. Capitol, with 15 and forward Paul 
Moyer added eight. DVC held the lead 
till the 13:13 mark of the final period 
when Moyer hit a three-pointer to make 
it 61-59. From then on DVC had to play 
catch up ball and fell short by a score of 
85-82. Duda finished with 30 and Sean 
Givnish had 20 including three three- 
pointers for the victors. DVC (10-9, 6-5) 
received fine performances from forward 
Dwight Weldon (21), Joe Cherry (17). 
and sophomore guard Joe Butts, who 
completed a feat, a rarity on any level of 
basketball. Butts had a triple-double with 
13 points, 12 assists, and ten rebounds. 
The win gave Spring Garden a record of 
500 at (9-9). 

STAFF 

Editorsin-Chief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Reporters Mike Bolles, Melanie 

O'Neill, Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 




SPORTS' BRIEFS '87 

by John Litzke 

• Moses goes 3-0 vs. Sixers following 
Saturday night's 106-105 win in Wash- 
ington. Moses hit the two fouls in the 
end to win it. 

• Flyers remain atop Patrick Division 
with 72 points, 14 ahead of second 
place NY. Islanders. Will take on New 
Jersey Saturday at 1 : 35 on channel 57. 

• Ex-Phillie pitcher Steve Carlton, with- 
out a job, is reported to be asking San 
Diego Padre manager and ex-Phillie 
shortstop Larry Bowa, for permission 
to attend Padres training camp. 

•Super scout Hugh Alexander leaves 
Phillies for good and signs up with 
Dallas Green and company in Chicago. 
With Ron Cey and his humungous sal- 
ary sent to Oakland to form the highest 
paid designated hitter duo with Reggie 
Jackson, Chicago is looking for third 
base help. New York Met Ray Knight is 
pondering on a $500,000, one-year 
deal with Baltimore. Boston Red Sox 
on the verge of losing a lot of players to 
free-agency. And the Lance Parrish — 
Bill Giles saga continues. 

• North Carolina guard Kenny Smith to 
be out two weeks to undergo arthro- 
scopic surgery on his knee. 

• In the America's Cup, U.S. boat Stars 
and Stripes won the fourth race to bring 
the Cup back to the United States after 
its three year absense. 

• Associated Press and UP1 Basketball 
Polls as of February 3. 1987: 



AP 


UPI 


l.UNLV 


l.UNLV 


2. Indiana 


2. Indiana 


3. North Carolina 


3. North Carolina 


4. Iowa 


4. Iowa 


5. Depaul 


5. Temple 


6. Temple 


6. Purdue 


7. Purdue 


7. Depaul 


S.Oklahoma 


8. Oklahoma 


9. Alabama 


9. Alabama 


10. Georgetown 


10. Georgetown 


1 1 . Syracuse 


1 1 . Syracuse 


12.Clemson 


12.TCU 


13. Pittsburgh 


13.Clemson 


14. Illinois 


14. Illinois 


15TCU 


15. Duke 



• Joe Paterno and national champ Penn 
State visit Ronald Reagan at the White 
House. Does Joe have a future in 
politics? 

• Here are the standings in pro box la- 
crosse as of February 3. 1987: 

NJ Saints, 3W, 1L, 61PF, 54PA 
Bait. Thunder 1W. 1L. 33PF, 35PA 
Phil. Wings 1W. 2L, 44PF, 42PA 
Wash. Wave 1W, 2L, 45PF, 52PA 

• Ebel U.S. pro indoor tennis has begun 
at the Spectrum. 



CAREER DAY 
FEBRUARY 18 




Sports Trivia '87 

In the late 70's the Philadelphia 76er's 
had many a championship battle with the 
Portland Trailblazers. In 1978 the two 
teams met in the NBA finals. Can you 
name the starting lineup for the 1978 
NBA champion Portland Trailblazers? 

No one got question * 1 , the stumper 
where it was asked if you could match 
the former ABA teams with their respec- 
tive cities. And here's how it went: 

Sports Quit Answers 

1 . E Minnesota Muskies 

2. J Pittsburgh Condors 

3. G Anaheim Amigos 

4. A Los Angeles Stars 

5. H Dallas Chaparrels 

6. K Houston Mavericks 

7. B Miami Floridians 

8. N Carolina Cougars 

9. M New Jersey Americans 

10. C New Orleans Buccaneers 

11. O Washington Capitals 

12. I Memphis Pros 

13. F San Diego Conquistadors 

14. D Oakland Oaks 

15. P Baltimore Claws 

16. L Virginia Squires 

If you know the answer to this week's 
trivia, place your answer, your name, 
and your box number on a slip of paper 
and have it placed into Box 951. If your 
correct entry is chosen, you'll be the win- 
ner of a free coupon for a burger, fries, 
and pepsi from Caesar's Pub. They're 
always good while watching your favorite 
game on the big screen TV. And 
remember, you can't win if you don't 
play. 




MENS WINTER TRACK 

LEHIGH MEET 
Steve Caffey 

5th in 60-yard Dash, 6.8 

2nd in Long Jump, 20'7" 

2nd in Triple Jump, 38 '6* 
Charles Delancy 

High Jump, 5 '6" 

6th in 60 High Hurdles, 9.1 

Triple Jump, 35 '8" 
Phil Sperry 

3rd in High Hurdles, 8.52 

3rd in Long Jump, 18 '6" 
Kevin Dickmyer — 60-yard Dash, 6.64 
Tony Donofrio — 3 mile, 17.11 
Mark Brinsky 

4th in 60 High Hurdles, 8.6 
Tom Allen - 440, 57.35 
Hardy Rueb - 4th in 600, 1.18 
Delaney, Allen, Brinksy, Vogeler 

Mile Relay Team, 3.40 
Rueb, Dickmyer, McDaid, Benner 

1st in Distance Medlay Relay, 
11.19.46 
Mark Vogeler - Triple Jump, 3b' W 

Next meet for men & women's track 
was Feb. 5, 6 p.m. at Haverford College. 



Intramural Basketball 
Explodes Into Action 

by John Litzke 

INTRAMURAL STANDINGS 
(after 2 games) 

Green W L % 

Running Rebels 2 1.000 

Gargoyles 1 1.000 

Terps 1 1.000 

Blue Demons 1 1 .500 

Aboho 1 .000 

E.M.O. 1 .000 

Wolf Pack 2 .000 

Gold W L % 

Double Stuff 2 1.000 

Psychotic Hoop 1 1.000 

Bambino Magicians 1 1 .500 

Running Rabbi's 1 1 .500 

Space Between 1 .000 

Boffers 2 .000 

Thursday's (1/29) Gaines 
Blue Demons 57, Running Rabbi's 47 
Double Stuff 74, Boffers 26 
Running Rebels 57, E.M.O. 41 
Bambino Magicians 46, Wolf Pack 35 

Monday's (2/2) Games 
Psychotic Hoop 37, Space Between 36 
Gargoyles 49, Wolf Pack 33 
Running Rabbi's 72, Aboho 23 
Double Stuff 83, Blue Demons 57 
Running Rebels 70, B. Magicians 45 
Terps 56, Boffers 37 



Psychotic 
Hoop 

Wheaton 15 
Widwer 2 

Hubbard 4 

Stanton 1 1 

Vandeberghe 3 
McSherry 2 

TOTAL 37 



Space 
Between 



Snader 

Bachur 

Boltz 

Bittner 

Hatch 

Pierce 

Martella 

Trump 

TOTAL 



2 
4 

14 
4 
2 
8 
2 
4 

36 



Gargoyles 

Mucci 6 

Herring 20 

Hepner 6 

Cooper 5 

Hartung 8 

Butcher 4 

TOTAL 49 



Wolff Pack 



Running 
Rabbi's 

Stamm 10 

Gambone 1 1 

Gilbert 21 

Cimohowski 4 

Clair 6 

L. Burkhart 2 

Wisenberg 18 

TOTAL ' 72 



Running 
Rebels 

Kennedy 12 

Arnold 6 

Leinbach 10 

B. Boyle 21 

C.Boyle 11 

Brennan 4 

Rother 6 

TOTAL 70 

Double Stuff 



McGlone 

Hogan 

Courts 

Powell 

Albany 

Pietrefesa 

Shilling 

J. Burkhart 

Seidel 

TOTAL 



Aboho 

Fritsche 

Anthony 

Rueb 

Miller 

Mills 

Donnelly 

TOTAL 



4 
4 

17 

3 
2 
2 

1 

33 



8 
2 
8 
1 

4 
23 



Zendt 

Keich 

J. Wilson 

Nolan 

Ellison 

C. Wilson 

Treffinger 

Savoy 

TOTAL 



19 
17 

6 
10 

6 

3 
17 

7 
85 



Bambino 
Magicians 

Moran 21 

Butterworth 10 
Sukeena 8 
Koperna 4 
D'Ambra 2 
Zaborowski 
TOTAL 45 



Blue Demons 

Sterling 45 
Hower 

Reaver 6 

Zellers 

Williams 4 
Lewandowski 2 
TOTAL 57 




Terps 

Perry 4 

Lewandowski 14 



Reigel 

Zecchino 

Reiser 

McKeough 

McDyer 

TOTAL 



2 
22 
6 

8 
56 



Boffers 

Mellema 

White 

Martinelli 

Ford 

Hamm 

Vjnitsky 

TOTAL 




8 
2 
4 
4 
19 
37 



SCORING LEADERS 



Name & Team 

Sterling, BD 
Zecchino, Terps 
Herring, Gar. 
Vinitsky, Boff 
Zendt, DS 
Wisenberg, R. Rabbi 
Moran, BM 
Rothmaller, DS 
B. Boyle, R. Rebels 
Gilbert, R. Rabbi 
Courts, WP 
Wheaton, PH 

REBOUNDING 
Name & Team 

Sterling, BD 
Treffinger, DS 
Nolan, DS 
Schade, EMO 
Butterworth, BM 
White, Boff 
Herring, Gar. 
Kennedy, R. Rebels 
Moran, BM 
Gilbert, R. Rabbi 
Stamm, R. Rabbi 



G 

2 

1 

1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 



Total Avg. 

76 38.0 



22 
20 
19 
37 
34 
33 
16 
32 
32 
34 
15 



22.0 
20.0 
19.0 
18.5 
17.0 
16.5 
16.0 
16.0 
16.0 
15.5 
15.0 



LEADERS 

G Total Avg. 

2 40 20.0 

2 34 17.0 

1 16 16.0 

1 16 16.0 

2 27 13.5 
1 13 13.0 

1 11 11.0 

2 19 9.5 
2 18 9.0 
2 ' 18 9.0 
2 17 8.5 



J.V. Raises Record to 6-2 

Thrash VFMI 

Done In By Royals 

by John Litze 

Besides Scranton's Varsity winning the 
overtime thriller last Wednesday, the 
Junior Varsity made it a clean sweep and 
an even more pleasant ride home as the 
Scranton J.V., behind Bob Stoffel (15) 
and John Neylon (12) beat the Delaware 
Valley J.V. 85-61. Leading DVC were 
Ron Slutsky with 15 on five three-pointers 
and Mike Sutrynowicz with eight. It was 
a sloppily played game with Scranton 
leading at the half 43-28 and holding on- 
to it for the "W". 

And then there was the Privates and 
Lieutenants from the Valley Forge Mili- 
tary Academy visiting the J.V. Saturday 
night just before the Wilkes-Delaware 
Valley Varsity matchup. With 5:00 left in 
the half, VFMI mustered only two points 
and went in at halftime down by 32 at 
42-10. Leading the massacre for DVC 
was Joe Brown with eight and John 
"Swede" Wiorek and Jeff Boob each 
with six while Jerome Henderson hit all 
ten points for VFMI. 

Much of the same continued and with- 
out much further rambling and descrip- 
tion the final was 98-33. Joe Brown 
finished with 20, Jeff Bobb with 13, and 
Mike Dahon and Mark Reason each com- 
piled ten. Twyman and Henderson each 
had ten. 



LADIES' SKY TURNS CLOUDY: FALL TO 5-12 



by John Litzke 




The 1986-87 women's- basketball cam- 
paign hasn't unfolded the way which 
Coach Gary Pento and the Lady Aggies 
hoped in the preseason. After a strong 
Gaullaudet Tourney showing in which 
DVC finished a strong second , the strug- 
gling Lady Aggies find themseles staring 
at a 5-11 record with only six games 
remaining. 

"We're still a young team," said Head 
Coach Gary Pento. "And being a young 
team we're making some young team mis- 
takes, but all that should change as the 
season's move on. The morale of the 
players is very good and we're just going 
to have to keep working hard." 

Senior Darcel Estep (16.2 avg.), sopho- 
more Tammy Petraskie (11.8 avg.), fresh- 
man Michele Shirk (13.4 avg), and fresh- 
man Laura Rotz (7.3 avg.) have been 
bright spots for DVC. Here is a synopsis 
of the Ladies' games to date, starting 
with game one. 

December 2 vs. Upsala: The 
Ladies jumped all over the Lady Vikings 
with five players in double figures; Yoder 
(18). Estep (17), Long (14), Rotz (14), 
and Smith (10) in their 94-46 pounding 
of Upsala. DVC led at the half 42.-16 
and never looked back. DVC raised their 
record to 3-1 and dropped Upsala to 0-2. 
December 4 vs. Drew: DVC grabbed 
a 29-21 halftime lead and would never 
relinquish it as the Lady Aggies went on 
to trounce the Lady Rangers 73-41. DVC 
(3-1) was led by senior Darcel Estep with 
18, Tammy Petraskie with 15, Laura Rotz 
with 13, and Stacy Yoder with 10. Drew 
was led by J. Geiser with 11 and D. 
Clarke with eight. 

December 6 vs. Misericordia: In 
the friendly confines of Work Gym, the 
Ladies faced the Lady Lions of Misericor- 
dia and fell behind at the half 39-33. 
Showing the ultimate amount of skill, 
speed, and poise, DVC battled back to 
erase the deficit and pull out a nine-point 
victory 72-63 fueled by Fifi's season high 
24, Tammy's 19, and Michele Shirk's 15. 
Misericordia was led by Stetzar with 28 
and Greco with 14. 



December 8 vs. Moravian: Off to a 

very fine 4-1 start, the Ladies suffered their 
first major MAC setback as Moravian's 
always tough Lady Greyhounds visited. 
DVC hung close at halftime trailing by 
only four at 38-34 with Fifi leading the 
way with 10 and Shirk added seven going 
into the lockers. It was the lack of offen- 
sive rebounding and faulty inbounds pass- 
ing that hurt the Lady Aggies in the first 
half. Moravian sped out in the second 
half with an 8-0 start and a semi-com- 
manding 12-point lead at 46-34. DVC 
would climb back as the half grew older 
and got to within six at 56-50 on field 
goals by Petraskie, Fifi, and Yoder. That 
is when Moravian turned on the boosters 
and with under nine minutes left, sported 
leads of 11 and 13 and went on to vic- 
tory 78-65. Leading the way for DVC 
was Tammy with a team high 20, and Fifi 
with 16 points, seven assists, and four 
steals. Guard Etta Smith displayed her 
fine ability with eight points and ten 
assists while Michele Shirk grabbed a 
team high ten rebounds. Moravian con- 
trolled the boards, however, as they lead 
42-28 in that category. Leading the way 
for the Lady Greyhounds was Adams 
with 22, Tretheway with 15, and Greene 
with 13. 

December 10 vs. Scranton: DVC 
fell to (4-3) following their humbling de- 
feat at the hands of the Scranton Lady 
Royals 98-49. Down by 17 at the half at 
40-23, DVC fought and fought and 
fought but defending champion Scranton 
was just too much. DVC got 15 from 
Shirk and nine from Fifi. The victorious 
Royals received 23 from Parks and 23 
from Ritz. 

January 8 vs. Albright: The female 
Lion's roar is the loudest and most fierce 
in the wild . The Albright Lady Lion's roar 
was felt here when they stalked into 
DVC. looking for its prey, and finding it 
in a tough 70-66 victory over the Lady 
Aggies. The Lionesses found the Aggies' 
jugular with high output from Koch with 
21 and Landis with 13. DVC didn't go 
down without a fight and a last struggle 
for survival and were led by Fifi with 22 
and Shirk with 17. 




Fifi headfakes in the lane. 



DVC WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 1986-87 
13-GAME STATISTICS 



NAME 



GAMES FGFGA % FT-FTA 



PTS AVG. A ST. REBS. AVG 



Darcell Estep 


13 


94 191 


49 2 


23- 


30 


766 


211 


16 2 


60 


30 


73 


56 


Tammy Petraskie 


13 


68-158 


43.0 


18- 


35 


514 


154 


11.8 


9 


16 


86 


6 1 


Michelle Shirk 


13 


73-133 


548 


29 


42 


690 


175 


134 


11 


40 


106 


8 1 


Laura Rotz 


13 


46-110 


41.8 


3- 


6 


500 


95 


7.3 


35 


26 


35 


26 


Etta Smith 


13 


29- 58 


500 


7- 


15 


466 


65 


50 


55 


33 


20 


15 


Stacy Yoder 


13 


26- 54 


48 1 


6- 


12 


50.0 


58 


4.4 


10 


7 


22 


16 


Lisa Long 


13 


20- 63 


31 .7 


25 


32 


78.1 


65 


5.0 


9 


19 


39 


30 


Rhonda Hill 


13 


10- 28 


35 7 


4- 


5 


800 


24 


1.8 


7 


4 


15 


12 


Vicky Blazejewski 


6 


1- 9 


11.2 


3- 


6 


500 


5 


8 





2 


6 


1.0 


Pat Dollarton 


7 


2 11 


18.1 


4- 


8 


500 


8 


1.2 


4 


3 


7 


1.0 


Sharon Chapman 


4 


2- 3 


666 


0- 


1 


000 


4 


1.0 


1 





2 


5 



January 10 vs. Wilkes: The Lady 
Colonels took command of the show 
and dropped DVC to below .500 at (4-5) 
with a convincing 80-68 win here at 
DVC. DVC got output from Tammy Pe- 
traskie with a team high 15 and Darcel 
Estep poured in 10. Wilkes was directed 
by Wolfe with 21 and the sisters Kennedy, 
Maureen and Melissa, with 15 and 14 
respectively. 

January 13 vs. Cabrlni: The Lady 
Cavaliers settled in. DVC was prepared 
for the showdown. There was a weapon, 
a temporarily concealed weapon in 
Cabrini's belt and Pento and the gang 
knew all about it. Frieda Gibbs, the 
howitzer that put a load of shrapnel into 
the DVC troops a year ago scoring 47 
points, was back for another go at it. 
DVC went in at halftime sporting a two- 
point 37-35 lead with Petraskie's 1 1 and 
eight eac h from Shirk and Fifi being out- 
standing. Gibbs was held to 12 by a stiff 
"D." Cabrini came back behind 17 sec- 
ond half points by Gibbs to give her a 
game and team high 29 in Cabrini's 
65-61 come-from-behind squeaker 
dropping DVC to 4-6. DVC was led by 
Shirk with 22 and Petraskie with 15. To 
illustrate how dominating a scorer Freida 
Gibbs is, the next highest scorer for 
Cabrini, Jodie Snow, had eight. 

January 17 vs. Allentown: At DVC, 
the Lady Centaurs capitalized on 28 
DVC turnovers and rolled to a 62-43 vic- 
tory. DVC was dropped to 4-7, 2-1 after 
quite a shoddy performance against the 
10-3 Lady Centaurs from Allentown. 
DVC, despite the turnovers, stayed close 
at the half trailing by just three at 28-25. 
But the Centaurs made a myth of DVC 
in the second half outscoring the Aggies 
34-20 enroute to the win. DVC was led 
by Petraskie with 10 and Fifi with eight 
while Allentown was led by Tina Costello, 
a St. Hubert's alumnus from Philadel- 
phia, with 14. 

January 20 vs. Kings: The slump 
continued vs. a talented Kings College 
club but the young DVC team hung in 
there all the way as, down by only five at 
the half at 40-35, DVC stormed back to 
cut the lead but fell just short in the end, 
68-62. DVC (4-8, 2-2) were led by Fifi, 
who had a marvelous showing, with 31 
and Lebanon resident Michele Shirk had 
1 1. On top of the scoring for Kings was 



Patty Thomas with 19, Rhonda Hudzik 
with 18 and Maureen Fahey with 13. 
January 24 vs. Lebanon Valley: 

Lebanon Valley, behind the scoring of 
Penny Hamilton (22), Lisa Biehl (13) 
and Ann Cessna (11) handed the DVC 
ladies their ninth loss of the season with a 
close 65-63 squeaker. DVC hung tough 
with a quality Flying Dutchman team and 
received high-quality output from Shirk 
(17), Fifi (14) and Rotz and Petraskie 
each had eight. 

January 27 vs. Elizabeth; The slump 
is broken. The cat is left out of the box. 
Time to wake up and smell the coffee. 
What?? DVC led the entire way, 30-27 
at the half and conquered St. Elizabeth 
67-65. Taking points to the bank for 
DVC were Shirk (21), Rotz (15) and Etta 
(10). Leading the way for the losers were 
Terry Lockwood with 22 and Angie 
Johnson with 15. 

January 29 vs. Wldener: DVC rolled 
into Pioneer territory to face Widener 
and rolled out with their 10th loss of the 
season falling to the craftiness of the 
Lady Pioneers 65-57. DVC (5-10, 2-3) 
were led by Petraskie with 21 and Shirk 
added 18 while Widener got 17 from 
Lisa Jones and 14 from Heidi Klees. 

January 31 vs. FDU: The Lady Ag- 
gies had a devil of a time against an FDU 
team of the same name but fell in the 
"Big Red Man's (or Woman's) Hands" as 
DVC, tied at the half at 31, lost a nail 
biter 79-74 behind the scoring of Wendy 
Waters (21), Daria Klacht (15) and M.C. 
Boyle (11) while the Lady Aggies were 
led by Fifi with 21, St. Hubert's of Phila- 
delphia alumnus Laura Rotz with 17, 
Tammy with 16 and Michele Shirk with 
15 dropping DVC to 5-11, 2-4. 

February 2 vs. Spring Garden: The 
Lady Bobcats were on the prowl this 
night as Kim Ingham poured in 31 and 
Ann Wright had 30 on their way to 
89-77 victory. DVC was down big at the 
half 47-32 and were down by as many as 
26 in the second half but clawed back in- 
to it only to come up short 89-77 against 
the nationally ranked Lady Bobcats. 
DVC was brought back into the game by 
leading scorer Darcel Estep who finished 
with 18, and Michele Shirk and Tammy 
Petraskie each contributed 13. This puts 
DVC at 5-12 and raises Spring Garden's 
record to 15-3. 




Long hits lay in during DVC's opening day victory. 



TOTALS 



13 



371-818 453 122-192 63 5 864 66 4 201 180 411 31.6 



• • CAREER DAY • • 
FEBRUARY 18, 1987 

(See next issue for details.) 




Athlete of the Week: 

This week's Athlete of the Week has 
done so much for the success of the 
women's basketball team. She's the 
leader in three statistical categories 
(points, average and assists) for Coach 
Pento's squad. She plays the point guard 
position so she is the "quarterback" of 
the team, yelling out each play as the 
team comes down court. She rebounds, 
runs the floor and can shoot the "J" with 
the best of them. This week's athlete 
spotlight is on Darcel Estep, popularly 
known as "Fifi." Fifi, a senior business 
major here at DVC. is a resident of 
Washington, DC. and an alumni of An- 
napolis High School. Seeing how hard 
she works and the leadership qualities 
she possesses, I think it would be a 
shame to see her leave without her see- 
ing a winning season. Congratulations 
Fifi, you are the Athlete of the Week. 




Air Jordan of the Chicago Bulls 



3 



Why work for 

minimum wage 

when you could 

earn $8.00/hour? 

Work part time as a PACKAGE 
HANDLER for United Parcel 
Service in Willow Grove, PA. 
Choose your starting time: 
1 PM, 5PM, 11 PM or 4 AM. 

We also have part time open- 
ings for car washers and cler- 
ical personnel. 

Applications are being ac- 
cepted Monday through Fri- 
day, 9 AM to 4 PM at the PA 
State Job Service Office, 471 
E. County Line Rd., Hatboro, 
PA, or call for information, 
443-2835. Equal Opportunity 
Employer, M/F. 





Tennis at DVC could produce stars like this guy 

TENNIS AT DVC 

■ . ■ ■ ■ . 

Yes, a spring tennis team is being 
organized here at DVC. If anyone is in- 
terested in playing spring tennis, please 
contact Jerry Fritz, Box *1133. 



• ALERT • 

February 18, 1987 
IS CAREER DAY 

Additional Information 
Next Issue! 



Are you denying 

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at grad school? 

Okay, it may be too lale to 
get a 40 But it's not too late to 
try to do better on you r LSAT. 
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theres Stanley H Kaplan 

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collegiate crossword 

"v 




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ACROSS 

1 Grouches 

6 Forceful gush 

11 Antelope leather 

13 Water travelers 

15 Regret 

16 Large global region 

17 Poisonous snake 

18 Former French 
kingdom 

20 The Offensive 

21 "A is Born" 

23 Endures 

24 Neat 

25 "Love Story" author 

27 Permit 

28 Relish 

29 Shrinks back 

31 Physician of old, 
and family 

32 Franklin's toy 

33 Rabbit 

34 Poe's bird (pi.) 
37 Tiresome teachers 

40 Encourages 

41 Trigonometric ratio 
(abbr.) 

42 Prized music maker, 
for short 



44 Large vehicles 

45 Tape recorder 
button 

47 Storage structure 

48 High in pitch 

49 More regretful 

51 Tenth wedding 
anniversary 

52 Food expert 
54 Food 

56 On the way (2 wds.) 

57 Agents of retri- 
bution 

58 Vane directions 

59 Torn places 

DOWN 

1 President Arthur 

2 Wild outbreak 

3 I love: Lat. 

4 " Free" 

5 Firm fiber 

6 Becomes spoiled 

7 Shave off 

8 Actress Hagen 

9 Uneasy 

10 Tested for size 
(2 wds.) 

11 Stupid 



12 Place ir. Rossini 
opera 

13 Le Havre hat 

14 Wood'ar.d deities 
19 Class of verte- 
brates 

22 Illegal businesses 
24 Astai'e and Crosby, 

e.g. 
26 Cut of meat 
28 FOR's mother, 

et al. 

30 Part o* TGIF 

31 Israeli tribe 

33 Mercenary of '76 

34 Destroy 

35 Marine mollusk 

36 California city 

37 Rain 

38 Most hackneyed 

39 Salty medicines 
41 A la 

43 Prohibitions 

45 Auden and Donne 

46 Type of fisherman 

49 Indecent language 

50 Hoarfrost 

53 Cornish prefix in 

names 
55 Checker pieces 



Anybody Want to Show a Dairy Animal for A-Day? 

You don't have to be a Dairy major or a member of the 

Dairy Society to show! But Hurry . . . Animals are 

assigned on a first come — first serve basis. 

Just Sign Up at the DVC Dairy by April 1. 



ORDER YOUR SEATS NOW!! ?Z*STZ 

48 Top Pros • Singles & Doubles i $465,000 Prize Money 1 987 

Tournament Champions 
1962-1986 



1982 Jon Douglas 

1963 Whitney Reed 

1964 Chuck Mcr.nley 

1965 CharlesPa-arell 

1966 Charles Pasaretl 

1967 Arthur Ashe 
1966 Manuel Santana 

1969 Rod Law 

1970 RodLaver 

1971 John Newcombe 

1972 Rod Law 

1973 Stan Smith 



1974 RodLaver 

1975 Marty Riessen 

1976 Jimmy Connors 

1977 Dick Stockton 
197B Jimmy Connors 

1979 Jimmy Connors 

1980 Jimmy Connors 

1981 Roscoe Tanner 

1982 John McEnroe 

1983 John McEnroe 

1984 John McEnroe 

1985 John McEnroe 

1986 ivanLendl 




TICKET PP.ICFS SJOOO S17 SO Si 5 00. 

• OoM Patron Saan • »225 |S25 Mm MducMMI 

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FLEAM Sf NO ME TICKETS AS FOLLOWS 



OTY 



TOTAL 



Box Seat Information 



QeW Patron Sox Seats • 8225 par aaat 

($25 tax deductible) available tor the seven day, 
eight day, eight session senas ONLY 
Sections E. f, Q, H, I. R, S, T. U. V. Row* 1-21. 
Note: Anyone who wishes to be seated in the first 
live rows (temporary seats) for the second 
tour aaaaiona, will be seated in accord with 
their selec t ion tor the first four laaaions m 
•) First eight rowa 0, J, O. W 
b) First hve rowa C. K, P X 
Stiver Patron Box Sexets « 8200 par teat 
Available for the Sevan day, eight session 
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Sections D.J.Q.W, Rows 8-21 

Qotd Patron Seat Holders Bonual Receive an 
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opening of "Tennie-in- Art XVI " 

include* wee* long membership af Ovsrions, the 
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A kmrted number of a a ja j jejej packagee are Seat) 
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Spectrum 



Februa ry 2-8, 
1987 

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available w $225 par seat 
($25 tax deductible) 

i E. F. G. M, I. R. 
S, T, U. V 
1-21 for 8 I 
i ONLY 



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Tun Fab % 10 AM Mdngnt a 

Wad fab 4 lOAM MMragm a 

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NAME 

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CITY . 

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For information csll 215-947-2530 



m€B£L US. PRO INDOOR 





IM!aNRW02«^Mkssf ©Blllks®® 



Vol. XXI, No. 17 

Friday, February 13, 1987 




NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 




Happy 

Valentine's 

Day! 



5TH ANNUAL CAREER DAY 



• WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18 • 
11 A.M. to 4 P.M. in the Student Center 

Full time summer employment for 
Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors 

Internships (summer & fall) for 
Sophomores, Juniors 

Full time positions for 
Seniors 

EVERYONE IS WELCOME! 

Dress to Impress • Seniors bring your resumes! 



These companies are ready and waiting 

for your interviews: 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL 
CAREER PLANNING CLINIC 

The Biology Department will sponsor 
a Pre-professional Career Planning Clinic 
on Wednesday, February 18 beginning 
at 7 p.m. 

The clinic is intended for high school 
students who are interested in pursuing a 
professional career, and their parents. 
The program will present an overview of 
various professions, their special require- 
ments and qualifications, and ways to fi- 
nance both graduate and undergraduate 
education. 

The moderator of the program will be 
Dr. James Miller, Chairman of the Biolo- 
gy Department at DVC. The panel of 
speakers will include: Ed Chroscinski 
'84, a third year student at the University 
of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary 
Medicine; Wendy Wood '83, a fourth 
year student at the Pennsylvania College 
of Podiatric Medicine; Annette Zamboni 
'85, a second year student at the Penn- 
sylvania College of Optometry; Paul 
Hierholzer '84, a first year student at the 
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic 
Medicine; and Joseph Kipp 78, a family 
practice physician. 

This informative program will be help- 
ful to students planning careers in: medi- 
cine, veterinary medicine, chiropractic, 
dentistry, podiatry, optometry, medical 
technology, physical therapy, occupa- 
tional therapy, 'nursing, dental hygiene 
and sports medicine. 

There is no charge for participation in 
the clinic but reservations are required. 
To reserve a place in the clinic, call the 
Biology Department at 345-1500. 



Horticulture Department 

Announces "Professor 

For A Day Program" 

Dr. Neil Vincent, Horticulture Depart- 
ment Chairman, announced today the 
establishment of "The Professor For A 
Day Program." This is a volunteer pro- 
gram using our many outstanding alumni 
to enhance our educational program 
with practical experience gained in the 
outside world. These enthusiastic gradu- 
ates would spend a day with us or we 
would visit them as professors in regular 
courses and perhaps in new career or 
industry-related courses in the future. 
Some program benefits according to Dr. 
Vincent are as follows: 

1. A source of expertise and current 
knowledge in addition to that given by 
our regular professors. 

2. An improvement of course material 
for both the instructor and the students. 

3. Role models for the students to emu- 
late to increase our number of out- 
standing graduates. 

4. Publicity from the appearance of im- 
portant industry figures on campus. 
Some advantages to alumni include 

these: 

1. Personal satisfaction in helping their 
college. 

2. An honorary professor of the day 
degree. 

Program Director Dave Blumenfield 
'50 has signed up Bob Kolmus 78 of 
Peace Valley Winery as our first profes- 
sor of the day. Prof Bob will demonstrate 
to Doc B's Hort Tech Lab class subjective 
and objective methods of wine testing. 
The class will then follow up with "hands 
on" and "mouths on" training. 

The Alumni Office will assist with this 
new program. 



1. Agway, Inc. 

2. Agway Petroleum Division 

3. American Home Food Products, Inc. 

4. Argus Research Labs, Inc. 

5. American Breeders Service 

6. American Tree Care, Inc. 

7. Asgrow Seed Co. 

8. Atlantic Breeders Co-op 

9. Ayerst Laboratories Research, Inc. 

10. Barton's West End Farms, Inc. 

11. Brickman Industries 

12. Bucks County Extension Service 

13. Buckshire Feeds, Ltd. 

14. Bach man Snacks 

15. American Production & Inventory Control 
Society (APICS) 

16. Chemlawn Services Corporation 

17. Control Environmental Services, Inc. 

18. Ciba-Geigy Corp. 

19. Conard-Pyle Co. 

20. Chaple Valley Landscape Co. 

21. Connaught Laboratories, Inc. 

22. Davis Landscape Contractors, Inc. 

23. Farm Bureau 

24. Farm Credit Service-North Central Jersey 

25. Farmers Home Administration 

26. First Investors Corp. 

27. Farmers Home Administration (USDA) 

28. Flower Time, Inc. 

29. Foliage Plant Systems 

30. Friendly Ice Cream Corp. 

31. Gale Nurseries, inc. 

32. Giorgio Foods, Inc. 

33. Green Baron 

34. Hahnemann University 

35. Hazleton Research Products, Inc 

36. Henkle Corp. 

37. Longacre Poultry 

38. Lipinski Landscape & Irrigation Co , Inc. 

39. Merck Sharp & Dohme Research 
Laboratories 

40. Marriott Corp 

41. Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. 

42. Moon/Rickert Nurseries 

43. L.J. Makrancy &. Sons, Inc. 



44. Morris County Park Commission 

45. Na-Churs Plant Food Co. 

46. National College of Chiropractic 

47. Northeast Agri- Employment Services 

48. Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
49 Optech Office Products, Inc. 

50. Peace Corps 

51. Pennfield Corp. 

52. Pepsi-Cola Bottling Group 

53. Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine 

54. Pitman-Moore, Inc 

55. Poley Landscape Co 

56. Princeton Nurseries 

57. Pennsylvania State University 

58. Perdue Inc. 

59. Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc. 

60. Root. Montgomery Landscaping 

61. Parker Interior Landscape 

62. Rohm & Haas Co. 

63. Rolling Greens, Inc. 

64. Rolling Hill Hospital-Medical Technology 
Program 

65. Royer's Flowers, Inc. 

66. Rutgers University, Cook College 

67. Rodale Press, Inc. 

68. Shearon Environmental Design 

69. Sire Power, Inc. 

70. Smith Kline & French Labs. 

71. Southern States Co-op, Inc. 

72. Southeast Farm Credit Service 

73. Terminix International, Inc. 

74. Thomas & Berts Corp. 

75. United Parcel Service 

76. U S Restaurants 

77. United States Air Force 

78. United States Army 

79. United States Army Reserve 

80. United States Marine Corps 

81. Wanner Corp., Landscape & Garden Center 

82. Waterloo Gardens 

83. Wistar Institute 

84. Young's Inc. 

85. The Plllsbury Co. 

86. Mrs. Paul's Kitchens 



COLLEGE TO OFFER 

EQUINE SCIENCE 
ASSOCIATES DEGREE 

What began as a single course in Light 
Horse Production back in 1971 has de- 
veloped into a two-year degree program 
in Equine Science at DVC. 

Beginning in September, students will 
be able to earn as Associates Degree in 
Equine Science. The Pennsylvania De- 
partment of Education granted approval 
of the program in early January. 

Dr. Frederick R. Hofsaess, who taught 
the college's first-ever equine course, 
thinks the new degree program will allow 
students to develop their love for and in- 
terest in horses into a rewarding career. 

"This program fills a need in this geo- 
graphical area," said Hofsaess, who 
manages the college's equine facilities 
and breeding program. "In the past, stu- 
dents who wanted to become involved 
with an equine program would have to 
go to New England or Virginia. Very few 
schools in this area offer this type of pro- 
gram. We have the expertise and facilities 
to provide this service to students." 

According to Hofsaess, DVC's new 
program will emphasize professionalism 

continued on page 4 





JUS 

Wendy L. Unger 

UURDAY, FEBRUARY 14 

Valentine's Day* 

W (A) vs. Western Maryland, 2 p.m. 
MSB W vs. Kings, 8 p.m. 
WH£ W vs. Lycoming, 2 p.m. 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16 * 

Washington's Birthday No ctasesl 

WBB A. ,, .Jp*^ fpm .+ 

i% FEBRUARY 17 j 

Victorian photos free. 11 a.m. -3 p.m. 

, fl>.< Student Center! ^ 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18 

Career Day, 11 a.m. -4 p m., Student 

** thb *eek s artriot * 

IK FEBRUARY 19 

Folowi Monday schedule 

rom Sa0el and Banjo Band at * 

i Pi*, *p.m. 




BEMOTERBYS 



3 PRESENTS E 



RAY BOSTON 

AND HIS SUMMERTIME ANYTIME BEACH PARTY 

featuring 
FREE Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream and Two, Full Size Pools. 



RAY BOSTON 








Ray Boston's 

Chair GolfArea 



Dance Floor 




AHN**** *■* 



"Twister" Game 




Pool Area 



Official Beach Party Locator Map 



Coming . . . Thursday, February 26th 
Ray Boston's Summertime Anytime Beach Party 



Ray Boston is a performer from Kill- 
ington, Vermont who sings from high 
atop an eight-foot lifeguard stand while 
people dance below him on a green 
astroturf dance floor. In addition to sing- 
ing, Ray overseas" the whole party, 
from the two swimming pools, to the 
beach, to the different games. There is a 
special lighting to make everyone look 
tan as well as heat lamps to make every- 
one "feel" tan. 

There are a variety of things a person 
can do at the beach party: dance, listen 
to the music of Ray Boston and a DJ, 
swim, lay on the beach, play Twister, 



volleyball, golf, eat hot dogs, pretzels 
and drink soda (which will be sold at a 
concession stand), or just sit back and 
take in the atmosphere. 

T-shirt and ice cream giveaways, 
dance contest, Twister games, golf game 
and pool games will all take place 
throughout the event. 

The party starts at 8 p.m. so plan on 
getting there early! Admission is free, as 
is the Ben and Jerry's ice cream! This is 
the one Beach Party you won't want to 
miss! Don't forget your sunglasses and 
bathing suit! . 




THE GREEN SCENE 
ATDVC 



and polos (reorders) will also be collected 
at this time. 

Open House 

This past weekend the Admissions Of- 
fice held another Open House in the 
APR. For your information nearly 25 
students with their parents met with Dr. 
Martin and tour guides in the Green- 
house Complex. Dr. Martin spoke about 
the OH. department and how the OH. 
field is currently the spotlight for many 
exceptional career opportunities. The 
students and parents then received tours 
of the Greenhouse Complex and then 
were given smaller tours of the campus 
by tour guides. 



by Jerry Fritz 

Landscape-Nursery Club 

The Landscape-Nursery Club is spon- 
soring a lecture/slide show on "The 
Landscape Industry" given by Mr. Dan 
Tamminga from Davis Landscape Inc., 
Gaithersburg, MD. The show will be 
presented Tuesday, February 17th at 6 
p.m. in the Coffeehouse. 

After the show, the club will have a 
general meeting. Pictures will be taken 
for the yearbook — so all members 
please attend. Money for club t-shirts 




QUOTE OF THE WEEK 

Fact of Life: These days it's safe to 
throw out any piece of mail that looks 
like a check. 

Overheard: "I have a biblical outlook on 

life: I'm going to raise Cain as long as I'm 

Abel." 

Reprinted from Modem Maturity, Feb. -March 1987 



Sophomore 
Dinner Dance 

The sophomore class will be having 
their dinner dance on Friday, February 
20, from 7 p.m. until midnight. The 
dance will feature Ron Faisano as the DJ 
for an exciting night in the "Chalfont 
Room" at Shawnee-at-Highpoint. 

The buffet dinner will begin at 8 p.m. 
and will include: 

Carved Roast Top Sirloin of Beef 

Honey- Dipped Chicken 

Baked Lasagna 

Fried Mini Shrimp 

Noodles Alfredo 

Buttered Com 

Chocolate Mousse Chantilly 

Cash Bar — need I.D. 
Tickets will be on sale until Friday, 
February 13. All those who have pur- 
chased tickets, have a nice night and en- 
joy the dinner and dancing. 

See you there, 
'89 Class Officers 

APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE 
FOR PRE MED PROGRAM 

Doylestown Hospital is accepting ap- 
plications for the summer Volunteer Pre- 
Med Program. 

The 10-week program is open to col- 
lege sophomores and juniors who are 
following a curriculum for medical school 
entrance. 

Participants volunteer 100 hours as 
aides on nursing floors and in the Emer- 
gency Department. Physician-led semi- 
nars and lectures are also part of the 
program. 

The Pre-Med Program begins in May 
and ends in mid- August. Enrollment is 
limited and first consideration will be 
given to students residing in the Central 
Bucks County area. 

Deadline for application is February 
27, 1987. 

For more information, or to request an 
application, contact Volunteer Services, 
Doylestown Hospital, 595 W. State St.. 
Doylestown, PA 18901, or call (215) 
345-2204. 



Billboard's 
Top Ten Pop Singles 

WEEK ENDING 2/7/87 

1. "Livin' on a Prayer," Bon Jovi 

2. "Open Your Heart," Madonna 

3. "Change of Heart," Cyndi Lauper 

4. "Touch Me," Samantha Fox 

5. "Keep Your Hands to Yourself," 
Georgia Satellites 

6. "Will You Still Love Me?", Chicago 

7. "At This Moment," Billy Vera & 
the Beaters 

8. "Jacob's Ladder," Huey Lewis & 
the News 

9. "We're Ready," Boston 

10. "Ballerina Girl," Lionel Richie 

WEEK ENDING 2/19/77 

1. "Blinded by the Light," Manfred 
Mann's Earth Band 

2. "New Kid in Town," Eagles 

3. "Torn Between Two Lovers," Mary 
MacGregor 

4. Love Theme From A Star is Born, 
"Evergreen," Barbra Streisand 

5. "I Like Dreamin'," Kenny Nolan 

WEEK ENDING 2/18/67 

1. "Kind of a Drag," Buckinghams 

2. "I'm a Believer." Monkees 

3. "Ruby Tuesday," Rolling Stones 

4. "Georgie Girl," Seekers 

5. "(We Ain't Got) Nothin' Yet," 
Blues Magoos 




REMEMBER: 

Thursday, February 19 

Follow a 
Monday schedule! 



Empty Space Plagues Your Newspaper! 



Ram Pages seems to be existing only 
through the enthusiasm of a productive 
Sports Wrap-up Editor, Advertising 
Editor and the various sources of news 
releases that fill the official P.O. Box 
*988 every week. The result is a student 
newspaper— the paper which represents 
the events and written opinions of stu- 
dents at DVC— which has become a col- 
lection of one to five true news articles, 
up to four pages of extensive sports cov- 
erage and a good amount of advertising. 
We are proud of the quality of that which 
we print; but is it a balanced representa- 
tion of this college? Does anyone care? 

The editors of Ram Pages welcome 
your written criticism of our coverage of 
the events at DVC. We only hope that 
you consider first that we are the product 
of the work of only three to four people 
at the moment; there is no larger news- 
paper staff in sight, either. Otherwise, 
you can respond as you wish— Ram 
Pages has always been willing to print a 
reader's response as long as it is truthful, 
fair and signed by the writer (s). 

You know, if you can write such a let- 
ter, you are on your way to becoming a 
potential Ram Pages staff member. The 
three of us are positive proof that DVC 
students can both successfully carry 18 
credits per semester (o.k., maybe 12 to 
16 average) and write, report for and 
edit Ram Pages weekly. We wouldn't 
mind telling you that earning an extra 
0.5 credit per semester is like a carrot 
dangling in front of Bugs Bunny! We 
can't be the only students willing to earn 
an extra half-credit for extra-curricular 
activity; we certainly are not the best 



writers on campus, either! DVC has got 
to have more than three or four people 
on campus who have an inclination to 
work for a newspaper— even Ram Pages 
is a start. At least it can "look good on 
your resume." 

Do we sound desperate? At this point 
it may be hard to conceal our desire to 
represent our school in the best way pos- 
sible. We are not a heavily structured, 
bureaucratic machine; your ideas are 
always welcome and we try to act on all 
new suggestions. First, though, we need 
the necessary staff to act on your sugges- 
tions. Three editors does not a student 
newspaper make! 

If you have thought about joining the 
Ram Pages staff, you may have won- 
dered about what it can offer you in re- 
turn for your time and energy. Benefits 
include: 

• 0.5 credits per semester you are a 
member 

• your name in print, or anonymous if 
desired 

• upward mobility; from reporter to edi- 
tor in one easy step if you show ability 
and responsibility 

• available pizza at Mon. night meetings 

• the feeling of accomplishment from 
creating a newspaper every week 
The positions we offer are numerous 

— we have no staff photographer, we 
need reporters, writers, even proofread- 
ers. We meet just one night per week — 
Mondays at 7 p.m. unless otherwise 
posted. 
We hope to see or hear from you soon . 

Bill Rein 

Co-Editor-in-Chief 



9 VALENTINE LINES '87 <Q 



D. - Happy Valentine's Day. - Love ya. K. 

JoAnna — You're a real sweetheart 1 Thank* for 
bearing with me. / hope our last couple months 
together will be ones we can enjoy and always 
remember. Love you! — John 

Trlsh - Hep* four Valentines Day Is great. 
Your a special friend. - Manjaret 

Ed — Hey thanks for donuts on the bridge, records 
In the mall, hot dogs at 7-11, buffalo wings, walks 
with the ducks, dancing at Caesar's and I'm really 
sorry about what I did to your stereo. 

km, - Mlcro~opk dice, you re young, youTI 
adjust. Oh baby its a wild world if s hard to 
gat by Just upon a smile, hot us Sag I 



Denny — Thanks for being a friend. And by the 
way you get 3's. 

Toolman - Thanks for fixing the radio and 
dancing up a storm with met 

P.J. - Test? What test? McDonald's . . . Beam me 
up Scotty! "I mean, did you think I'd hang myself 
for Utterln?" We're not really going to class are we? 
Kill Kill Kill Happy Valentine's Day! 

Do n na - McDonald's msasscrs, I wants be 
sedated, Caesar's, destined to be dairy! Happy 
Valentine's Day! 

To Bill and Billy - Happy Valentine's Day to two 
special guys. You two are BOTH hot, sexy, exert 
ing, strong, big and wanted! Ill take you up on your 
offer! All three of us! AH at the same time! Ooooh 
yup! One question: WHEN?!?!? — Love always, 
"PAY BACK" 

Trlaha — Thanks for being a number one 
roommate and showing me such a good time 
my first year. I love you lots and will always 
srteh the beat for you. Someday well get 
lucky like ArrJ Seymoref - Love you always . 
Us 

Super Seven — There's not much of us left any- 
more, but I love you off anyway . — Norton — P.S. 
Here's one for Riddler, Goo-Goo Ca Choo 



To Maggie Ewan - You've already got a 
Valentine, to I wont aak . I Jest want to say 
that I love you, something that should be 
said more often, not hist on Valentine's Day. 

- Love, Us 

Tracy - I'm glad you finally found a Valentine. It's 
our (Me & Wifbert's) turn now. Take it slow. I love 
you and thank you for a friendship I've never had 
before. — Love, Lis 

Super 7 - Happy Valentine's Day. Thanks 
for being yourselves. You are the BEST! Even 
though we are missing two friends In person, 
they are with ws In spirit. God bless. 

B&S — Do I know you!? Happy Valentine's Day 

- Love, Peegte 

Jul - Yes. we sre Destined to be Dairy!" 

To the Tabor guys — Happy Valentine's Day from 
the gins at the standard place!!! 

Froot Loop Troop - Happy Valentine's Day 
girls! You are the women!! - Love, Art 

Eric — You are such a doff. Thanks for being such a 
great friend. I love ya! Happy Valentine's Day! — 
Love, Donna 

Janet - I purchased these lines for Valen- 
tine's but at this tune I can't make up my 
mini so won't you please be my Valentine? 

- Mike 

MB. — Roses are red, violets are blue, I love you 
most when I'm doing it with you. - S.H. 

To the Super Seven — Thanks for being such 
great friends. You guys have made this year 
SOOO much fun. Happy Valentine's Day. - 
Love, Art 

To Vicky R. — 1 like you, I love you, I want you to 
be mine; so please tell me that youll be my Valen- 
tine. — From, (sigh . . .) 

John - I'm glad to aee things sre starting to 
fall In place for us and I'm glad I found out 
what you think. Happy Valentine's Day. - 
Love ya. Tracy 



SP 



Who's Who in the Ornamental 
Horticulture Department 



9 



Mr. David Benner is the O.H. faculty 
member of the week. Mr. Benner was 
educated at Penn State University and 
received his degree in horticulture. From 
1956 to 1966 Mr. Benner was the direc- 
tor of Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve 
in New Hope, PA. In the fall of 1967 he 
came to DVC. This fall will mark 20 
years of his dedication to the O.H. de- 
partment. Mr. Benner has been very ac- 
tive both on campus and off. For exam- 
ple, some community organizations that 
he is affiliated with are the Del-AWARE, 
Bucks County Audubon Association and 
the Bucks County Conservancy. Mr. 
Benner also completed a one year 
survey of all the flora of New Jersey's 
state parks and forests. 

Mr. Benner enjoys many hobbies such 
as skiing, fishing, cooking, playing tennis 
and especially gardening. He has devel- 
oped a very unique private garden at his 
home. The garden stresses low mainte- 
nance and shade-loving plants. Another 
unique feature to his garden is that he 
has a moss lawn instead of grass. This at- 
tracts over 350 visitors each spring and it 
also receives a great deal of attention in 
many horticultural publications. 

The next time you see a man running 
around campus pruning trees, you can 
bet it is Mr. Benner. 






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STAFF 

EditorsinChief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Reporters Mike Bolles, Melanie 

O'Neill, Annmarie Whrtesell 

Advisors Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemet 



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Lit — Thanks for being there, good and bod! Hope 
your Valentine's Day is great. — Love, Tracy 

Margaret - Thank yon for ever ything you've 
done. Happy Valentine's Day. - Love, Tracy 

Trlsh — I know we've had some ups and downs, 
but we always put through. Thanks for listening. 
Happy Valentine's Day. — Love, Tracy 

Mr. Decker - Happy Valentine's Day. Don't 
forget aome candy and a card for Mrs Decker. 
- Me 

Maggie, Terry, Ed, Kathy and Bob - Happy 
Vdentfne's Day. - Mary C. 

Jamie - Roaea are red, violets are blue, I 
sure need a friend, and It's you. - MCB 

Bobby L. — Roses are red, violets are blue, Bobby 
L. going in the Army, what will security do? — New 
Yorker 

Housekeeping - Roaea are red, violets are 
blue. Ho u sekee p ing people, I sure do like 

working with you. 

Dear Steven — Roses are red, Penn State is blue, 
think about me, and HI think about you! Have a 
great time. - Love, Trouble 

Steve M. - Happy Valentine's Day to the 
sweetest guy on campus, and my beat friend. 
I love you! - Lisa B. 

Dear Twin Brother — You will never know the feel- 
ings that I have for you. I would NEVER hurt some- 
one whom I care so deeply for. You are the best 
thing that has happened to me in a while. I NEED 
YOU!!! Happy Valentine's Day! 

STANLEY - To a Valentine he deserves, and 
has! Glad all la going well. Thank you for be- 
ing auch a great friend to me. You hold a spe- 
cial place In my heart. Happy Valentine's 
Day! I love you! - WILBERT 

Scott 



Dvc youi — wiLDcn i 

ocoa — Would you be my Valentine? — Donna 

Tracy - Just keep remembering If It doesn't 
work out. There's always more p In 

the aee. Happy Valentine's Day. - Margaret 



• ALERT * 

February 18, 1987 
IS CAREER DAY 



PLACEMENT OFFICE 

INDIVIDUAL INTERVIEWS 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19 

(Mondays schedule) 

AGWAY INC. 

Management Trainee 
AGWAY INC. PETROLEUM DIV. 

Management Trainee 
CHEMLAWN SERVICES CORP. 

Route Manager 
FLOWER TIME INC. 

Management Trainee 

Growers 

Horticultural/Consultant 
PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING GROUP 

Management Trainee in Sales and 

Manufacturing 
PERDUE INC. 

Plant Management Trainee 

Marketing Representative 

Poultry Service Supervisor 
SIRE POWER INC. 

Artificial Insemination Sales & Service 
THE PILLSBURY CO. 

Sales Representative 



Answer to last week's puzzle. 




My Dearest Sam — Remember always, I love you! 
-PJ 

Seymour - Happy Valentine's Day! Hope all 
goea well with you and your new man! You 
da e ar v e hi Never change, Just be yourself. I 
love you like that! 

Hey Roomie — Here's to changing our major 
senior year. — PJ 

Julie - Here's to junior year. Happy Valen- 
tine's Day. - Love, PJ 

Kimie — Happy Valentine's and remember "We're 
young ..." — Love, PJ 

Donut - Happy Valentine's Day! K? - Love, 
PJ 

Ed — I mean, I mean, Happy Valentine's Day. — 
PJ 

Liz - Evan though they're not knocking 
down the door, I've seen them gaping. Happy 
Valentine's Day. - Margaret 

NORTON — I want to thank you for everything. 
Everything that you have done for me, given me, 
said to me and shared with me. You are special to 
me. I LOVE YOU! 

Kevin - These peat few months have been 
the greatest, all because you have been In my 
life. I want you to know how much I care 
about you and how much you mean to me. 
Thank you for everything and Happy Valen- 
tine's Day! — Love, Donna 

ART — You akeady have a Valentine for today! 
But then again, you have one everyday! Thanks for 
being who you are. I LOVE YOU! - Wilbert 

Dad — Thank you for putting up with the 
things 1 do and being there to hear my prob- 
lems. Hnppy Valentine's Day, Dad! - Love 
always, Tracy 

Dear Boo Boo — I know you love me as much as 1 
love you, that's why I'm sending this little memo to 
you Would you be my Valentine? — Love, Holly 




Quiz Yourself 
on Current Events . . . 

1 . Governor Robert P. Casey intervened 
to deal with what crisis in Philadelphia? 

2. What new rules in U.S. government 
buildings affect hundreds of thousands 
of people? 

3. President Reagan suffered his first 
major legislative defeat of the year as 
Congress overwhelmingly overrode a 
veto of what legislation? 

4. Why were investigators of the Amtrak- 
Conrail train accident searching a 
river near Baltimore? 

5. One of the most high-profile and 
combative officials to work in the 
White House in recent years resigned. 
Who is he? 

6. William J. Casey resigned as director 
of the CIA. Name President Reagan's 
choice for his successor. 

7. What country has approved an all- 
new Constitution and by what margin? 

Source: The Philadelphia Inquirer. Feb. 8, 1987 

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collegiate camouflage 



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Can you find the hidden aviation terms ? 



ALTIMETER 

BALLOON 

BANKING 

BIPLANE 

BLIMP 

BOMBER 

CANOPY 



CHASSIS 

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GONDOLA 

G-SUIT 

HEAVIER-THAN-AIR 

HELICOPTER 

HYDROPLANE 



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PROPELLER 

RUNWAY 

SPAN 

STALL 

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TRIM 

TURBOJET 

VECTOR 

YAW 

ZOOMING 



Equine, continued from page 1 

and training while producing a well- 
rounded horseperson educated in all 
aspects of equine science. 

"Career possibilities," said Hofsaess, 
"include riding instructor, facilities (riding 
or training) manager, groom, veterinary 
assistant, foaling manager and sales of 
equine-related materials. 

"The entire industry is growing," said 
Hofsaess. "The horse is a recreational 
animal. As people look for more inter- 
esting leisure activities to get involved 
with interest in horses tends to increase 
tremendously." 

Among the broad areas covered in the 
two-year degree program will be driving, 
training, riding, breeding and business 
management. All courses will be taught 
with the same philosophy of practical, 
hands-on experience which has been 
proven so successful at DVC since 18%. 

"DVC is one of only three colleges or 
universities in the country which main- 
tains a herd of standardbreds," said Hof- 
saess. "The advantage," he explained, 
"is that students are able to be trained in 
breeding techniques which are not avail- 
able' with other types of horses." 

The horsemanship and training courses 
in the program will be conducted at 
Wildemere Farm, which is located ap- 
proximately six miles from campus. This 
dressage and training facility features a 
16-box stable, 20-by-40- meter indoor 
arena and large turnout areas. 

The horses used in the horsemanship 
and training courses are selected based 
on their training, temperament and suit- 
ability to purpose. A number of "green" 
riding and driving horses are maintained 
for use in the training courses, as well as 



advanced horses with successful show 
records. 

The college is an active member of the 
Intercollegiate Horse Show Association 
(IHSA), Region V. Hunt Seat (English) 
and Stock Seat (Western) horse shows 
are hosted by various colleges and uni- 
versities each semester. DVC's teams 
have shown considerable success over 
the years. The college has been repre- 
sented at Nationals by the Western Team 
in 1985 and by the English Team in 
1986. The current national champion 
"Intermediate on the Flat" is a DVC 
student. 

"The Equine Science program was in 
the planning stages for three years," said 
Hofsaess. The program was approved 
by the college's Animal Husbandry De- 
partment, Curriculum Committee, Presi- 
dent and Academic Dean, and the Edu- 
cation Committee of the Board of Trust- 
ees before it was reveiwed in Harrisburg. 

Hofsaess emphasized that students 
enrolled in the two-year program will be 
treated the same as those enrolled in any 
of the college's four-year programs. 
Housing, meals and social activities will 
be available to everyone on an equal 
basis. 

After completing the two-year pro- 
gram, students will have the option to 
study and work overseas. Agreements 
have been reached in the United King- 
dom, Germany and Switzerland to allow 
students to study 'n those countries for 
up to one year. Students who elect this 
option will have their room and board, 
along with a modest living expense, pro- 
vided. Airfare will be refunded by the 
overseas employer upon successful com- 
pletion of the program. 



Video Games in Pub 
are Muffled! 

Dear Editors, 

We are grateful to the DVC Student 
Government for listening to our request 
which was recently placed in the com- 
muter suggestion box. We asked that the 
video games placed in the Caesar's Pub 
Snack Bar please be removed, due to 
the annoying sounds they tend to emit 
while being played. Within two weeks 
after we formed this request letter, the 
video games were still there, but the 
noises were toned down enough that the 
only time they're noticeable is when you 
see somebody standing there — which is 
fine with us! 

Though we had hoped that the games 
would be permanently moved to the 
Game Room — which seemed like an 
appropriate place and which would have 
removed them from blocking vision to 
the large screen TV — we are glad to see 
that something positive was done in 
reaction to the suggestion we made. 

Thank you again, 
Four Commuters 



WANTED: 
Wrestling Reporter 

The Ram Pages Sports Editor has 
been searching for a reliable reporter 
to follow the DVC wrestling team — a 
team which is quite successful and of 
which we are proud! However, the sea- 
son is already nearing completion. Any- 
one willing to give statistics^and highlights 
of matches — upcoming as well as past 
— please notify John Litzke, Sports 
Editor, via P.O. Box 988. 

Editor's Note: John Litzke, as editor, 
has followed, reported and written about 
as many sports teams as has been physi- 
cally possible. It is about time a few other 
sports fans follow and report those teams 
which he cannot, so that the entire cam- 
pus can appreciate their hard work and 
successes. 



MONEY-FOR-COLLEGE 

by Irving Bender 

Q. Since 1 live at home with my par- 
ents while attending art college, I am not 
eligible for the Pell Grant, etc. My savings 
are just about exhausted. What other 
help is there for me? (R.S., RI) 

A. You are eligible for private source 
awards based on factors in your back- 
ground including field of study, career 
goals, your parents employment and 
veteran's status — and many more. 

Here is a private source award you are 
eligible for based on your field of study: 
ALLIED ARTISTS INC. (Oil/Watercolor 
and Sculpture Exhibition/National Ex- 
hibition), 15 GRAMERCY PARK S., 
NEW YORK, NY 10003. AWARDS: 
$100-$800. DEADLINE: OCT. 5. 45 
AWARDS GIVEN EACH YEAR AT 
THE EXHIBITION. 

How can you know all you are eligible 
for? This is an enormous chore because 
there are so many independent sources. 
You can tap the world's largest compu- 
terized database of private award sources: 
over 200,000 listings covering UNDER- 
GRADUATE, GRADUATE, and OVER- 
SEAS study. For free details, write: Fi- 
nancial Aid Finders, 77 Gristmill Rd., 
Randolph, NJ 07869. 





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!!!!!!!!! IT'S BACK HUM!! 

AEROBICS 

Every Monday & Wednesday 

4:15 to 5:45 P.M. 

IN THE ALL-PURPOSE ROOM 

STARTING FEBRUARY 2 

Get a jump on summer!!! 

Look and feel better! 
Come out and participate! 

ATTENTION: No Aerobics Mon., Feb. 16 (no 
classes) and Wed., Feb. 18 (Career Day). 




SPORTS' BRIEFS '87 

by John Litzke 

• Doc scores 22 in his final All-Star ap- 
pearance with West winning in OT 
154-149 as seven Easterners and six 
Westerners finished in double figures. 
Seattle's Tom Chambers led all scorers 
with 34 and received MVP and Dallas's 
Rolando Blackman finished with 29 for 
the West. The East was led by Moses 
with 27. The day before, Larry Bird 
captured Three-point Shooting Con- 
test and Air Jordan was named King of 
the Dunk. 

• If the recent bench-clearing brawl be- 
tween team Canada and the Soviet's in 
the 1987 World Junior Hockey Cham- 
pionships is any indication of the new 
style of play adopted by the Soviets, 
then the NHL All-Stars (who did battle 
against the Soviet National team on 
Wednesday night and tonight on ESPN 
in rendezvous '87) better be set. 

• NBA Commissioner David Stem seri- 
ously considering having the NBA com- 
pete in International Tournaments. 
Also, expect up to a three team expan- 
sion in the NBA before 1990. 

• Cleveland Indians sign catcher Rick 
Dempsey to one-year contract. 

• Former Olympic champion Mark Bre- 
land captures WBA Welterweight Title 
after knocking out Harold Volbrecht. 
What's amazing is Breland broke his 
hand in the first round and still con- 
tinued the boxing match. 

• Temple remains at number sue in AP 
and UPI as tournament time is just 
around the corner. 

• Tim Mayotte defeats John McEnroe to 
win Ebel Tennis Tournament in Phila- 
delphia, 3-6, 6-1, 6-3, 6-1. 



Bill, Mark, Big Nol and Rock at Scrartton. 

Fans of the Century 

Without them, the outcome of last Wednesday's Scranton matchup may have turned out different Led by 
Brandt Nolan, the DVC faithful made their way up the turnpike and piled into the Scranton Gym like frat 
brothers in a phone booth and made their voices heard, putting the Scranton crowd to shame Thanks a 
million and let's do it more often 1 . 





Air Jordan of the Chicago Bulls 





Athletes of the Week: 

Two of our future stars are in the spot- 
light this week. Both are members of the 
1986-87 men's basketball team and both 
can shoot the lights out of the ball. 

First there's John Jones, a 6-2 fresh- 
man from Cardinal Dougherty H.S. in 
Philadelphia. On January 28, Jones hit 
for a game and season high 31 vs. the 
Greyhounds in DVC's shalacking of 
Moravian. John has outstanding poten- 
tial and should contribute greatly to 
future ball clubs. 

Then we have Dwight Weldon, a 
sophomore out of Wissahickon H.S. in 
Ambler. Dwight hit for a season high of 
31 points vs. Messiah, February 7, in 
DVC's 92-80 win. Dwight is the leading 
scorer on the team averaging 18/game. 
He is a prolific scorer with an outstanding 
touch and unlimited potential. 

With players like Jones and Weldon 
around for the next three years there's 
bound to be many successes and some 
possible playoff berth's in the seasons to 
come. Congratulations John and Dwight, 
you are the Athletes of the Week. 



Spring Track 
Opens Season 

The 1987 season provides exciting 
competition for the men and women of 
DVC. A strong nucleus of experienced 
competitors may make this season one 
of the best for the thin clads. 

The co-captains selected for the 
women's track this season are Connie 
Hajidannou (sprints) and Tina Drey 
(shotput, discus, javelin). The men's co- 
captains include Steve Caffey (sprints 
and jumps) , Jim Flukey (javelin) . David 
Keich (sprints and jumps) and Dave 
Sports (distance). 

Interested students are invited to the 
organizational meeting for spring track 
on Tuesday, February 17, 4:30 p.m. in 
the Coffeehouse. Experience in track 
and field is NOT required, but desire is a 
criterion. 

Head coach Richard Acker and assis- 
tant coach James Garvin return for their 
second season. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home away from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: 12-Horse Ale 
Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: S1 Cheesesteak 

Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

/Area's Best Lunches 11 AM -3 PM 

Hoppy Hour 4 - 6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 




ES 



KAn-2 PR 

Sports Trivia '87 

In 1979, the NCAA Final pitted two 
state colleges. Name the two schools and 
the two NBA superstars who came from 
each school. 

If you know the answer to this week's 
trivia, place your answer, your name, 
and your box number on a slip of paper 
and have it placed into Box 951. If your 
correct entry is chosen, you'll be the win- 
ner of a free coupon for a burger, fries, 
and Pepsi from Caesar's Pub. And re- 
member, you can't win if you don't play. 

WE HAVE A WINNER! 

Congratulations to Kevin Stanton who 
correctly matched the correct college 
with its bird nickname: 

1. E Temple Owls 

2. I Kansas Jay hawks 

3. F South Carolina Gamecocks 

4. J Iowa Hawkeyes 

5. A Louisville Cardinals 

6. L Bowling Green Falcons 

7. B Creighton Blue Jays 

8. M St. Joseph's Hawks 

9. C Long Island Blackbirds 

10. O Canisius Griffins 

11. D Boston College Eagles 

12. N Niagra Purple Eagles 

13. G Oregon Webfoots 

14. K Virginia Tech Gobblers 

15. H St. Peter's Peacocks 







Tennis at DVC could produce stars like this guy. 

TENNIS AT DVC 

Yes, a spring tennis team is being 
organized here at DVC. If anyone is in- 
terested in playing spring tennis, please 
contact Jerry Fritz, Box *1133. 



WRESTLERS ON CHAMPIONSHIP PACE AT 15-2 




Bedesem in 190 lb division is undefeated at 
14-00. 



by Brian Taggart 

DVC wrestling, led by head coach 
Robert Marshall (wrestling coach at DVC 
for 13 years) is into another winning 
season. 

Except for the first two losses, one 
against Brown 25-12 and the other 
against Springfield 25-19, DVC has won 
their last tiine matches. DVC wrestlers 
won against the following schools: NYU 
47-5, Swarthmore 44-5, Delaware State 
48-12, Ursinus 27-16, Lafayette 40-8, 
Kean 46-6, Seton Hall 44-3, Villanova 
48-6 and Lycoming 29-10. 

Leading wrestlers include, returning 
MAC champ and two-time National 
Champ of Division HI, Shaun Smith. 
Smith is currently undefeated 14-0-0 
wrestling at 142 lbs. Another undefeated 
wrestler is Rich Williams who is wrestling 
at 126 lbs. and has a record of 5-0-0. 
Rich is a defending MAC Champ and an 



All- American. Other undefeated wrest- 
lers are Jim Bodai at 134 lbs. with a rec- 
ord of 14-0-0, Randy Worrell at 167 lbs. 
with a record of 4-0-0, Garth Lakitsky at 
177 lbs. at 10-0-1 and Vince Bedesem at 
190 lbs. with a record of 13-0-0. 

Here's a rundown of the 1987 DVC 
wrestling team and their respective 
records: 

118 Mike Zarbatany, 3-5-1 
118 Chris Britton, 3-6-0 
126 Rich Williams, 5-0-0 
134 Jim Bodai, 14-0-0 
142 Shaun Smith, 14-0-0 
150 Tracy Snyder, 9-4-1 
158 Frank Pershpalaj, 3-7-0 
167 Randy Worrell, 4-0-0 
167 Dan Monaghan, 3-5-1 
177 Garth Lakitsky, 10-0-1 
190 Vince Bedesem, 13-0-0 
Hwt Chuck Heiber, 9-4-0 




Tracy Snyder grapples for mat supremacy with 
Nova (not so wild, more like mild) cat. 




Gold 


W 


L 


X 


Double Stuff 


2 





1.000 


Terps 


1 





1.000 


Running Rabbi's 


1 


1 


.500 


Blue Demons 


1 


1 


.500 


Agboh 





1 


.000 


Boffers 





2 


.000 



Wednesday's (2/4) Games 

Running Rebels 52, Gargoyles 44 
EMO vs. Wolf Pack 

Boyle, Leinbach 
Keep Rebels Unbeaten 

The Running Rebels (3-0) remained 
undefeated after their 52-44 win over the 
Gargoyles (1-1) in Work Gym. Powered 
by Paul "Judge" Leinbach's game high 
17 and Bill "Pearl" Boyle's 15, the Run- 
nin' Rebs took a 24-18 halftime lead and 
never looked back. Doug Herring led the 
Gargoyles in scoring and rebounds with 
14 and 12 respectively and Scott Cooper 
added 11 points. Tim Brennan pulled 
down 12 rebounds and Chris Snyder 



Intramural Standings 


nine tor the r 


[unnin 


Kebels. 










Running 






by John Litzke 








Rebels 




Gargoyles 


Green 


w 


L 


% 


Rother 


2 


Hartung 4 


Running Rebels 
Psychotic Hoop 


3 





1.000 


Brennan 


8 


Herring 14 


1 





1.000 


Boyle 


15 


Knight 2 


Gargoyles 


1 


1 


.500 


Leinbach 


17 


Hepner 8 


Bambino Magicians 


1 


1 


.500 


Kennedy 


4 


Bachinsky 


EMO. 


1 


1 


.500 


Snyder 





Cooper 1 1 


Space Between 





1 


.000 


Arnold 


4 


Mucchi 5 


Wolf Pack 





3 


.000 


C. Boyle 


4 






-P 


! 












HE! 











We need help! We would like you to 
help us on Career Day — putting up 
signs on tables, registration, greeters, etc. 

If you are able to give us a hand, we 
would appreciate it very much. Please 
stop to see Mrs. Grazioso and let her 
know if you will be free to help. If you 
have friends who would like to help, 
bring them along. 




Are you denying 

yourself 

abetter shot 

at grad school? 

Okay, it may be loo late to 
get a 40 But it's not too late to 
try to do better on you r LSAT. 
GMAT.t»E.orMCAT »^Mnat. 
there's Stanley H Kaplan. 

No one has prepped more 
students than Stanley H 
Kaplan Our test taking tech- 
niques and educational 
programs have prepared 
over 1 million students 

So whatever grad school 
exam youre taking, call us 
Remember, the person next to 
you during your exam might 
have taken a Kaplan course 

i KAPLAN 

SIANUYH KAHANfDUCAnONAlCBslTaiJD 

DON T COMPETE WITH 
A KAPLAN STUDENT-BE ONE 

1528 Walnut Street, 11th Floor 

Philadelphia, PA 19102 

(215)546-3317 

1329 W. Cheltenham Avenue 

Melrose Park, PA 19126 

(215)635-3116 




TRACK RESULTS 

Results of the meet at Haverford held 
February 6. The colleges participating in- 
cluded: Haverford, Moravian, Muhlen- 
berg, Lebanon Valley, FOM, Swarth- 
more, Widener, Ursinus, St. Joseph's 
and Villanova. 

55 High Hurdles 

* Brinsky 8:41 
Sperry 8:47 
DeLaney 8:51 
Makowski 9:16 

55 Dash 

Caffey 6:80, 6:86 (5th) 

Dickmyer 6:70 

Howard 7:0 

1,000 Run 

Benner 4:07 

400 Run 

Rueb 52:99 

Enoch 53:53 

Allen 57:54 

Kunkle 68:45 

Hajioannou 68:46 

3,000 Run 

Donofrio 10:05 

Thompson 10:50 

Miller 11:21 

1,600 Relay 

(Team *1, 3rd place) 

Rueb 53:5 

Brinsky 56:39 

Enoch 55:89 

Benner 53:93 

(Team *2) 

Howard 59:80 

Makowski 56:77 

Mazur 59:25 
Dickmyer 59:02 

Long Jump 

Caffey 20 '-9" 
Mazur 19'-6" 

Triple Jump 

Caffey 38 '-6* 
Sperry 38 '-4* 
Kunkel32'-5" 

High Jump 

Kunkel5'-2"(lst) 

Allen 5'-6" 

Delaney 5 '-6* 



Philadelphia Wings 
Indoor Lacrosse 

Scanner, the Philadelphia area college 
magazine, is offering students every- 
where a chance to save $2.00 a ticket to 
the Philadelphia Wings Lacrosse game 
on Saturday, February 21. The Wings 
will be playing the Baltimore Thunder. 

Coupons are available in February's 
issue of Scanner. Look for it on your 
campus. 




It takes a second to say goodbye . . . say goodbye . . . 
push the button and pull the plug . say goodbye 



OPEN FORUM ON 
ARMS RACE 

"The Social Cost of the Arms Race" 
will be the topic of an open forum featur- 
ing The Honorable William H. Gray III, 
U.S. Congressman, and Victor W. Sidel, 
M.D., president-elect, Physicians for 
Social Responsibility (PSR), on Friday, 
February 20, at Hahnemann University. 
The forum will take place from 7-9 p.m. 
in Geary Auditorium, first floor, Hahne- 
mann New College Building, 245 N. 
15th St., Philadelphia. 

Rep. Gray is chairman of the House 
Budget Committee. Dr. Sidel is a distin- 
guished university professor of Social 
Medicine, Albert Einstein College of 
Medicine, New York, and immediate 
past president of the American Public 
Health Association. During the forum, 
they will address the impact of military 
spending on the delivery of health care. 

The event, which is free and open to 
the public, is being sponsored by Hahne- 
mann University in conjunction with 
Physicians for Social Responsibility, the 
American Medical Student Association 
(AMSA) and the Student National Medi- 
cal Association (SNMA) . For more infor- 
mation, call (215) 448-8284. 





EMk^m^ Wlflc^ ©slllksss 



Vol. XXI. No. IS 

Friday, February 20. 1987 



News to 
Keep You Warm! 

Things to Do - Page 2 




NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



New ideas: A Permanent 
DVC Roadside Market 

Dear Editors, 

We feel that the college has an oppor- 
tunity that has been overlooked for many 
years. We think that a roadside produce 
market would be a tremendous asset to 
the school. The educational, civic and 
financial benefits would have a major 
positive impact upon the college and the 
community. 

The educational benefits would be 
vast. All majors, from Agronomy to Busi- 
ness to Ornamental Horticulture would 
benefit from such a business. A perma- 
nent structure, in proximity to Route 
202, would be an excellent place for the 
market. 

The fruit that is grown in the orchards 
would be the major items sold, along 
with honey, cider and other products 
that the college produces. The Floral 
Department could sell fresh-cut flowers 
and arrangements. The Dairy Majors/ 
Clubs could sell ice cream and milk. The 
Ornamental Horticulture Majors/Clubs 
could set up designs and offer drawings 
and estimates for people's homes. O.H. 
Landscape would have an excellent op- 
portunity to exhibit their plant material 
for public sale. The Agribusiness and 
Business majors could work on the ac- 
counting and the marketing aspects of 
the business. 

The benefits derived from such a busi- 
ness are innumerable. The community 
could actually see the college in a work- 
ing form. The "hands on" experience 
that all students would gain would be 
tremendous. The students would see the 
growing, distribution and consumption 
of their products. Students would gain a 
better understanding of public relations 
and marketing. 

We feel that the wagons that were 
used in the fall are obsolete. It is our 
opinion that a professional farm market 
would be beneficial to the college, its 
students and the community. 

Sincerely, 
Walter Murphy 
Senior, BA 
Charles E. Baker 
Sophomore, HT 

This Week on 
Campus 

byWL. Ungsr 

* FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 20 * 

So p h omo re Dfciner Dance at 
Hlghpo fc> t , 

* SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 21 * 

MB8 (H) vi. Draw, 2 p.m. 

* MOMMY, FEBRUARY 23 * 

Ram Pages Meeting, 7 p.m., 2nd floor 
Student Canter 

* WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 23 * 

Movie: The KOtng Re**, 9 p.m. In 
toe APR. 

* THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26 * 

Ray Beaton's Beach Forty, 9 p.m,l 
a.m., AFRf 

* * * 



A NIGHT AT CAESAR'S PUB 

Thursday, February 12 




Extensive D.J sound system set up 
Photo ' Ram Pages 



"Amerika": 

A Commentary 

by John Litzke 

Hollywood, in its infinite absurdity, 
has done it again. For six straight nights 
this past week we were bombarded by 
propaganda of the worst kind, the depic- 
tion of a war in our homeland, of the rev- 
olutionary sort, between Soviet occupied 
America and U.S. revolutionaries. It 
seems to me that the film industry is try- 
ing to satirize a very touchy subject 
when, in real life, the U.S. and U.S.S.R. 
are in the process of sitting down at the 
negotiating table to iron out strategic 
arms disagreements. Not only has this 
movie angered me, but it has angered 
some very big Reds, especially Gorba- 
chev. Is this what the film industry had in 



mind, to instill anger and a sense of dis- 
trust in our political societies, leaders and 
the populace of both continents? 

Is this what America really wants to 
see? Is this movie's purpose to pull 
Americans together to create more unity 
in this country of peace, the land of pros- 
perity and make the Russians (and their 
people) look like the enemy, or is it a 
depiction of what really is to be? The last 
thing on the minds of the Russian and 
American people is war or occupation. 

How could President Reagan allow 
such a picture to be shown? Or is he still 
playing a Hollywood role? 

"Mr. Reagan said he will protect you 
... I don't subscribe to this point of view 
. . . believe me when I say to you ... I 
hope the Russians love their children 
too." 

"Russians," from Sting's 
Dreams of Blue Turtles track 



BLOODMOBILE MEETS 150 PINT GOAL 








My ■ 




■71** i *?BJ 










u 


^W, ^■■■J 






1 *<?* 







Potential blood donors are given an initial blood 
screening by Red Cross Photo /Ram Pages 



Three donors enjoy treat after giving blood in the 
APR Photo/Ram Pages 



ATTENTION SENIORS 

Senior Memories for 
"Cornucopia *%T 
due NOW! 




Good crowds having a good time at Caesar's 
Photo /Ran, Pagrr 



Quiz Yourself 
on Current Events . . . 

1. As the Iran -Contra scandal was un- 
folding in November, a tense confron- 
tation between two senior federal offi- 
cials erupted. Name these two officials. 

2. What prominent person in the current 
Iran-Contra controversy just attempt- 
ed suicide, according to police? 

3. The Ku KIux Klan was recently in a 
Mobile, Alabama court on trial con- 
cerning the 1981 murder committed 
by its members. What is the precedent 
set by the verdict they have received? 

4. What does C3 stand for? 

5. What prominent Pentagon official an- 
nounced his intention to resign? 

6. Who is Joseph Begun? 

7. The Wall Street insider scandal is con- 
tinuing with the recent arrest of three 
high level brokers. Whom did they 
work for? 

Source: The Philadelphia Inquirer, Feb. 15 ; 1987 

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CONGRATULATIONS 

MS. ELY! 

Ms. Ely won the raffle sponsored by 
the Business Club for a $50 gift certificate 
to Conn's Restaurant. Ms. Ely works in 
the Accounting Department Payroll Of- 
fice. Thank you to those who purchased 
raffle tickets. 



ON THE TOWN 

A GUIDE TO WHAT'S HAPPENING IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 




Inside a cabaret in St Petersburg, a scene from Pennsylvania Ballet's "Winter Dreams. " 
Set Design Steve Rubin • Photo Credit Steven Caras 



Winter Dreams 

Pennsylvania Ballet will premiere 
an original three-act story ballet, the first 
full-length ballet ever choreographed by 
artistic director Robert Weiss, at the 
Academy of Music in Philadelphia for 
seven performances, March 11-15. 

The ballet, choreographed in the clas- 
sical idiom, is titled Winter Dreams and 
set to the music of Peter Ilych Tchaikovsky. 

Winter Dreams is set to a collection of 
18 pieces of Tchaikovsky's music with an 
original libretto written in collaboration 
with John Malmstad, a professor of Rus- 
sian literature at Harvard University, and 
Victoria Wyndham, who has starred on 
NBC-TV's "Another World" for over a 
decade. All choreography is by Weiss. 

A $300,000 ballet with more than 100 
costumes and eight different sets, Winter 
Dreams is a love story staged in early 
20th century Russia. It is the story of a 
young count who loses his first great 
love, only to be haunted by her, when 
he begins to give his heart to another. 

Elaborate turn-of-the-century sets and 
costumes are designed by Steve Rubin, 
who in the past has designed Pennsyl- 
vania Ballet's Candide, The Steadfast 
Tin Soldier and Rough Assemblage. 

The Tchaikovsky score includes seg- 
ments from Symphony No. 1 ("Winter 
Dreams"), Symphony No. 6, and the 
operas "Isolanthe," "The Snow Maiden," 
"Eugene Onegin" and "Maid of Orleans." 
Music from "Hamlet" and "The Tempest" 
are also included. 

Music for Winter Dreams has been col- 
lected and researched by Pennsylvania 
Ballet Music Director Maurice Kaplow, 

Certified Scuba Divers 
on Campus? 

Feeling like a fish out of water? We are 
trying to re-start the DVC Scuba Club, 
Call Jamie Connors, 340-1267, for 
details. 




SOPHOMORES: 

If you are attending the Sophomore 
Dinner Dance tonight, and plan to take 
some pictures of those memories, you 
can send your photos to Ram Pages and 
we'll print them for next Friday's paper! 
Just get them to us by Monday evening, 
or by next Monday for the following 
week's paper. 



with additional music composed by Phil- 
adelphian Peter Nocella. Nocella com- 
posed the score for Pennsylvania Ballet's 
Time Passed Summer and created addi- 
tional music for Ballet Theatre's Cinderella. 

Weiss has choreographed a number of 
one-act ballets for Pennsylvania Ballet 
and other major companies, including 
American Ballet Theatre, for whom he 
created A Promise, (75) choreographed 
for Gelsey Kirkland and Ivan Nagy, and 
Awakening, (76) choreographed for 
Kirkland and Mikhail Baryshnikov. Weiss 
also created Leitmotiv or "Light Motif 
(75) for Maurice Bejart's Ballet of the 
20th century. 

Some of the ballets Weiss choreo- 
graphed for Pennsylvania Ballet include 
Ardis & Orrin (Bolero), the highly ac- 
claimed Water Music Suite to the popular 
music of Handel, Concerto for Soprano 
and Orchestra to the music of Reinhold 
Gliere and Bartoks Piano Concerto No. 
3. 

Pennsylvania Ballet's full company of 
36 dancers will appear in Winter Dreams. 

The sets for the ballet are being con- 
structed by Quinlan Scenic Studio, in 
Morton, Pa., with sets being painted in 
Montreal, Canada. Costumes are being 
built by Michael- Jon in New York City. 

Pennsylvania Ballet will perform Win- 
ter Dreams on Wednesday, March 11 at 
8 p.m., Thursday, March 12 at 8 p.m., 
Friday, March 13 at 8 p.m., Saturday, 
March 14 at 1:30 and 8 p.m. and Sun- 
day, March 15 at 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. 

Tickets range in price from $7 to $45 
and may be obtained by calling 215/ 
978-1429 or visiting the Academy of 
Music or Ticketron. 

Billboard's 
Top Five Pop Singles 

WEEK ENDING 2/14/87 

1. "Livin' on a Prayer," Bon Jovi 

2. "Keep Your Hands to Yourself," 
Georgia Satellites 

3. "Will You Still Love Me?", Chicago 

4. "Jacob's Ladder," Huey Lewis & 
the News 

5. "Touch Me," Samantha Fox 

WEEK ENDING 2/26/77 

1. "New Kid in Town," Eagles 

2. Love Theme From A Star is Bom, 
"Evergreen," Barbra Streisand 

3. "Blinded by the Light," Manfred 
Mann's Earth Band 

4. "Fly Like an Eagle," Steve Miller 
Band 

5. "I Like Dreamin'," Kenny Nolan 

WEEK ENDING 2/25/67 

1. "Ruby Tuesday," Rolling Stones 

2. "Love is Here and Now Your 
Gone," Supremes 

3. "Kind of a Drag," Buckinghams 

4. "Baby, I Need Your Lovin'," 
Johnny Rivers 

5. "Georgie Girl," Seekers 



Work 2nd: 
Respect la Requested 

(The following letter was sent to the editor. It con- 
cerns ongoing problems between students living on 
Work Hall, 1st floor and those on the 2nd floor. 
This is addressing those students living on the 2nd 
floor.) 

Dear Editors, 

I am excited to hear of your desire to 
work out something with us on the 1st 
floor. But, where do you think you are 
coming from? You have your loud parties 
until almost any hour of the night and 
make it difficult for many of us to sleep. 
You have even confirmed that you were 
told at least three times by an R. A. and 
Security to quiet down. But did you? 
Why must someone tell you to quiet 
down? Can't you tell that you are being 
too noisy or disturbing someone else? 
Don't you even care? You were warned 
once, but there is no excuse after that. 
Surely you have enough sense to take a 
shower when you smell, don't you? Or 
must someone tell you that too? 

Why don't you have any respect for 
anyone else? How do you expect us to 
even begin to respect you if you can't 
even respect us? Compromise — not 
that's a nice word. We agree to lose a lit- 
tle bit of sleep and not complain or tell 
the R.A.'s or Security, but you continue 
to party at any hour. Give and take? 
Yes, absolutely. We give, you take! 
Again, I say compromise! We have done 
nothing to you except claim a tolerable 
level of quietness that I would hope any 
respectable person would respect (not to 



Are you denying 

yourself 

a better shot 

at grad school? 

Okay, it may be too late to 
get a 40 But its not too late to. 
try to do better on you r LSAT. 
GMAT GRE. or MCAT FoTtKat. 
there s Stanley H Kaplan 

No one has prepped more 
students than Stanley H 
Kaplan Our test taking tech- 
niques and educational 
programs have prepared 
over 1 million students. 

So whatever grad school 
exam youre taking, call us. 
Remember, the person next to 
you during your exam might 
have taken a Kaplan course 

£ KAPLAN 

STANtf Y H K API AN EOUCATIONAl ON TB» LTD 

DON T COMPETE WITH 
A KAPLAN STUDENT-BE ONE 

1528 Walnut Street, 11th Floor 

Philadelphia. PA 19102 

(215)546-3317 

1329 W Cheltenham Avenue 

Melrose Park, PA 19126 

(215)635-3116 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"De/ Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: 12-HorseAle 
Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: $1 Cheesesteak 
Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

/Area's Best Lunches 1 1 AM ■ 3 PM 

Hoppy Hour 4 ■ 6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



mention that this is in the handbook that 
we all signed for) . 

Again, you had a good idea — you 
asked us to go directly to you first to ask 
you to quiet down. 1 respect that idea, 
but one question: How can we go to you 
to ask you to be quiet if an R. A. has told 
you three times and is unsuccessful? 
Would this do any good? Also, one or 
two of us against all of you? No thank 
you. I respect my body; I prefer to abuse 
it serving my employer. Besides, you still 
jeer at us for doing, in reality, nothing to 
you. Personally, I think that is childish, 
well, maybe high schoolish. 1 thought 
this was college. 

1 know you have to blow off steam. 
We all do. Sure, have your parties, but 
keep them respectable, tolerable even. 
Consider those who allow you to live 
around them, who do not force their life- 
styles on you. I agree totally that a little 
noise is tolerable. We tolerate a lot, even 
from our own floor; but we have respect 
when someone asks or even tells us to 
quiet down. This is where we differ from 
you; we do quiet down. (Let me ask 
you, how many chairs must you break 
on the floor? Why must you bang weights 
at 11:30 p.m. And, why don't you trash 
your own bathrooms next time?) 

Thank you for your concern. Think 
about what you are saying. Try some- 
time to focus on someone else in the 
world for once. Things go a lot better 
when we turn our attention towards 
others and not always on ourselves. 

Not who you think, 
Work 1st 



Movies for the Week 

THE BARN 

Over the Top (PG) 

1:00-3:00-5:15- 7:15-9:15 

Outrageous Fortune 

1:30-5:00-7:15-9:30 

Black Widow (R) 

1:45-5:15-7:30-9:45 

Mannequin (PG) 

1:15-3:15-5:30-7:30-9:30 

ROUTE 309 CINEMA 

Critical Condition (R) 
5:30-8:00- 10:15 

Lady and the Tramp (G) 
1:30-3:30 

Star Trek IV (PG) 
2:00 - 5:00 - 7:30 - 9:55 

Over the Top (PG) 
2:00 - 5:00 - 7:50 - 9:30 

From the Hip (PG) 

2:15-5:00-7:15-9:30 

Crocodile Dundee (PG-13) 

2:45-5:30-7:45- 10:15 

Golden Child (PG-13) 
2:30-5:15-7:30-9:45 

Black Widow (R) 
2:15-5:15-7:30-9:45 

Stand By Me (R) 
5:30- 10:15 

The Mission (PG) 
2:30 - 8:00 

Mannequin (PG) 
2:00 - 5:00 - 7:00 - 9:00 



Intramural 




Scoring Leaders 


r> 


by John Litzke 








Name & Team 


G 


Total 


Avg. 


Sterling, BD 


3 


110 


36.6 


Vinitsky, Boff 


2 


43 


21.5 


Zecchino, Terps 


3 


60 


20.0 


Gilbert, R. Rabbi 


5 


95 


19.0 


Courts, WP 


3 


48 


16.0 


Keich, DS 


4 


64 


16.0 


Wisenberg, R. Rabbi 


4 


64 


16.0 


Simononis, EMO 


4 


63 


15.7 


Stanton, PH 


3 


46 


15.3 


B. Boyle, R. Rebels 


5 


66 


13.2 




°Rt 




fcVvj-lJp 



STANDINGS 

SOUTHERN DIVISION -WEST 

Franklin & Marshall 

Gettysburg 

Muhlenberg 

Dickinson 

Western Maryland 

Moravian 

Lebanon Valley 

SOUTHERN DIVISION -EAST 

Widener 
Washington 

Ursinus 

Swarthmore 

Haverford 

Johns Hopkins 

NORTHERN DIVISION -WEST 

Elizabethtown 
Lycoming 

Albright 
Susquehanna 

Juniata 

Messiah 

NORTHERN DIVISION - EAST 

King's 

Scranton 

Delaware Valley 

Wilkes 

FDU-Madison 

Drew 

llfrm J?f|GBs 

TRI[/I/f 
Sports Trivia '87 

The Boston Celtics are currently 
an NBA powerhouse. In '77 and '78, 
they weren't and were among the 
worst In the league. Can you name 
the starting lineup for the Celtics In 
'77 or '78? 

Congratulations to Kevin Stanton. For 
the second week in a row he has given 
the correct answer to the trivia. His cor- 
rect answer was for this question: In 77, 
78 the Portland Trailblazers were NBA 
champs (beating the 76ers in finals) . Can 
you name the starters for Portland? 
Kevin's correct answer is: Maurice Lucas 
F, Bob Gross F, Bill Walton C, Johnny 
Davis G and Lionel Hollins G. 

For his correct answer, Kevin received 
a coupon for a free Aggie Burger, fries 
and Pepsi and you can too if you know 
the answer to this week's question. Just 
put your name and box on a slip of paper 
and place it in Box 951. And remember, 
you can't win if you don't play. 



Intramural Standings 

AS OF 2/12/87 



by John Litzke 






- 


Green 


W 


L 


X 


Running Rebels 


5 





1.000 


EMO 


3 


2 


.600 


Psychotic Hoop 


2 


1 


.666 


Gargoyles 


2 


3 


.400 


Bambino Magicians 


1 


3 


.250 


Wolf Pack 


1 


3 


.250 


Space Between 





3 


.000 


Gold 


w 


L 


% 


Double Stuff 


4 





1.000 


Blue Demons 


2 


1 


.666 


Terps 


2 


1 


.666 


Running Rabbi's 


2 


3 


.400 


Boffers 


1 


3 


.250 


Agboh 





3 


.000 



Wednesday's (2/4) Games 

Running Rebels 52, Gargoyles 44 
Terps 52, Running Rabbi's 48 
EMO 51, Bambino Magicians 43 

Tuesday's (2/10) Games 

Wolf Pack 50, Space Between 28 
Double Stuff 75, Agboh 48 
EMO 51, Gargoyles 46 
Running Rebels 46, Psychotic Hoop 44 
Running Rabbi's 41, Boffers 33 

Thursday's (2/12) Games 
Blue Demons 95, Terps 56 
Double Stuff 87, Running Rabbi's 55 
Boffers 59, Agboh 25 
Running Rebels 58, Space Between 34 
Psychotic Hoop 60, EMO 56 
Gargoyles 50, Bambino Magicians 49 



WOLF PACK, RABBIS, EMO 
WIN IN WEEK 4 

Wolf Pack 50, Space Between 28 

J.J. Courts' team-game high 17 and 
Joe McLaughlin's 12 paced the Wolf 
Pack (1-3) to easy victory over Space 
Between (0-2) . Ray Boltz led Space Be- 
tween with 12 and Space center Craig 
Pierce added a game-high nine rebounds. 

WP SB 

Courts 17 Snader 1 

Seidel 3 Pierce 3 

McLaughlin 12 Boltz 12 

Pietrefesa 8 Martella 5 

Powell 6 Spangler 

Annan 2 Bachur 

Myers 2 Brittner 2 

Hatch 3- 

Officials: Estep, Wood 

Double Stuff 75, Agboh 48 

Double Stuff (3-0) remained unde- 
feated receiving balanced scoring up and 
down the lineup while subs Paul Sterling 
and Rob Benner led Agboh (0-2) with 29 
and 13 respectively. 

EMO 51, Gargoyles 46 

At DVC. EMO (3-1) received 12 from 
Rich Simononis and 10 from Sean Smith 
plus balanced scoring throughout the 
lineup to give EMO the close victory 
Chris Mucci and Paul Knight had 11 
each for the Gargoyles (1-3). 

EMO GAR 

McNulty Mucci 11 

Kobryznski 6 Butcher 2 

Heisy 2 Cooper 4 

Fox Herring 10 

Simononis 12 Hartung 6 

Lewandowski 7 Knight 1 1 

Sucoloski 4 Bachinsky 2 

Schade 8 

Williams 
Canale 2 

Smith 10 

Officials: B. Boyle, Leinbach 



DOUBLE STUFF, RUNNING REBS 

STAY UNBEATEN; 

BOFFERS WIN FIRST 

Blue Demons 95, Terps 56 

At DVC, Paul Sterling poured in a 
game-high 34 and Leo Reaver 28 as the 
Blue Demons (2-1) won this Gold divi- 
sion contest. The Terps (2-1) were paced 
by a fine performance from Don Zec- 
chino who had 28 and Mike Lewandow- 
ski had 18. 

Double Stuff 87, Running Rabbi's 55 

Double Stuff (4-0) took a 45-24 half- 
time lead and never looked back on its 
way to a 87-55 win over the Running 
Rabbi's (2-3). Double Stuff was led by 
Dave Keich's 22 and "Big Nol" Brandt 
Nolan's 18. The Rabbi's received 20 
from Dave Weisenberg and 18 from 
Frank Gilbert. 

Boffers 59, Agboh 25 

At DVC, the Boffers (1-3) doubled 
Agboh (0-3) paced by Vinitsky's 24 and 
Melma's 13 while Fritche was high man 
for Agboh with 19. in this Gold division 
matchup. 

R. Rebels 58, Space Between 34 

Bob Kennedy's game-leading 12 points 
and 14 rebounds, and balanced scoring 
from the Running Rebels (5-0) paced 
them to the victory over Space Between 
(0-3) . Ray Boltz led Space Between with 
12 points. 

Psychotic Hoop 60, EMO 56 

Psychotic Hoop (2-1) pulled out a 
squeaker over second place EMO (3-2) 
to keep them in the division race. For- 
ward Kevin Stanton had a fabulous 
game with 23 and Chuck Carter added 
10 for the victors. EMO received season 
high's from Rich Simononis with 24 and 
Sean Smith with 16. Freshman Eric 
Schade led all rebounders with 12. 

Gargoyles 50, B. Magicians 49 

Behind 18 from Doug Herring and 13 
from Larry Hepner the Gargoyles (2-3) 
edged the Bambino's (1-3) 50-49 in a 
Green division contest. John Sukeena 
led the Bambino Magicians with 16 while 
Clay Butterworth had 1 1 points and 14 
rebounds. 

R. Rebels 46, Psychotic Hoop 44 

The first place Running Rebels (4-0) 
won a close battle over Psychotic Hoop 
(1-1) 46-44 at DVC in front of a near 
capacity crowd. Paul Leinbach and the 
Boyle brothers each had 10 while Kevin 
Stanton had 12 and Chuck Carter eight 
for the defeated. 

RR PH 

Brennan 5 Vandeberghe 3 

Arnold 2 Wheaton 7 

Kennedy 5 Widmer 2 

Leinbach 10 McSherry 6 

C. Boyle 10 Calderaio 6 

B.Boyle 10 Stanton 12 

Snyder 4 Carter 8 

Officials: Kobryznski, Simononis 

Running Rabbi's 41, Boffers 33 

Frank Gilbert hit 12 FG and three of 
three from the line for 27 points to pace 
the Running Rabbi's (2-2) to a win in a 
closely matched game over the Boffers 
(0-3) who received output from Hamm 
with nine and White with eight. 

RR B 

Stamm 8 Hamm 9 

Gilbert 27 Ford 6 

Cimochowski 2 White 8 

Clair 4 Melma 4 

Burkhardt Brauker 4 

Hartzell Martinelli 2 

Orban 

Officials: Delaney, Zendt 




SPORTS' BRIEFS '87 

by John Litzke 

• At midseason, Sixers are in a decline 
and searching for a starting center and 
a new health plan. At 28-22, Sixers 
nine back of first place Boston with 
Moses and Washington just IV2 behind. 

•Another strike in the NFL? Well, it 
looks that way if questions such as the 
grievance process, player pensions 
and safety and welfare are not resolved. 
Strike '87. 

• British Bulldogs lose title to Hart Foun- 
dation. Hulk Hogan defeats Kamala, 
the 400 lb. Ugandan Hollywood drop- 
out and will wrestle, get this, Andre the 
Giant, Hulk's former ally in Wrestle- 
mania HI. Macho Man Randy Savage 
defeated Ricky Steamboat. Honky 
Tonk Man pins Koko B. Ware in major 
bouts. 

• St. Joseph's loses super center Rodney 
Blake indefinitely due to ankle injury. 
Meanwhile, Temple ranked *6 in both 
polls. 

• NHL and Soviet Nationals split best of 
two series in Rendevous '87. 

•The Philadelphia Girls Public League 
Playoffs are set and the following 
schools are involved: Dobbins, Ger- 
mantown, University City, Frankford, 
William Penn, Bok, Lincoln, Martin 
Luther King, Southern, Girls High, 
Gratz, Olney, Bartram and Washington. 

• Players from both N.Y. Giants and 
Denver Broncos have admitted to 
scalping Super Bowl tickets. 

• Mets set to defend. Spring training 
begins in, get this, one week. 




II I llllll IT'S BACK !! Ill III! 

AEROBICS 

Every Monday & Wednesday 

4:15 to 5:45 P.M. 

IN THE ALL-PURPOSE ROOM 

STARTING FEBRUARY 2 

Gef a jump on summer!!! 

Look and feel better! 
Come out and participate! 



DVC POUNDS MESSIAH, FDU; KINGS TOO MUCH 




by John Litzke 

DVC had an easy time Of it back on 
February 16 when they played a 2-16 
but tenacious Messiah Falcon club and 
came out on top 92-80. 

In the first half DVC controlled play 
and at the 11:38 mark led by 15 at 23-8. 
With strong play from O'Neil Arlington 
and Charlie Anderson, who each had 12 
first half points, Messiah battled back to 
tie it at 42 with 40 seconds left in the half. 
One out of two foul shots by John Boone 
gave DVC the lead at the half 43-42. 

Dwight Weldon, sophomore from 
Wissahickon, was the man in the first half 
hitting eight of 10 FG and two out of 
three from the line for 18 first half points. 
Boone, Butts and Sutrynowicz each 
added 6. 

The second half would prove to be as 
close as the end of the first half with Ar- 
rington and senior Chris Goettke keeping 
the feisty Falcons close. Messiah couldn't 
keep the pace against a multi-faceted 
DVC attack. DVC pulled to a consider- 
able lead at 1:22 of the game by a score 
of 85-78 and the final score of 92-80 
would be their largest lead in the second 
half. 




DVC was led by a fine performance 
from Dwight Weldon with a season -high 
31 and Joe Butts and John Boone had 
17 and 16 respectively. O'Neil Arrington 
was tops for Messiah with 28 and Chris 
Goettke had 14. On the night DVC hit 
36 baskets and 15 of 21 from the line. 

DVC completed the home-and-home 
series with FDU-Madison and split the 
series following their 78-62 thrashing of 
the Jersey Devils at Work Gym for DVC's 
third win in a row. FDU never led in this 
contest with the exception of two one- 
point leads midway through the first half. 



DVC, behind Weldon's 10 and Boone's 
eight, took a 37-32 halftime advantage 
with Floyd Adams leading the way for 
FDU with 12. 

The relentless pounding continued 
and the Devils were iced. Weldon and 
John Jones each finished with 15 and 
Boone and Butts finished with 14 and 13 
respectively. This put DVC at 13-9 over- 
ail and 8-5 in the league and in a solid 
third place in the MAC Northeast divi- 
sion in back of Kings and Scranton with a 
return match against first place, 18-3 
Kings coming next at Kings. 

The big, bad Kings Monarchs were the 
foes and that 63-62 loss to DVC, back 
on December 1, I'm sure, remained per- 
manently etched in their memories. 
They were out for revenge and revenge 
they got as Ed Moyer had 33 and Joe 
Flaherty added 18 in DVC's 99-83 loss 
last Saturday. 

DVC gave it their all in the first half 
and led by as much as 13 early on at 
24-11 to the total disbelief of the Kings 
fans, which pleased me. Then Kings' 
main man. 6-7 Ed Moyer. went to work. 
Kings battled back and took a 41-40 lead 
at the half, still a nailbiter. Weldon hit for 
14 first half points and John Jones 10 
while Moyer had 14 and Hessling eight 
for Kings. 

The second half went all Kings way as 
they led by as much as 25 enroute to 
their victory. DVC never gave up and 
that shows poise and maturity. Kings did 
much of their damage in the second half 
from the free-throw line as they finished 
18 of 23 to DVC's seven of 11. 




Tennis at DVC could prtsiuce stars like this guy. 

TENNIS AT DVC 

Yes, a spring tennis team is being 
organized here at DVC. If anyone is in- 
terested in playing spring tennis, please 
contact Jerry Fntz, Box *1133. 






UNDEFEATED SHAWN SMITH 
LEADING DVC WRESTLERS 



Women's Floor Hockey 



_ by Joe Ferry 



Undefeated in 19 matches so far this 
season, two-time NCAA Division III 
wrestling champion Shawn Smith is hav- 
ing another great year, but on this year's 
Aggie wrestling squad, Smith is far from 
being alone. 

After pinning lopsided losses on Mora- 
vian (54-6) and Scranton (50-4) on Feb. 
7, the Aggies have run their unbeaten 
streak to 14 consecutive meets and in- 
creased their overall record to 14-2. 
Their only two losses have come to Divi- 
sion I opponents Brown and Springfield. 

DVC presently has five wrestlers, 
besides Smith, who are undefeated: 
Vince Bedesem (Council Rock HS/ 
Newtown, Pa), 17-0; Garth Lakitsky 
(Tamaqua HS/Tamaqua, Pa.), 14-0-1; 
Randy Worrall (Shawnee HS/Shawnee, 
NJ), 8-0; Rick Williams (Susquerita HS/ 
Duncannon, Pa.), 9-0-1; and Dan Canale 
(Lenape HS/Lenape, NJ), 6-0. 

Jim Bodai (Wilson HS/Easton, Pa.) is 
18-1, Chuck Heiber (C.B. East HS/ 
Buckingham, Pa.) is 13-5 and Tracy 
Snyder (Tri Valley HS/Pittman, NJ) is 
13-4-1. 

But it is Smith that the Aggies look to 
for inspiration and leadership. 

"Shawn is having another great year," 
said head coach Bob Marshall. "But we 
more or less expected him to this season. 

"At this point, Shawn is something like 
61-0 against Division III opponents in 
his career. His only two losses have 
come in the NCAA Division I champion- 
ships last year, after he won the Division 
III championship. 

"We do look to him for leadership, 
and he seems to make everyone better 
and more intense. The nice thing about 
this season is that we have so many other 
wrestlers doing well 

"People like Jim Bodai, Chuck Heiber, 
Vince Bedesem and Randy Worrell are 
all having good years. 

"And looking forward to the MAC 
Championships (Feb. 27 & 28), we feel 



that we have quite a few potential con- 
ference champions." 

Smith leads the team with a total of 
106 team points on five pins and eight 
technical falls, while Bedesem is second 
with 87 points and Lakitsky is third with 
81 points. 

The Aggies have two meets remaining 
before the MAC's: February 1 1 at Eliza- 
bethtown and February 14 at Western 
Maryland. The MAC's will be held this 
year at Western Maryland. 

SCORES TO DATE: 

Brown 25, DVC 12 
Springfield 25, DVC 19 
DVC 47, NYU 5 
DVC 44, Swarthmore 4 
DVC 48, Delaware State 12 
DVC 27, Ursinus 16 
DVC 40, Lafayette 8 
DVC 46, Kean 8 
DVC 46, Seton Hall 3 
DVC 48, Villanova 6 
DVC 29, Lycoming 10 
DVC 50, Gettysburg 
DVC 58, Widener 
DVC 44, Kings 7 
DVC 54, Moravian 6 
DVC 50, Scranton 4 





Jelly 13, Waxettes 2 

Jelly (3-0) won by the score of 13-2. 
Connie Hajioannou scored one goal for 
the Waxettes (2-1) while goalie for Jelly, 
Tina Drey, mistakenly scored for the 
Waxettes. The scorers for Jelly were: 
Dee Pisauro with six, Trish Moorzitz with 
two, Debbie Masciulli with two, Amy 
Ruth with two and Lori Luciano with 
one. 

Mother Puckers 2, Waxettes 

Mother Puckers (2-2) won by the 
score of 2-0 in a game against the Wax- 
ettes (2-2) played on Thursday, Feb. 12. 



Answer to last week's 
Collegiate Camouflage. 




Trish Dollarton and Becky Rice each 
scored one goal for the Mother Puckers. 

K.K.P.W. 12, Berk 1st 3 

Tammy Petraskie led the K.K.P.W. to 
a victory Tuesday evening over the girls 
from Berk 1st. Tammy had seven goals 
with help from Stacy Yoder, Chris Ritter, 
Lisa Long, Barb Hemler and Laura Etz- 
weiler each adding a goal. Most of the 
scoring for the K.K.P.W. was done in the 
first two periods. They came on strong in 
the first period with Tammy's initial goal 
occurring within the first ten seconds of 
play. Goalie Michelle Shirk held Berk 1st 
to only three goals. They were shared by 
Dee Pisauro with two and Beth Kan- 
chipped in with one. 

The K.K.P.W. won last week by forfeit 
over Dairy which puts their record at 2-0. 



STAFF 

EditorsinChief John D. Ebert 

and Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Entertainment Editor . Kevin Dickmyer 

Reporters . . Mike Bolles, Jerry L. Fritz, 

Melanie O'Neill, Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See new In the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 






EMtomiKe Wilted ©®fllks(g© 



Vol. XXI. No. 19 

Friday, February 27, 1987 




NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



Dear Editor - Page 3 



EVERY DVC GRADUATE IS HIRED! 



by Joe Ferry 

Students who seek a rewarding career 
along with a well-rounded education 
would do well to look at a "Higher and 
Hire" education offered by DVC. 

Placement figures for the college's 
Class of 1986 have been tabulated and 
they show that 100% of the 242 gradu- 
ates who entered the job market within 
six months of graduation are currently 
employed or enrolled in graduate school. 
Two graduates who chose not to seek 
employment for personal reasons are not 
included in the survey which is required 
by the Pennsylvania State Department of 
Higher Education. 

Even more impressive is the fact that 
85.8% of those who are employed are 
working within their major field of study. 
Among the career opportunities pursued 
by 1986 grads are sales, research, pro- 
duction supervision, quality control in- 
spection and management training. 

Other graduates are enrolled in medi- 
cal, dental or veterinary schools as well 
as schools of optometry, podiatry and 
osteopathic. Still others are continuing 
their education in the fields of medical 
technology, physical therapy, occupa- 
tion therapy, nursing and sports medicine. 



"These employment figures are a trib- 
ute to our hard-working students and our 
dedicated faculty," said H. William 
Craver, Director of Placement. "All we in 
the Placement Office can do is make sure 
the employment opportunities are avail- 
able. It's up to the individual student to 
land the job." 

One of the reasons for the college's 
outstanding placement rate is its educa- 
tional philosophy of science with practice. 

Some of the services provided by the 
Placement Office include conducting 
seminars on resume writing and inter- 
view techniques, maintaining bulletin 
boards filled with full time, part-time and 
summer job opportunities and hosting 
personnel representatives from industry 
on campus. Each year, nearly 200 com- 
panies send their recruiters to DVC to 
conduct interviews and review resume 
files. 

The single biggest recruiting visitation 
by industry is on Career Day, which was 
held on February 18 this year. Approxi- 
mately 85 companies — the most ever 
— signed up to participate in Career 
Day, which ran from 11 a.m. -4 p.m. in 
the All-Purpose Room of the Student 
Center. 



One result of the latest employment statistics is this, 
the latest ad chosen for release: 



100* 
Employed! 



Every one of the 244 
graduates of Delaware Valley 
College Class of '86 is cm- 
ployed or in graduate school. 
Just as significant. 86''o arc 
working in their chosen fields 
of study. 

For the previous scars of 
1983. 1984 and 1985, com- 


Majors 

D Agronomy 

□ Agribusiness 

D Animal Husbandry 

D Biology 

Q Business Administration 

□ Chemistry 

□ Computer Information 
Systems Management 

□ Dairy Husbandry 

□ Food Industry 

□ Horticulture 

D Ornamental Horticulture 

Specializalions 

□ Equine Science 

.' \car -turn imc 
Vk'trrr Pmgraiii 

D Accounting 

D Computer Information 

Systems 
D Business 
D Floriculture 

□ Landscape/Nursery 
D Laboratory Animal 

Management 
D Livestock Management 
D Equine Management 
D Food Science 
D Food Technology 

□ Food Services 
Management 

D Medical Technology 

□ Turf and Grounds 
Mnnnecmcnt 




•A 


parable records averaged over 
97 r o employed and over 82 r o 
in their chosen fields. 

How's that 
for Hire 


Delaware 

Valley 

College 


■ 1 I A» f% 




liM 1 fc! 1 1 IM 




Delaware Valley College 
stresses study with practice — 
hands-on learning and a 
24-week on-the-job training 
program This, plus a highly- 
qualified faculty and a skilled 
placement department, re- 
sults in high demand and 
high regard for Delaware 
Valley College graduates by 
employers. 

Delaware Valley College 
offers 4-year Bachelor of 
Science degree programs in 
the following subjects: 


Be part of the difference 
at DelVal, call toll-free or 
write for more information. 
Director of Admissions 
Delaware Valley College 
Doylestown, PA 18901 

i -mo- me -moo Is pa 

l-MO-DVC-7000 ouiv.de PA 

U progwni olHtO without rtgtrH 
id <ac t color mi national ongm 
ita«acap o' to* ai ptMdKl oy <a» 



Degree Program 

Agribusiness 

Animal Science 

Dairy Husbandry 

Food Science* 

Agronomy 

Horticulture 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Business Administration 

Biology 

Chemistry 

TOTALS 



Employed 
In Field Of 
Preparation 

2 
23 

8 

7 

19 
14 
41 
52 
14 

8 
198 



Employed 

In Other 

Field 

1 
8 
1 
1 
2 

1 
9 
3 
2 
28 



Employed 
Part-Time 


1 






1 
1 



3 



Pursuing 

Advanced 

Degree 


9 
(J 
1 
2 
1 
1 



5 

2 

21 



Not 

Seeking 

Employment 









2 


2 



One person each from Food Science and Chemistry are in the military service 
These figures were supplied to the Pennsylvania Department of Higher Education 



CAREER DAY IS A SUCCESS ONCE AGAIN! 

by Ann Whitesell 



The Fifth Annual Career Day at DVC 
was on the whole a great success. Thanks 
must go to Mr. Craver, the Placement 
Office staff and the companies that came. 
The exact numbers for attendance are 
not in yet, but estimations are that about 
three-fourths of the junior and senior 
classes attended; many sophomores and 
freshmen came in to look around. 

To see what students thought of this 
Career Day, I talked to several from each 
degree program . The biology and chem- 
istry majors were usually waiting in line 
for some of the major research labs. "If 
you're not into lab animal work totally, 
Smith, Kline and French won't even take 
your resume." Another student com- 
mented that he wanted to talk to the 
U.S. D. A. but they cancelled. The biology 
majors I talked to agreed that "There are 
definitely summer internships if you want 
them." Food industry majors noted that 
the companies they talked to seemed 
eager to discuss future positions, but the 
summer internships were limited. 

On the ornamental horticulture and 
horticulture front the job prospects looked 
like roses and peaches. The young lady I 
spoke with said, "The companies were 

CAMPUS CANDID 
DVC "HANDS-ON" 




looking for full time employees which 
was nice to know because in a year or so 
I'll be looking for a full time job." In the 
ornamental horticulture area I heard a 
couple of students say, "They are just 
here promoting their companies, and 
maybe they'll interview you later. On the 
other hand, they're letting the students 
know what's going on in the business." 
Another student said, "There was a wide 
spectrum of companies and they were 
hiring for full time positions." 

I also talked to some agribusiness ma- 
jors and they said, "This is the best thing 
to hit the school. A lot of companies are 
looking for agri-sales people." Even the 
animal husbandry majors were talking 
positive, "The companies that I've talked 
to today are offering everything from re- 
search lab jobs to farm supply and food 
marketing sales positions. I also saw 
some breeder service companies." 

On a whole your reaction to this Career 
Day depends on who you talked to and 
if the student was ready to meet the 
rigors of interviewing. All I know is this 
opportunity gives the student a chance to 
meet people in their field of study and 
make contacts in the business world. 




: 



* * * * 

This Week on 

iiB. 

Campus 



Dwight Wallace combines art and science with a tee 
square and some horticultural knowledge 
Photo /Ram Pages 



by W.L. Unger 
FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 27 

W (A) MACs, Weston Maryland 

SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 28 

Leadership Conferen ce s, 9 am -5 
p.m. in the Student Center 

SUNDAY, MARCH 1 

Lenape Valley Chamber Ensemble, 
3-5 p.m. In the APR. 

MONDAY, MARCH 2 

Faculty Development Committee 
Lecture: 'Technology, Tod for the 
Small Busrnesi" 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4 

Ash Wednesday 

Film: Poke Academy ffl, 9 p.m. in 

the APR 




ON THE TOWN 

A GUIDE TO WHAT'S HAPPENING IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 



by Kevin Dickmyer 

Movies for the Week 

THE BARN -343-2088 

Over the Top (PG) 
1:00-3:00-5:15-7:15-9:15 

Outrageous Fortune 
1:30-5:00-7:00-9:00 

Black Widow (R) 
1:45-5:15-7:30-9:30 

Mannequin (PG) 
1:15-3:15-5:30-7:30-9:30 

Platoon (R) 
2:00-5:00-7:15-9:30 

ROUTE 309 CINEMA -646 4551 

Critical Condition (R) 
2:45 - 8:00 

Lady and the Tramp (G) 
1:30-3:30 

Star Trek IV (PG) 
2:00 - 5:00 - 7:30 - 10:00 

Over the Top (PG) 
5:30-7:45- 10:15 

From the Hip (PG) 
5:45- 10:15 

Crocodile Dundee (PG-13) 
2:30 - 5:30 - 7:45 - 10:00 

Golden Child (PG-13) 
2:15-5:15-7:30- 10:00 

Black Widow (R) 
2:15-5:15-7:30-9:45 

Stand By Me (R) 
5:30- 10:15 

The Mission (PG) 
2:30 - 7:30 

Mannequin (PG) 
2:15-5:00-7:15-9:30 

Death Before Dishonor (R) 
2:00-5:00-7:15-9:30 



At the Movies 

* *• * Excellent •••Good ++Fair -kPoor 

Outrageous Fortune (R) it it if it 

Bettc Midler and Shelley Long are the 
two most appealing buddies to hit the 
road since Hope and Crosby, but a lot 
more outrageously raunchy. Hell may 
hath no fury like a woman scorned, but 
Outrageous Fortune proves comic heaven 
hath no fun like two women scorned. 

Stand By Me (R) • * • • 

A pre-teen diner set in small-town 
Oregon in 1959. Four youths spend the 
Labor Day weekend, before they begin 
junior high, looking for the half-buried 
corpse of a boy their age. Unexpectedly 
moving. 

Star Trek IV (PG) • • • 

Platoon (R) • • • 

The Mission (PG) • • • 

Crocodile Dundee (PG-13) • • • 

Black Widow (R) • * 

Critical Condition (R) • • 

From the Hip (PG) • * 

The Golden Child (PG-13) * • 

Mannequin (PG) * * 

Over the Top (PG) • * 

Source: The Philadelphia Inquirer 



VORDS UNUNITED 

Typing/Word Processing Services 

Resumes • Cover Letters 

failings • Term Papers • Theses 

Dissertations 

PICK-UP & DELIVERY! 

Need something typed? 
CALL WS-9776. 



IN THE PUB 



VICTORIAN PHOTOS' 

Tuesday, February 17 



"CARICATURES" 

Tuesday, February 10 





Photo /Ram Pages 

Billboard's 
Top Selling Records 

WEEK ENDING 2/21/87 

TOP ALBUMS 

1. Slippery When Wet, Bon Jovi 

2. Licensed To III, Beastie Boys 

3. Night Songs, Cinderella 

4. The Way It Is, Bruce Hornsby 

5. Georgia Satellites, Georgia 
Satellites 

6. Control, Janet Jackson 

7. Invisible Touch, Genesis 

8. Different Light, Bangles 

9. Third Stage, Boston 

10. Fore!, Huey Lewis & the News 

TOP SINGLES 

1. "Livin' on a Prayer," Bon Jovi 

2. "Jacob's Ladder," Huey Lewis & 
the News 

3. "Keep Your Hands to Yourself," 
Georgia Satellites 

4. "Will You Still Love Me?", Chicago 

5. "You Got It All," The Jets 



Photo/ Ram Pages 

6. "Somewhere Out There," Linda 
Ronstadt & James Ingram 

7. "Respect Yourself," Bruce Willis 

8. "Fight for Your Right," Beastie 
Boys 

9. "Big Time," Peter Gabriel 
10. "Ballerina Girl," Lionel Richie 

WEEK ENDING 3/5/77 

1. Love Theme From A Star is Bom, 
"Evergreen," Barbra Streisand 

2. "New Kid in Town," Eagles 

3. "Fly Like an Eagle," Steve Miller 
Band 

4. "1 Like Dreamin'," Kenny Nolan 

5. "Blinded by the Light," Manfred 
Mann's Earth Band 

WEEK ENDING 2/26/72 

1. "Without You," Nllsson 

2. "Let's Stay Together," Al Green 

3. "Hurting Each Other," Carpenters 

4. "Precious and Few," Climax 

5. "Never Been to Spain," Three Dog 
Night 



"Beanstalk" a Success! 

Last December the DVC Players per- 
formed Jack and the Beanstalk for a 
packed house. There was a fantastic 
response from the community. We sold 
out over 300 seats in two days. The 
feedback from the parents was so strong 
that the DVC Players have decided to do 
another children's show. Our auditions 
will be held on March 2 at 7:30 p.m. in 
the Coffeehouse. The performance dates 
have been set for May 1, 2 and 3. Come 
on over and try out. We're all looking 
forward to a lot of fun! 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 

INTERVIEWS FOR THE 

WEEK OF MARCH 2 

Monday, March 2 

PENNINK & ARRIMOUR 

LANDSCAPERS 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Tuesday, March 3 

MOON/RICKERT NURSERIES 
Southern States Co-operative* 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Wednesday, March 4 

DREAMSCAPE 
9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

DVC DAIRY INTERNSHIP 
Interviews in AG 112 starting 7 p.m. 

PLEASE NOTE: There will be an in- 
formal meeting Monday evening, 7 
p.m. in the Student Center Room 
203 for all people who sign up for 
Southern States. You must attend this 
meeting if you are interviewing on 
Tuesday. 

NOTICE TO ALL SENIORS: 

The yearbook staff needs your senior 
memories immediately or forget about 
seeing them in the yearbook. 



Indoor Track Results 
- MACs - 

Men's Distance Medley: Rueb, Enoch, 

Benner, Spotts, 10:15.91, 3rd, 
Women's Shot Put: R. Kunkel, 

35 '73/4", 2nd 
Women's Long Jump: R. Kunkel, 

16'1V2", 3rd 
Women's Triple Jump: R. Kunkel, 

36 '2 ",5th 
Women's High Jump: R. Kunkel, 5' 
Men's 3,000 Meter: T. Donofrio, 10.09 
Men's Triple Jump: P. Sperry, 40 '1", 

7th 
Women's 55 Meter: D. Albert, 8.3 
Men's 55 High Hurdles: M. Brinsky, 

8.09 
Men's 55 High Hurdles: P. Sperry, 

8.46 
Men's 55 High Hurdles: C. Delaney, 

8.64 
Women's 400 Meter: C. Hajioannou, 

66.49 
Men's 400 Meter: T. Makowski, 55.81 
Men's 400 Meter: T. Allen, 56.21 




CYCLING NEWS 

To all cyclists on campus and off: The 
Cycling Club will have their first meeting 
on March 4, 1987 at 7 p m. in the Music 
Room . We will be planning the first rides 
for the semester and there will be a dem- 
onstration on sizing a bike 'or any person. 

The club is also spon.soring two trips to 
the Trexlertown Velodrome later in the 
semester. 

A DAY COVER CONTEST 

Design a cover for the A-Day Program 
and win $50.00. Must represent all ma- 
jors at DVC. Judging will take place on 
Monday, March 16 at the A-Day Meeting. 



Spectrum Makes Concert 

History with Record-Breaking 

Total for 1986 

A record-breaking 69 concerts coupled 
with a national high of eight top-grossing 
concerts made The Spectrum the nation's 
most popular concert facility in 1986. 

According to Amusement Business, 
one of the most important publications in 
the entertainment industry, "The Spec- 
trum was the most popular venue" in the 
nation for concerts during the past year. 
The Spectrum claimed eight entries 
among the magazine's Top 100 Box- 
scores — more than any other facility in 
the entire country. In addition to The 
Spectrum, the Centrum in Worcester, 
Ma., which, like The Spectrum, is man- 
aged by Spectacor Management, claimed 
second place with six entries in the Top 
100. 

"It is a great honor to be recognized as 
the top concert facility in the nation," 
said Spectrum general manager Edward 
J. Rubinstein. "It truly is a tribute to the 



residents of the Delaware Valley who 
have been such loyal concert supporters 
for almost 20 years. We made great 
strides and broke some existing records 
in 1986, including 26 concerts taking 
place within a two- month time span. I 
know The Spectrum has always been a 
favorite for performers and fans alike, 
and we intend to do our best to keep it 
that way for many years to come." 

The Spectrum also placed among the 
publication's "Top 10 Concerts of 1986" 
with four sold-out Genesis concerts on 
September 24, 25, 26 and 27. The four 
sell-outs, which grossed $1,214,773. 
and drew 73,230 persons, made Genesis 
The Spectrum's number one grossing 
concert for the year. 

The 69 concerts for 1986, which in- 
cluded 44 sell-outs, surpassed all pre- 
vious records in The Spectrum's 19-year 
history for the number of concerts in one 
year. This total broke the previous Spec- 
trum high of 58 concerts in 1984. A total 
of 977,555 concert fans passed through 
The Spectrum's doors last year. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Val's home away from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: 12-HorseAle 
Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: $1 Cheesesteak 
Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

Area's Best Lunches 11 AM -3 PM 

Happy Hour 4 - 6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
346-1968 




. ATTENTION 
BODYBUILDERS! 

GET READY, PUMP UP!! The North- 
east Regional Charity Cup Bodybuilding 
Competition is set for Saturday, June 
20, at Strat Haven High School. All pro- 
ceeds from this NPC sanctioned compe- 
tition will benefit the American Diabetes 
Association. The Charity Cup is celebrat- 
ing its Fifth Anniversary, and with Debbie 
Sider featured as the guest poser, the 
event is shaping up to be a spectacular 
one! Last year in Bucks County, the 
competition attracted over 55 competitors 
and 500 spectators! 

Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m.; 
pre- judging at 11 a.m. and the final 
show will begin at 6 p.m. Divisions will 
include open, women's, novice and 
couples. To enter you must have an 
NPC card which can be purchased at the 
event. Trophies will be awarded to the 
top four places. THIS IS A REGIONAL 
QUALIFIER. 

For more information, please contact 
the American Diabetes Association at 
627-7718. GET READY AND PUMP 
UP FOR THE CHARITY CUP, AND 
HELP TO STRENGTHEN THE FIGHT 
AGAINST DIABETES. 



Are you denying 

yourself 

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Okay, it may be too late to 
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try to do better on you r LSAT. 
GMATXRE. or MCAT FonKat. 
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Kaplan Our test taking tech- 
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So whatever grad school 
exam youre taking, call us 
Remember, the person next to 
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What's News? 

Dear Editor and Students, 

Do you know that along with Ram 
Pages there is another school newspaper 
called the Campus Communicator? I ask 
why? Why are there two newspapers — 
one for the students and one for the ad- 
ministrators and staff? It does not make 
sense to this Ram Pages staffer! 

The administration claims that this is a 
total community, you know, like a "fami- 
ly." Then why separate faculty and ad- 
ministration news from student news? 
Oh, the students might hear that even 
the teachers are debating the issue of 
changing the name of our school, or that 
one of the teachers has obtained his doc- 
torate! (Congrats, Dr. Montileone, a little 
late, but that's what happens when the 
students don't get the news.) There are 
many other facets that are covered in the 
Campus Communicator that 1 believe 
the students should have access to. 
Don't get me wrong, the Campus Com- 
municator is a vital source of information 
for the campus, but it should be combined 
with Ram Pages. 

Sincerely, 
Ann Whitesell 



Quiz Yourself 
on Current Events . . . 

1. What major political announcement 
occurred on a New York radio talk 
show? 

2. What small controversy erupted just 
before the Miss USA Pageant? 

3. Who has finally been endorsed as 
the Philadelphia Republican Mayoral 
candidate? 

4. The U.S. State Department is said to 
have taken unusual steps in heading 
off a White House plan for a joint 
U.S. -Egyptian action. What was the 
plan? 

5. President Reagan may have given 
conflicting testimony on what key 
point during his two appearances in 
front of the Iranscam commission? 

6. The U.S. exercised its veto in the U.N. 
Security Council, for what reason? 

7. At an international peace forum held 
in Moscow, what most unusual scene 
unfolded? 

8. According to newly published re- 
search, what ailment is suspected to 
be caused by a defective gene on 
chromosome 21? 

Source: The Philadelphia Inquirer, Feb. 22, 1987 

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Residence Hall Closing 
Spring Recess 

Please be advised that the college will 
be closed beginning at 4 p.m. Friday, 
March 6, 1987. All students will leave 
the residence halls by 8 p.m. 

Residence halls will reopen on Sun- 
day, March 15, beginning at 12 noon. 

No one will be permitted in the resi- 
dence halls during the vacation period 
except those students who will be involved 
in the Work Study Program, or by spe- 
cial permission from the Residence Life 
Office. Please come to the Residence 
Life Office to make arrangements for 
your room during that week. 

If you have permission to stay in the 
dormitory over Spring Break, women 
residents must use their access card to 
gain entry into the building since Security 
will be locking all dorms. 

Before leaving for the holidays, it is re- 
quested that: 

1. Windows be locked and drapes or 
shades drawn. 

2. Doors be locked and as many valu- 
ables as possible be removed. 

3. All appliances be unplugged. 

4. Rooms be cleaned and all trash put in 
proper receptacles. 

There will be a spot check room in- 
spection in all dormitories during the 
break. 

Enjoy your vacation! 



Dr. Prundeanu: DVC 

has Built Its Reputation 

on Agriculture 

Dear Editor, 

In order to make sure that there is no 
misunderstanding about my position re- 
garding dropping "Agriculture" from the 
college's name, I would appreciate it if 
you would print in-full my letter to the 
Campus Communicator. 

While 1 agree with many of the points 
Dr. Blumenfield makes in his article, I 
strongly disagree with dropping the name 
of Agriculture regarding the college or 
publications referring to the college. I 
would like to emphasize that in spite of a 
decrease in the number of students in 
Agriculture at our college, still over 50 
percent of our students are enrolled in 
Agriculture at the present time. More- 
over, our college has built Its reputa- 
tion as an Agricultural college, a 
reputation which goes far beyond the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Our 
graduates, be they Agronomy, Horticul- 
ture or any other Agriculture major, oc- 
cupy responsible positions in research, 
university teaching, in government and 
business, and are thought of as particu- 
larly well trained, comparing favorably 
with graduates of Rutgers, Penn State 
and other universities having colleges of 
Agriculture. 

(By the way, I have been associated 
with DVC only 30 years, not forty). 

This is the original letter sent to the 
Campus Communicator and published 
on November 24, 1986. 

Dr. Plummer's presentation at the last 
faculty meeting fulfilled, I hope, the pur- 
pose for which it was intended; namely 



to bring to the attention of the faculty, 
the tremendous importance of agriculture 
in our economy and especially as it re- 
lates to the overall employment in the 
United States and Pennsylvania. 

As far as the problem of declining en- 
rollment in Agriculture is concerned, this 
is not only a DVC problem. As it was 
pointed out, it is a national problem and, 
if anything, we are better off than most 
other colleges. We, in the colleges of 
Agriculture, are fighting not only demo- 
graphics, but are up against the most im- 
portant public opinion makers, the media 
in all its forms— newspapers, magazines, 
TV documentaries (especially "60 Min- 
utes") — which dramatize the crisis in 
American agriculture scaring away par- 
ents, high school counselors and pro- 
spective students who get their informa- 
tion (unfortunately) mainly from such 
sources. 

I would be the last to deny that not 
everything is all right with American agri- 
culture. However, the biggest problem, 
in my opinion, is that the public-at- large, 
and this includes the media, confuses the 
issue by equating farming with agricul- 
ture. Farming, important as it is — and I 
personally feel that it is very important in 
our overall economy and for our stan- 
dard of living — represents only a small 
fraction of employment for the graduates 
of an agricultural college. The real prob- 
lem we are facing — and it is not an easy 
one — is how to put our story across; 
namely, that in spite of what you read in 
the newspapers or in me magazines or 
hear and see on TV, there are plenty of 
good career opportunities out there for a 
college graduate in Agriculture. 

Sincerely, 
Julian Prundeanu 



LOCAL RESTAURANTEUR 
TO SPEAK 

Walter J. Conti, chairman of Conti 
Cross Keys Inn Inc., will speak on "Tech- 
nology: Tool for the Small Business," on 
Monday, March 2 at DVC. Conti will be 
the fourth in a series of presentations by 
the college's Faculty Lecture Series for 
1986-87 on Technology: Implications 
for the Future. 

In our service-oriented economy, 
technology can be a tool to enable a 
small business to provide better services, 
or it can be a barrier to the personalized 
service we want and expect. Having suc- 
cessfully built his own business, as well as 
serving on the governing boards of num- 
erous banks and universities, Conti is 
well-suited to address the issue. 

"The skills that I applied to my small- 
scale business, building it into a success- 
ful concern, can be transferced to large- 
scale operations, such as my involve- 
ment with Penn State, where the budget 
was $870 million," said Conti, who served 
the university as president of the board of 
trustees from 1983-1985. 

He has also been actively involved in 
numerous restaurant and hotel manage- 
ment organizations and institutions. 
Named Man of the Year in 1966 for the 
Penn State Hotel Society, Conti, a 1952 
graduate of Penn State in Hotel Admin- 
istration, has also been honored as Hos- 
pitality Executive of the Year 1982 by 
the Penn State Hotel and Restaurant 
Society, Pennsylvania's Outstanding 
Restaurant Operator of the Year 1982, 
Bucks County's Citizen Award for Distin- 
guished Service 1982 and the Interna- 
tional Foodservice Manufacturers Assn. 
1983 Silver and Gold Plate Award. 

Although he names his service on 
Penn State's Board of Trustees as his 
most rewarding experience, he has also 
been president of the Pennsylvania Res- 
taurant Assn., of the National Restaurant 
Assn. and a trustee of the Culinary In- 
stitute of America. 

Conti entered the restaurant business 
with his father, Frank, in 1951. Frank 



Conti retired in 1966. At present, his 
sons, Walter Jr. and Michael, serve as 
president and vice-president, respective- 
ly, of the corporation. 

The Faculty Lecture Series at DVC is 
open to the community at large at no 
charge. Mr. Conn's presentation will be 
held at 7:30 p.m. in the Student Center 
All-Purpose Room. 

The next presentation will be "Impact 
of Technology on U.S. Agricultural 
Policy," by Dr. Paul O'Connell, U.S. 
Department of Agriculture, on Wednes- 
day, April 8. 



Personal 



To "PAY BACK" the *8 and #9 "Train" 
is waiting to go over those "SNOW- 
CAPPED Mountains." Remember we've 
seen them and they are H-U-U-U-G-E. 
- "Big Boys" - PS. The time is 7:30, 
March 16. Bring the LIZARD. 

SPORTS WRAP-UP 

Sports Wrap-up is off this week. John 
Litzke assures us that his columns will 
resume next week (published Friday, 
March 6) . 

Beautiful Sounds 

On Thursday, February 12, the Music 
Room was filled with beautiful sounds of 
a harpist. The repertoire was a perfect 
balance between classical and folk music. 

STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Entertainment Editor Kevin Dickmyer 

Reporters Jerry L. Fritz and 

Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Zlemer 

See neum In the making? 
Write P.O. Box 9SS. 



— — ■ ■ 



Sunday 




Delaware Valley College 



1987 



MARCH 



1987 



Lenape Valley 
Chamber Ensemble 

3 - 5 p.m. • APR 



8 



Monday 



2 



Faculty Development 
Committee Lecture: 

"Technology: Tool for 
the Small Business" 

7:30 p.m. • APR 




15 



22 



EQUESTRIAN TEAM 

Hosted by University of 
Pennsylvania and Dickinson 

8 a.m. 



29 



EQUESTRIAN TEAM 

Hosted by Wilson College 
8 a.m. 




Top Gun 

9 p.m. • APR 

Spring Break ends 
at 8:30 a.m. 



23 




Tuesday 



3 



W *HON *H0 PQEMEj 

A 9teAK x>My> % k>. 
.-7M4TJ nHOk 




10 




St. Patrick's Day 




B/Ursinus/H/l p.m. 
(double header) 




Jagged Edge 

9 p.m. • APR 



31 



Clyde Peeling's 
Reptile Land 

7:30 p.m. • APR 

PRE REGISTRATION 

BEGINS 

SB/Upsala/H/2:30 p.m. 
B/Rutgers-Camden/H/3 p.m. 



Wednesday 



l\ Ash Wednesday 




Police Academy III 

9 p.m. • APR 



11 



Spring Break '87 



18 



Band and Chorale 
Classical Concert 

7:30 p.m. • APR 



25 



Randy Maugher 

(Singer performing at Caesar's) 
9 p.m. 

G/Kings/H/1 p.m. 
B/Swarthmore/A/3 p.m. 




Thursday 



5 



12 



19 



CAESAR'S PUB 

9 p.m. 



26 



DR. JAMES SIDIE 

Speaks on Honey Bee Biology 
8 p.m. • Mandel! 114 

SB/Wilkes/A/3 p.m. 



Friday 




6 




Spring Break - 
begins at 4 p.m. 



13 



■ 



20 



Junior 

Dinner Dance 

at Highpoint 

7 p.m. - 1 a.m. 




G/Swarthmore/H/1 p.m 



Saturday 




14 



BUCKS COUNTY 
SCIENCE FAIR 



21 



Innovation 

(Music Concert) 
9 a.m. - 1 a.m. • APR 



28 



Senior Dinner Dance 

at Highpoint 

Beekeeping 

Short Course Starts 

LAC/Trenton/H/2 p.m. 
B/Drew/H/1 p.m. (double header) 
T/Susquehanna/A 



B = Baseball 

SB ■ Softball 

LAC = Lacrosse 

T = Spring Track 

G = Golf 







IMjDRRraoira^MIkssf ©sflBcsfg© 



Vol. XXI, No. 20 
Friday. March 6, 1987 



. . . Take Some of 

the Summer Home 

with You . . . 




NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



SUN, FUN, AND A TASTE OF THE SHORE 

... Came to DVC Thursday, February 26 




and drove the winter doldrums away 



. . . 



Photo / Ram Pages 




Ray Boston, creator of the Summertime Any 
time Beach Party Photo / Ram Pages 









* 
* 



This Week on * 
Campus 

by W.L Unger 

FRIDAY. MARCH 6 

Spring Break! ENJOY! 

SATURDAY. MARCH 14 

Bucks County Science Fair 

MONDAY. MARCH 16 

Movie: "Top Gun" 
9 p.m. In the APR 

TUESDAY. MARCH 17 

St. Patrick's Day 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18 

Band and Chorale Classical Concert, 
7:30 p.m. in the APR 

THURSDAY. MARCH 19 

Caesar's Pub, 9 p.m. 

* * * * 



by Terry Sanderson 

Well, the beach party was a success. 
I'm glad everyone had fun. When there 
is a big event lots of work goes into it — 
more than anyone might realize — so 
with this article I'd like to thank some 
people. Thanks to Amy Clayton and 
Jerry Fritz who started the whole thing 
going by making calls and arrangements 
and to Michele who helped advertise this 
event. Thanks to all who helped during 
the party — you made it work. And spe- 
cial, special thanks to those die-hards 
who stayed up until 3:30 a.m. loading 



that last heavy crate — Amy, Jerry, Brian 
Taggart, Laura Etzweiler, Lori Luciano, 
Eric Vanden Berghe, Chris Farst, Kevin, 
Doug, and the student center worker 
(sorry I didn't know your name) . Clean- 
ing up isn't thrilling, but it has to be done 
and I'm glad you were there to help. 
You guys are greatly appreciated. 
Thanks also to Mr. Decker who made 
sure every mop, broom, and ice cream 
scoop was ready to go. When you see 
these people and anyone else who 
helped, give them a thank you. Their 
hard work made your evening great! 




Prtofo / Ram Pages 





Photo /Ram Pages 



Free ice cream looks mighty good when you re 
on the beach Photo Ram Pages 



ITS THE SAME OLD SONG 



Dear Editor, 

Here we are approaching another 
Spring at Delaware Valley College. I 
would cordially invite everyone to tour 
our campus and see The Snake River 
bed (between the Student Center and 
Work Hall), Pancho's All-Night Parking 
Lot (Ulman and Work), and the State 
Thruway (between Wolfsohn and Gold- 
man). Where are they . . .? Do we have 
these wonders . ..? The former was a 
description of the campus roads and 
roadsides. 

I want to use this time to address a very 
severe problem on this college campus, 
namely, vehicle traffic around dormitories, 
athletic events, the Student Center, and 
the damage that occurs. 

Despite the College rules and regula- 
tions, despite the number of traffic tickets 
issued and paid, people park and drive 
wherever they please. The result is a 
campus which appears to have no real 
pride in itself. There is no one person or 
party to blame for this damage; the Col- 
lege community as a whole is responsible. 
There are those who pull their vehicles 
off the road to watch a soccer or field 
hockey game; there are those who park 



their vehicles around the dorms for 15 
minutes or overnight; there are those 
who drive around these parked cars; 
there are those who simply drive on the 
grass. 

Currently we have so-called "fire 
lanes" around the buildings on this cam- 
pus. These lanes are the only means of 
access for all people to get to and from 
the buildings. Now let's face it, the road- 
ways cannot accommodate two-way 
traffic, parked cars or large vehicles. The 
result is tire ruts, broken road edges, pot 
holes, compacted soil, etc., all of which 
deface the appearance of the college in 
the eyes of the public, let alone in the 
eyes of ourselves. 

The following are some suggestions 
and solutions to the problem: 

1. Widen and curb certain roadways 
where two-way traffic is necessary. 

2. Put loading and unloading areas 
around dormitories for students and en- 
force a time limit. 

3. Restrict certain roadways for college 
vehicles only. 

4. Eliminate roadways and replace with 
smaller walkways. 



5. Make and enforce stricter rules and 
regulations. 

There are many more problems, solu- 
tions, and suggestions that can be dis- 
cussed about the College road system. I 
just feel that it is time that we research, 
design, and develop plans to correct the 
situation. The only way this can occur is 
if everyone cooperates with each other. 
You and I know that this will require a lot 
of time and money, but until this time 
comes, can everyone try to KEEP OFF 
THE GRASS? 

Timothy L. Varacallo 

This is a letter reprinted from the April 
1, 1985 issue which still applies, sad to 
say, in March 1987. May we add the 
Commuter Expressway between Bar- 
ness Hall and the Rudley -Neumann 
Gym? As far as we know, none of Tim's 
suggested improvements have been ini- 
tiated; Ram Pages insists that some sort 
of curbing system and path drainage 
design must be completed. This campus 
is a muddy mess and now the "paved" 
stone paths are worse than the grass. For 
the moment, we suggest that everyone 
take the paved roadways. 



ON THE TOWN 

A GUIDE TO WHATS HAPPENING IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 



Annual Beekeeper's 
Meeting Set 



by Kevin Dickmyer 

Leapin' Lizards and Leprechauns 

Tap your toes to some lively Irish music, 
and let a leprechaun paint a shamrock 
on your cheek at the Philadelphia Zoo- 
WMGK St. Patrick's Day Party at the 
Zoo on Sunday, March 15 from noon to 
4 p.m. 

Entrants in the Animal Song Contest 
on WMGK will be eligible to win the Zoo's 
trip to Ireland, compliments of Aer Lingus 
and CLE. Tours International. The 
drawing will be held at 3:30 the day of 
the party. 



All partygoers will receive a coupon 
good for a free shamrock-shaped soft 
pretzel, compliments of J & J Snack Food 
Corporation, to munch on while they 
stroll the grounds. 

Visitors will want to stop by the World 
of Primates to see our new baby gibbon 
and marmosets and drop in on Patrick, 
the baby tapir, in the Pachyderm House. 
A few honorary Irish animals — the em- 
erald tree boa and the green tree python 
— will be on hand in the Reptile House, 
too. 

Everyone's greening up for the fun on 
the 15th, so plan to be there. 




THE GREEN SCENE 
ATDVC 



by Jerry Fritz 

The Landscape Nursery Club 

The Landscape Nursery Club recently 
went on two field trips to local businesses. 
Our first trip was to Carter Van Dyke, a 
landscape architect firm in Doylestown. 
The club members were informed of the 
type of work performed in a typical land- 
scape architect firm. 

Our second field trip was to Gale 
Nurseries in Gwynedd, Pa. Chuck Gale 
'71, gave us a tour showing his facilities 
and talking mainly about the 1987 Phila- 
delphia Flower Show. Gale Nurseries 
has been affiliated with the Flower Show 
for many years, winning, various top 
garden awards. The club received a 
"behind the scene" look at the manicured 
plant material being forced for their gar- 
den exhibit. 

The club will be going on more field 
trips this semester. I strongly suggest at- 
tending these enjoyable and educational 
field trips. 

The Landscape Nursery Club and the 
Floral Society will be co-sponsoring a 
garden trip to Duke Gardens in Somer- 
ville, N.J. The date is tentatively set for 
March 21 (Saturday) morning. More in- 
formation will be available soon. 

The Flower Show 
Is Here Now! 

The Philadelphia Flower Show will be 
held on March 8th to March 15th. The 
Ornamental Horticulture department will 
be setting up the week prior to the grand 
opening. If you have any time to help it 
would be greatly appreciated. 

Just a tip for visiting the flower show: 
don't go on a Saturday or Sunday be- 
cause the crowds are at their peak; Thurs- 
day and Friday are the best days to visit. 
Tickets for the show are available from 
the Lasker Hall receptionist. 

STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 
Entertainment Editor . Kevin Dickmyer 

Reporters Jerry L. Fritz, 

Connie Hajioannou, 
Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news In the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 



A-DAY NEWS 

Rules and regulations for the 1987 
A- Day Flower Show are now available at 
the following locations: 

1. The main O.H. Department Office 
(Dr. Martin's office) at the greenhouse. 

2. Any O.H. faculty office. 

3. The Library — Main Desk 

4. Joan Comly — Berkowitz 222. 
Any student in any major, full or part 

time, can compete. Deadline for entries 
is Friday, April 3rd, 1987. Get a set of 
rules and regulations with attached entry 
form and enter today! Be a part of one of 
the finest student flower shows in the 
universe! 



MONEY-FOR-COLLEGE 

by Irving Bender 

Q. "My son is a graduating HS senior 
who has been accepted to college. He is 
an honor student. Although he is visually 
disabled he participates in activities along 
with other students who are not visually 
disabled. We have applied for financial 
help and so far have not been successful." 

J.B.M.,Pa. 
A. Your son is eligible for private source 
awards based on factors in your back- 
ground including field of study, career 
goal — and many more. 

Here is a private source award you are 
eligible for based on his visual disability: 
GORE FAMILY MEMORIAL FOUN- 
DATION TRUST (Scholarships for Handi- 
capped), 230 S.E. First Ave., Ft. Lauder- 
dale, FL 33301 Award Amount: Depen- 
dent on need. Deadline: None All areas 
of study. Awards renewable if student 
maintains aC+ average. 

How can you know all you are eligible 
for? This is an enormous chore because 
there are so many independent sources. 
You can tap the world's largest compu- 
terized database of private award sources: 
over 200,000 listings covering UNDER- 
GRADUATE, GRADUATE, and OVER- 
SEAS study. For free details, write: Fi- 
nancial Aid Finders, 77 Gristmill Rd., 
Randolph, NJ 07869. Or call TOLL- 
FREE 800-992-0424 (from N.J. call: 
201-361-2567). 




Anyone Interested in 
Reinstating the Scuba Club? 

Please contact James Connors via the 
commuter mailbox or 340-1267 or Mr. 
Johnson of the Biology Department. 

This is open to non -certified as well as 
certified scuba enthusiasts! 



The annual joint meeting of the Bucks 
County and Montgomery County Bee- 
keepers' Association has been set for 
Thursday, March 26, 1987 at 8 p.m. in 
Mandell Hall (114) Auditorium. 

The program is sponsored by DVC in 
conjunction with the Bucks County Bee- 
keepers' Association and the College 
Apiary Society. Featured speaker for the 
evening will be Dr. James Sidie, Associate 
Professor of Biology at Ursinus College, 
College ville, Pa. 

Dr. Sidie's illustrated talk "The Biology 
of the Honey Bee" will be based on his 



many years of research with this insect. 
Dr. Sidie earned his Ph.D. at Notre Dame 
University as a student under Dr. Harold 
Esch. Dr. Esch in turn was a student of 
Nobel Prize winner Dr. Karl von Frisch. 
Sidie's degree study dealt with the varia- 
bility in the sound signals of the honeybee 
waggle dance. 

The meeting is open to the public, and 
there is no admission fee. It should prove 
interesting not only to those interested in 
the honeybee, but also to those with an 
interest in biology and its various physical 
and chemical aspects. 



Beekeeping Short 
Course Offered 



Delaware Valley College will again be 
offering its popular three-day beekeeping 
short course on the following three Satur- 
days. March 28, April 4, and April 11. 
The course is under the direction of Dr. 
Robert Berthold, the College's beekeep- 
ing specialist. He will be assisted by Jack 
Matthenius, New Jersey State Supervisor 
of Bee Culture. 



The course is designed to benefit any- 
one who might be interested in beekeep- 
ing, from those who are just interested in 
learning more about these insects, to 
long-time experienced beekeepers. 

The class runs from 8:30 a.m. -4 p.m. 
The fee for the course is $35.00. Addi- 
tional information about the course can 
be obtained by writing or calling Dr. Bert- 
hold, Mandell 205. 



LAW AND DISORDER 



by Margaret Freeman 

History provides much of the trivia for 
the games we play. Sometimes we play 
with rules and regulations which appear 
to be only trivial. Anyway, rules and 
history make a good combination for a 
funny laugh or heartfelt cry. 

"How is this so?" you ask. Well, a few 
years ago in the eating business (now 
known as the food industry) people had 
to know the rules in order to play, or 
rather serve. 

Well, what would you do if you had to 
follow these "eating standards" from the 
past — would you laugh or cry? 

Food processor have to work within 
some strange laws. For instance: 

In Massachusetts it is illegal to eat pea 
nuts in church or use tomatoes in clam 
chowder. 

It is illegal to sell milk by the glass in 
San Francisco. 

It is illegal to ride a street car or attend 
a theater within four hours of eating garlic 
in Gary, Indiana. 

In Wisconsin it is compulsory for all 
boarding houses, clubs, hotels and res- 
taurants to serve free at least two-thirds 
of an ounce of cheese with every meal 
over 25 cents. 



It is illegal in Riverside, California, to 
carry a lunch bucket on the street. 

In Nebraska it is illegal for tavern 
operators to sell beer unltss they simul- 
taneously are cooking soup. 

Restaurant operators in Brimingham, 
Alabama, are forbidden to use a broom 
to clean their floors. 

In Connecticut it is illegal to sell pickles 
that collapse in their own juice when 
dropped 12 inches; they must stay whole 
and bounce. 

In Waterloo, Nebraska, barbers are for- 
bidden to eat onions between 7a.m. and 
7 p.m. 

In Hammond, Indiana, it is illegal for 
watermelon -eaters to throw seeds on the 
sidewalk. 

In Houston, Texas, it is illegal to sell 
rye bread, goose liver or limburger cheese 
on Sunday, and it is illegal for customers 
to remove the items they cannot buy 
from the store. 

In Corvallis, Oregon, it is illegal for' 
young women to drink coffee after 6 p.m. 

In Memphis, Tennessee, if a restau- 
rant customer doesn't eat his pie it must 
be destroyed in his presence, and he 
cannot be served bologna on Sunday. 



SPRING BREAK TEASER 




Photo / Ram Pages 




SPORTS' BRIEFS 87 



by John Litzke 

• SMU football program hits major set 
back. Convicted of payments to 
players, SMU banned from college 
football in '87, limited to seven SW 
Conference games in '88, all on the 
road, no non-conference games and 
no TV or bowl participation in '88. 

• Michael Spinks stripped of Internation- 
al Boxing Federation title for refusing 
to fight to challenger Tony Tucker. 

• Phoenix Suns coach John MacLeod 
fired as head coach after 14 years. 
Dick Van Arsdale replaces him. 

• Former Pittsburgh Steeler defensive 
great mean Joe Greene joins Pitts- 
burgh's coaching staff to coach defen- 
sive line. 

• With spring training underway; here's 
some bits and pieces from around the 
grapefruit and cactus leagues: 

• Oakland As announced the retirement 
of pitcher Vida Blue. 

• New York Yankees sign free-agent 
Ron Kittle from Chicago and Pat Cle- 
ments, pitcher. 

• Phils sign shortstop Steve Jeltz, catchers 
Joe Cipplloni and John Russell, out- 
fielder Chris James, and invite old 
friend? Steve Carlton back as a non- 
roster pitcher. Lance Parrish breaks 
contract talks due to a no-sue clause in 
the contract so Parrish remains in lim- 
bo. Where will he go now? It is my feel- 
ing that the Phils still have a minimal 
opportunity to get him. We'll soon see. 

• Mets' pitcher Ron Darling wins his ar- 
bitration case and will earn $1.05 mil- 
lion/year. 

• After four straight losses, Sixers fall into 
third place behind Washington and re- 
main in sixth place overall out of the 
eight eastern teams vying for playoff 
spots. Boston, Detroit, Chicago, 
Washington, Milwaukee. Atlanta, In- 
diana are other seven in the east. 

• Philadelphia public league quarterfi- 
nals that took place Tuesday will pit: 
Strawberry Mansion at Franklin Gratz 
at Southern Dobbins at Frankford West 
Philadelphia at Parkway. 

• Penn overcomes Yale to capture Ivy 
League title; LaSalle ousted in MAAC 
Tourney by Fairfield despite 36 from 
Lionel Simmons. By the way, Lionel 
was named to the NCAA All-Rookie 
Team according to NBC. 

• Flyers remain well ahead of Patrick 
Division foes battling with Edmonton 
for most points. Edmonton currently 
with 81, Flyers with 79. Flyers' goalie, 
Ron Hextall and Los Angeles forward, 
Luc Robitaille tie 10-10 in voting for 
Calder Trophey honoring best rookie. 

• Sunday March 1 marks the anniver- 
sary of Wilt Chamberlain's 100 point 
performance. 

• March madness is upon us with tourna- 
ment time and the 64 team NCAA 
basketball championship tournament 
field will be chosen Saturday. 




FINAL 
Intramural Standings 

by John Litkze 



GREEN 


W 


L 


% 


Running Rebels 
Psychotic Hoop 
EMO 


6 
3 
3 



1 
3 


1.000 
.750 
.500 


Gargoyles 
Wolfpack 

Bambino Magicians 
Space Between 


2 
2 
2 




3 
3 
4 
5 


.400 
.400 
.333 
.000 


GOLD 


w 


L 


% 


Double Stuff 


6 





1.000 


Terps 

Blue Demons 


5 
3 


1 
2 


.833 
.600 


Running Rabbi's 
Boffers 


3 

1 


4 
4 


428 
.200 


Agbolt 





5 


.000 



NOTICE: Complete coverage, in- 
cluding boxscores, leaders, and cham- 
pionship coverage will return after the 
break, so be sure to pick up your Ram 
Pages. 

DVC Women 

Finish at 7-16; 

Fifi Honored 

by John Litzke 

The 1986-87 season has ended for 
the Lady Aggies a bit on the down side 
as far as the record goes, but the outlook 
for the 1987-88 season looks very prom- 
ising as only one senior graduates. DVC 
finished in fourth place behind FDU, 
Kings, and Scranton with a record of 
7-16 overall and 4-6 in the MAC and if 
anything was gained this season, it was 
valuable experience and basketball 
maturity. 

In her final game, senior Darcel Estep 
was honored in an emotional goodbye 
with a bouquet of roses and the works. 
Fifi contributed to the DVC victory over 
Drew with 14 points and was honored 
the previous week as MAC player of the 
week averaging 19 points, (in games 
against Kings, FDU, and Lycoming) 
handing out 18 assists, grabbed 21 re- 
bounds and made six steals. Many con- 
gratulations to you Fifi; you've made a 
significant impact on DVC basketball and 
we here at DVC wish you all the best and 
I would personally like to thank you for 
all your cooperation and loyalty. 

And now, here is a final summary of 
the last five games of the season . 

AT DVC, 2/9: Behind Kathy Walsh 
(20), Patty Thomas (16), and Kim Rat- 
diko (12) the Lady Monarchs took a 
31-24 halftime lead and would never 
look back enroute to their 70-55 victory 
over DVC . The Lady Aggies were led by 
freshman and star of the future, Laura 
Rotz with 18 and Fifi added 14 dropping 
DVC to (5-13). 

AT DVC, 2/11: The Lady Devils 
visited from their den up in Madison, NJ 
and Fifi. Petraskie, Shirk, and the crew 
were out to extinguish the Devils' flame. 
In one of DVC's strongest games of the 
season, the Ladies fell behind by a four 
spot at the half 36-32 led by Fifi and 
Petraskie with eight apiece. FDU was 
paced at the half by Wendy Waters with 
14 and Mary Clair Boyle with nine. DVC 
was storming at the end of halftime when 
they tied it early in the half on a basket by 
Tammy and took the lead 38-36 on a 
bucket by Fifi at 18:30. It was back and 
forth up until the final buzzer. DVC was 
up 77-76 after two fouls by Fifi with :17 
and a win seemed eminent but the ball 
was worked into high scoring center 

continued on page 4 



%/|iA<2-UP 



WOMEN'S FINAL BASKETBALL STANDINGS 






LEAGUE 


OVERALL 


POINTS 


Southern Division 


- WEST W 


L 


PCT 


w 


L 


PCT 


F 


A 


Franklin & Marshall 


8 


2 


.800 


20 


4 


.833 


1608 


1388 


Western Maryland 


7 


3 


.700 


16 


6 


.727 


1485 


1332 


Dickinson 


6 


4 


.600 


14 


8 


.636 


1514 


1376 


Lebanon Valley 


5 


5 


.500 


11 


14 


.440 


1637 


1676 


Gettysburg 


4 


6 


.400 


7 


12 


.368 


1208 


1293 


John Hopkins 





10 


.000 


4 


15 


211 


1032 


1289 


Southern Division 


- EAST 
















Moravian 


12 





1.000 


20 


5 


800 


1828 


1499 


Mulhenberg 


10 


2 


.833 


14 


8 


.636 


1479 


1294 


Swarthmore 


6 


6 


.500 


11 


11 


500 


1292 


1290 


Ursinus 


6 


6 


.500 


6 


15 


.286 


1209 


1315 


Albright 


4 


8 


.333 


6 


13 


.316 


1130 


1243 


Widener 


4 


8 


.333 


7 


16 


.304 


1248 


1463 


Haverford 





12 


000 


7 


14 


.333 


1018 


1286 


Northern Division 


- WEST 
















Elizabethtown 


10 





1.000 


23 


1 


958 


1803 


1374 


Susquehanna 


8 


2 


.800 


13 


6 


b84 


1315 


1185 


Messiah 


4 


6 


400 


9 


12 


429 


1310 


1317 


Wilkes 


4 


6 


400 


9 


13 


409 


1394 


1418 


Juniata 


3 


7 


300 


5 


13 


.278 


965 


1234 


Lycoming 


1 


9 


100 


5 


16 


238 


1253 


1399 


Northern Division 


- EAST 
















Scranton 


10 





1.000 


41 


1 


.960 


1841 


1216 


Kings 


8 


2 


.800 


16 


9 


.640 


1723 


1496 


FDU-Madison 


5 


5 


.500 


13 


11 


524 


1684 


1461 


Delaware Valley 


4 


6 


.400 


7 


16 


.304 


1540 


1566 


Drew 


2 


8 


.200 


4 


15 


.211 


938 


1210 


Upsala 





10 


000 


6 


20 


.231 


1215 


1782 



DVC WOMEN'S BASKETBALL FINAL STATISTICS 

23 GAMES 



NAME 

Darcdl Estep 
Michelle Shirk 
Tammy Petraskie 
Laura Rotz 
Etta Smith 
Lisa Long 
Stacy Yoder 
Rhonda Hill 
Pat Dollarton 
Sharon Chapman 
Vicky Blazjewski 

TOTALS 



G FG FGA PCT F FTA PCT PTS AVG A S REB AVG 



23 163 

23 125 

23 124 

23 101 



23 
23 
23 
22 

7 

4 

15 



58 

33 

36 

16 

2 

2 

1 



376 43% 

242 52% 

251 49% 

231 44% 

122 48% 

94 35% 

77 47% 

46 35% 

11 18% 

3 67% 

10 10% 



31 

51 

40 

8 

19 

47 

8 

6 

4 



5 



39 79% 

71 72% 

70 57% 

17 47% 

33 58% 

67 70% 

15 53% 

11 55% 

8 36% 

1 0% 

10 50% 



357 

301 

288 

210 

135 

113 

80 

36 

8 

4 

7 



155 

13 1 

125 

9 1 

59 

49 

3.5 

1 7 

1 1 

1 

5 



110 

24 

22 

72 

86 

lb 

17 

11 

4 

1 

1 



44 

59 

27 

47 

57 

26 

14 

4 

3 



2 



145 

193 

180 

68 

37 

63 

31 

29 

7 

2 

16 



4.7 
84 
78 
3 



23 660 1453 45% 214 332 b4% 15.34 66.7 363 281 755 32 8 



OVERALL RECORD 8-15. MAC NORTHEAST: 4-6 



SCORES TO DATE 



DVC 81, Mt. St. Vincent 56 
Gallaudet 79. DVC 71 
DVC 94. Upsala 46 
DVC 73. Drew 41 
Moravian 78. DVC 65 
Scranton 98. DVC 49 
Albright 70. DVC 66 
Wilkes 88. DVC 60 
DVC 72. Misericordia 63 
Cabrini 67. DVC 61 
Allentown 61, DVC 43 
Kings 68. DVC 62 



Lebanon Valley 65. DVC 63 
DVC 67. St. Eluabeth 65 
Widener 65. DVC 57 
FDU-Madison 79. DVC 74 
Spring Garden 89. DVC 77 
Scranton 71. DVC 54 
Kings 70. DVC 55 
FDU-Madison 78. DVC 77 
Lycoming 75. DVC 74 
DVC 70. Upsala 48 
DVC 77. Drew 4b 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 



INDIVIDUAL SCORING 



FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 



Name 


G 


Pt». 


Avg. 


Name 


G Made 


Art 


PCT 


Stephanie Carson, Ups. 


10 


204 


20.4 


Una Espenkotter, Scr. 


14 


77 


136 


.566 


Lisa Adams, Mor 


22 


436 


19.8 


Elaine Balaban, E-town 


18 


119 


213 


.559 


Anne Searles, Muhl 


21 


412 


19.6 


Andrea Heinz, Sus. 


16 


66 


119 


.555 


Pam Pierce, Swarth. 


14 


275 


19.6 


Delorus Giachetti, D-son 


17 


135 


244 


553 


Cindy Boyer, W. Md 


14 


269 


19.2 


Cindy Boyer, W. Md 


14 


119 


219 


.543 


Darcel Estep, DV 


10 


188 


18.8 


Ann Cessna, LV 


14 


83 


158 


5 25 


Kay Czap, Sus. 


16 


299 


18.7 


Cathy Belser, F&M 


19 


121 


231 


.523 


Delorus Giachetti, D-son 


17 


309 


18.2 


Sue Baldwin, O-son 


17 


110 


212 


.519 


Elaine Balaban, E-town 


18 


293 


16.3 


Bobbie Sue Copley, Urs. 


8 


29 


56 


.518 


Shelly Parks, Scr. 


16 


258 


16.1 


Michelle Swanther, E-town 


18 


108 


197 


.513 


INDIVIDUAL REBOUNDING 




FREE THROW PERCENTAGE 




Name 


G 


Pto. 


Avg. 


Name 


GMade 


Att 


PCT 


Susan Grubb, Jun. 


15 


202 


13.4 


Cathy Belsor. F&M 


19 


55 


62 


.887 


Alison Koch, Alb. 


19 


218 


11.5 


Michelle Swanther, E-town 


18 


38 


46 


826 


Anne Krumrine, F&M 


19 


217 


11.4 


Tracy Herb, Muhl. 


21 


66 


80 


.825 


Stephanie Carson, Ups 


10 


112 


11.2 


Wendy Novak, Mor. 


22 


37 


45 


.822 


Sonya Chruch, D-son 


17 


188 


11.1 


Elaine Balaban, E-town 


18 


55 


68 


809 


Cindy Greene, Mor. 


22 


239 


10.9 


Kay Czap, Sus. 


16 


73 


91 


802 


Cindy Boyer. W. Md. 


14 


150 


10.7 


Ann Cessna, LV 


14 


26 


34 


765 


Anne Searles, Muhl. 


21 


218 


10.4 


Jennifer Truscott, Swarth. 


12 


26 


34 


760 


Patti Thomas, King 


17 


168 


9.8 


Trine Geiser, E-town 


18 


41 


54 


759 


Barb Mann, Alb. 


19 


180 


9.5 


Wendy Tretheway, Mor 


22 


53 


70 


.757 



by John Litzke 

With but :09 seconds left, the clock 
running, John Paul Andrejko, a 6-7 
senior put away what was thought to be 
the winning basket that gave Scranton 
the 61-59 lead. Junior guard Eric Ford, 
with a burst of speed, received the in- 
bounds pass, bolted up court, found 
open highway and put in the tying layup 
and was fouled!!! What excitement. Eric 
was shooting for the win. He approached 
the line with over 2000 screaming idiots 
trying to make him flub, but it wasn't to 
be as the free-throw hit nothing but net to 
give DVC the royal shocking, upset vic- 
tory 62-61. 

With the overtime loss to Scranton still 
in the back of their minds, the 10-9 Ag- 
gies set out with a purpose to show the 
residents of Scranton that DVC was not 
a fluke. 

DVC held close at the half trailing by a 
deuce at 31-29 led by sophomores Joe 
Cherry with nine and Dwight Weldon 
with six. As a team DVC hit 14 of 30 from 
the field for 49%. Displaying the fine 
talent that's going to make DVC a power 
to be reckoned with, Joe Cherry poured 
home a season and team high 21 points 
along with five rebounds and three assists. 

Andrejko led the Royals with 15 while 
Shawn Gallagher and Eric Jacobs added 



FORD, CHERRY SHOCK SCRANTON; 
VICTORIOUS OVER DREW IN FINALE 



12 apiece. The loss did nothing to dim 
the playoff hopes of Scranton dropping 
them to 14-5, 8-3 but it did serve as a 
tremendous confidence builder for the 
future of this DVC team and for the 50 
or so DVC maniacs who attended, it 
served as a game winning rush onto the 
court and a helluva ride home. 

VS. LYCOMING, 2/18: Balanced 
scoring up and down the DVC lineup did 
a fiesty Lycoming Warrior team 90-88 
before a packed house at James Work 
Gym. At 13-10, 8-6 DVC was looking to 
end the season on an up note, and that 
is exactly what happened on the next to 
last game of the '86-'87 season. 

Joe Butts, the 6-1 guard from Over- 
brook H.S. in Philly, was one of the big 
guns for DVC as he "so kindly" distributed 
22 points, 10 assists and three rebounds 
into the Warriors flank. Mike Sutrynowicz, 
the freshman from Wissahickon, jumped 
on the band wagon and poured home 
17 big points to assert himself as the 
other big gun of the night. Other double 
figures for DVC included Weldon with 11, 
Boone with 13 and Cherry with 10. 

One highlight that needs to be men- 
tioned is the job DVC did on the foul line. 
The Aggies did their best work of the 
season from the line going there 32 times 



and missing only five and that would 
prove to be the difference. 

Lycoming (9-12, 7-7) was led by Jay 
Cleveland with a game high 27, Jeff 
Jones with 19 and Ron Heiler with 15. 



Wissahickon Connection 
Sends Rangers 
Back to Woods 

VS. DREW, 2/21: "Uh oh Yogi, it's 
Mr. Ranger." Behind the high scoring of 
Dwight Weldon and Mike Sutrynowicz, 
both residents of the Wissahickon area 
and both accumulating 21 points to lead 
all scorers, DVC eeked out a 72-70 win 
in the last game of the season for both 
teams. 

DVC took the opening tap and ran up 
a 10-3 lead early on only to have Drew 
snatch it right away at the 17:56 and lead 
by as much as five at 22-17. DVC grabbed 
the lead back at 29-24 on two free throws 
by sophomore forward Joe Cherry at the 
7:07. Drew had come back to make it a 
game just when DVC thought they would 
enter the locker room at halftime with a 
lead. With DVC up 38-36 and time run- 
ning out in the half, Drew tied it on a lay 
in by senior center Ken Famcker and took 



the lead on a two-point buzzer beater by 
junior guard Mackey Pendergrast to give 
the Rangers the lead at the half 40-38. 

In that first half, Sutrynowicz led all 
scorers with 13 and Dwight added nine 
while senior Scott Ellsworth and senior 
Bill Dunn had eight apiece for Drew. A 
milestone was reached by Dunn in the 
first half as, with 2:42 remaining, he 
scored his 1,449th point of his career to 
set the all-time Drew scoring record. 

Powered by guard Joe Butts (15) and 
Sutrynowicz, DVC took a commanding 
52-44 lead at the 14:13 mark and they'd 
never look back. To fuel the fire even 
more, outstanding sophomore Dwight 
Weldon went on a 10-0 run of his own 
which gave DVC the lead at that point 
64-58. A three-point play by Farricker 
made it close at the end. 

DVC finishes the 1986-87 season with 
some pretty impressive numbers. Not 
since 1970 has DVC seen a winning sea- 
son but this year at 14-10 DVC has 
broken the jinx, so to speak, and the pro- 
spectus for next season looks fantastic 
with everyone returning. Congratula- 
tions to Head Coach Bill Werkiser, assis- 
tants Jim Welch and Mark Werkiser, and 
the entire team on a fine season. 

Drew finishes their season on the down 
side at (9 13, 7-8). 



MENS FINAL BASKETBALL STANDINGS 

LEAGUE OVERALL POINTS 



Southern Division - WEST 


W 


L 


PCT 


W 


L 


PCT 


F 


A 


Franklin & Marshal! 


10 


2 


.833 


20 


5 


.800 


1850 


1618 


Gettysburg 


8 


4 


.667 


13 


12 


.520 


1899 


1926 


Dickinson 


7 


5 


.583 


13 


12 


.520 


1796 


1704 


Muhlenberg 


6 


6 


.500 


11 


13 


.458 


1692 


1752 


Moravian 


5 


7 


.417 


11 


13 


.458 


1748 


1674 


Western Maryland 


4 


8 


.333 


10 


14 


.417 


1617 


1781 


Lebanon Valley 


2 


10 


.167 


8 


16 


.333 


1839 


1994 


Southern Division — EAST 


















Widener 


10 





1.000 


22 


33 


.880 


1695 


1223 


Washington 


7 


3 


.700 


16 


7 


.696 


1847 


1632 


Ursinus 


7 


3 


.700 


12 


13 


.480 


1804 


1768 


Swarthmore 


3 


7 


.300 


5 


18 


.217 


1358 


1655 


Johns Hopkins 


2 


8 


.200 


6 


17 


.261 


1522 


1667 


Haverford 


1 


9 


.100 


7 


18 


.280 


1448 


1850 


Northern Division - WEST 


















Albright 


10 


6 


.625 


12 


13 


.480 


1689 


1657 


Elizabethtown 


10 


6 


.625 


15 


10 


.600 


1879 


1831 


Susquehanna 


8 


8 


.500 


10 


15 


.400 


1579 


1748 


Lycoming 


7 


9 


.438 


9 


14 


.391 


1519 


1893 


Juniata 


4 


12 


.250 


7 


18 


.280 


1705 


1811 


Messiah 


1 


15 


.063 


3 


22 


.120 


1769 


1902 


Northern Division - EAST 












- 






Kings 


13 


3 


.813 


20 


4 


.833 


1885 


1659 


Scranton 


12 


4 


.750 


19 


6 


.760 


1849 


1675 


Wilkes 


10 


6 


.625 


14 


8 


.636 


1714 


1683 


Delaware Valley 


10 


6 


.625 


14 


10 


.583 


1770 


1717 


FDU-Madison 


7 


9 


438 


11 


13 


.458 


1679 


1662 


Drew 


4 


12 


250 


9 


17 


.346 


1707 


1788 


NORTH 










SOUTH 






Elizabethtown over Kings 








Widener over Gettysburg 




Scranton over Albright 








F&M over Washington 




FINAL 










FINAL 






Scranton over Elizabethtown 






Widenei 


■ over F&M 





Women's Basketball 

continued from page 3 

Mary Clair Boyle who hit the game win- 
ner, at the buzzer, to foil DVC 78-77. 
DVC was paced by fine performances 
from Darcel Estep with 22, Tammy Pe- 
traskie with 21, and freshman Michele 
Shirk with 18. For the winners, Wendy 
Waters finished with 23 and Boyle added 
21 to put FDU at 13-7 and drop DVC to 
5-14. 

AT LYCOMING, 2/14: Not even 
the American Heart Association can cure 
the amount of heartbreakers DVC has 
suffered this season. At Lycoming vs. the 
Lady Warriors, four DVC ladies finished 
in double figures (Rotz 20, Estep 16, 
Long 11, and Petraskie 10) but it wasn't 



enough as Lycoming got beneficial point 
production from Ramm with 25, Zook 
with 15, and Fitzgerald with 12 as the 
Warriors downed DVC 75-74. 

AT UPSALA, 2/16: It was a thorough 
pounding and Coach Pento and the 
Ladies loved every minute of it. Estep 
finished with 18, Shirk with 13, Yoder 
with nine, and Smith with seven enroute 
to the 70-48 polishing off of Upsala. Car- 
son was the lone bright spot for Upsala 
with 28. 

Congratulations to Smith, Petraskie, 
Yoder, Shirk, Rotz, Blazejewski, Long, 
and Hill for all your hard work and the 
excitement of your college basketball 
season. Hope you will all be returning 
next season. 



Sports Trivia '87 

Congratulations to Ray Darbenzio on 
being chosen from seven entries as the 
winner of this past week's trivia question 
which was: In 1979, two state schools 
appeared in the NCAA Final. Name the 
two schools and the two NBA superstars 
who came from each school. 

Sports Trivia '87 will return after 
break. Remember, you can't win if you 
don't play. 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 

INTERVIEWS FOR THE 

WEEK OF MARCH 16 

Wednesday, March 18 

USDA 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

FIRST INVESTORS 
Group interview 
11:20 a.m. -12:10 p.m. 

Thursday, March 19 

MARRAZZO'S MANOR LANE 
LANDSCAPE & NURSERY 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Friday, March 20 

CROP MANAGEMENT 

STRATEGIES. INC. 

Individual interviews, 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 




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Vol. XXI, No. 21 
Friday. March 20, 1987 




Highlights 

Dear Editor 2 

On the Town 3 

Scholarships 2 

Sports Wrap Up 4 



NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



Board Announces Next President 

President-Elect Called "Both Educator and Businessman' 



by Bill Rein 

In a memo to the college community 
March 9, Dr. Joshua Feldstein announced 
that the Board of Trustees accepted the 
recommendations of the Presidential 
Search Committee and Executive Com- 
mittee, unanimously electing William H. 
Rorer, III, as president of Delaware 
Valley College effective July 1. 1987. 

William H. Rorer. HI has resigned his 
position as senior vice president of Rorer 
Group, Inc. of Fort Washington effective 
May 1 . The 50-year-old Lumberville resi- 
dent has been a corporate director of the 
pharmaceutical company, which bears 
his family name, for 25 years. William H. 
Rorer Company was started locally, in 
Hatboro, prior to the Civil War, and be- 
came incorporated in 1910. Now a multi- 
million dollar corporation, Rorer Group 
develops, manufacturers, and markets 
prescription and over-the-counter pharma- 
ceuticals worldwide. 

According to a news release from the 
college's Public Information Office. Mr. 
Rorer will work closely with current presi- 
dent Dr. Feldstein for a period of training 
before assuming the presidency of DVC 
after Dr. Feldstein's retirement June 30 

Though he does not yet have any defi- 
nite plans of improvement, Mr. Rorer 




William H Rorer. III. will become DVC's next president July 1. 1987 



Photo/DVC Public Info 



has set some basic priorities, according to 
an article in the March 10 edition of The 
Daily Intelligencer. One priority is to 
reduce the percentage of the school's 
operating budget relying on tuition, 
room and board fees, by increasing fund 
raising. Currently, these fees make up 80 
percent of DVC's 11 million operating 
budget, Dr. Feldstein said. Other priori- 
ties Mr. Rorer has set include increasing 
enrollment; "I want to see the college 
grow and become a more dominant force 
in the community" Rorer told the 
Intelligencer. 

Dr. Feldstein noted that he considered 
the president-elect "both a businessman 
and an educator" because of his back- 
ground as a Navy Officer (1958-63) and 
his experience as husband and father of 
three . Our current president also stressed 
that "A college is not just an educational 
institution; it is a business with a multi- 
million dollar budget . . . Just because 
someone has a Ph.D. does not mean he 
will make a good college president." 
However, the decision to elect a business- 
man president does not indicate a shift in 
the college's curriculum. Dr. Feldstein 
says the college will continue to empha- 
size agriculture. 



by Ann Whitesell 

Have you seen the quiet- mannered 
woman on campus who claims "if you 
can talk, you can sing."? Mrs. JoAnn 
Roberts, teacher of Music and Chorale 
Director for Delaware Valley College 
best fits the description. I spoke with Mrs. 
Roberts to find out what's planned for 
the spring singing season and to ask why 
Chorale is such a popular club. 

RP: What do you find interesting in 
DVC? 

"The students I am involved with want to 
continue a music or art education in their 
spare time, and yet are science-oriented 
in their formal education. They hold a 
very busy schedule, yet are dedicated to 
anything they pursue." 



Mrs. Roberts Makes DVC a Classic in Song 



RP: Do you ever get bored or into a 
rut? 

"No. Every semester 1 meet new students. 
We try new pieces to sing, but most im- 
portant I get to see the students grow and 
mature." 

RP: You speak so highly about teach- 
ing music, obviously. Where did you get 
your education in music. How long have 
you been teaching at DVC? 
"I received my bachelor's degree from 
Lebanon Valley and a Master's in Art 
from Trenton State. I also studied at Tem- 
ple and Colorado Universities." 

"I've been teaching at Delaware Valley 
College since 1971, taking over the Chor- 
ale at that time also." 



RP: I've heard that you can teach any- 
one to sing. I've heard your motto, "If 
you can talk, you can sing." How true is 
that? 

"I truly believe anyone can sing, but the 
level that one achieves might not be per- 
ceived as the best by the singer. The 
longer a person practices anything, the 
better he becomes — and this includes 
singing." 

RP: So, what's going on with the 
Chorale this spring? 

"We are having our Classical Concert, 
March 18." 

RP: Define the term "classical." 
"Any music or thing that has been given 
the test of time. This includes instrumental 



or vocal music." 

RP: Anything else? 
"Yes. Yes. Yes! We have many things 
scheduled. The main event is the Spring 
Concert which is April 9. This will feature 
the sounds from "The Golden Musical 
Era." We will also sing at Founder's Day, 
A-Day, and graduation." 

RP: You belong to many clubs outside 
school. Can you give us any reasons 
why they are successful? 
"All the members of the clubs to which I 
belong believe in what they are doing. 
This means they are willing to give up 
time for the organization. Their pride in 
the organization and in what it does is a 
major reason for the success." 



WE NEED 
LIFE SAVERS 




Please Give Blood. 

PLEASE HELP US MEET "THE ULTIMATE CHALLENGE" 

APRIL 14, 1987 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM 

ALL-PURPOSE ROOM 

Our Goal Is 150 Pints! 

Blood donation sign-up sheets are available in the Residence Life Office, 
in the Snack Bar of the Student Center, and in the dorms. 




Clyde Peeling's Wonderful World of Reptiles 

Tuesday. March 31 at 7 30 pm at the Student Center APR. DVC students and faculty 
mission — $2 00 



FREE. General Ad 



Dear Editor, 

Dear Editor, 

Concerning the letter in Ram Pages 
February 28. 1987 about the Campus 
Communicator. The idea was conceived 
at a series of weekly meetings held by staff 
and faculty of the College about 18 
months ago. The original idea was to put 
out a newsletter that would be a link of 
communication among the employees of 
the college. Unfortunately like many 
good ideas this one went astray. What is 
now published is not what it was intend- 
ed to be. I agree with the letter writer that 
many of the articles in Campus Com- 
municator should be in Ram Pages. 
Campus Communicator was never 
meant to be a rival for news witb Ram 
Pages for campus news. It was strictly 
meant to be a source of information about 
employee happenings on campus — more 
newsy than news. 

Sincerely. 

Marianne Schumacher 

Secretary; 

Athletic Department 

STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT 

With elections coming up in April, it 
seems like a good time to discuss some 
key points about our Student Govern- 
ment. Who represents us on Student 
Government? What do they do? What's 
the purpose of government? 

Student Government at Delaware Val- 
ley College is set up in such a way that 
every segment of the college community 
is represented: 

A. Each class elects representatives 

B. Commuters elect representatives 

C. Residence Life appoints R.A. 
representative 

D. The faculty appoints a faculty 
advisor. 

E. The administrative advisor is the 
Dean of Students. 

Student representatives are elected to 
Student Government to represent and 
serve you. the student body. Some of 
the principle roles of Student Govern- 
ment are as follows: 

• participate in institutional 
government. 

• comment on and shape policies 
that impact on student life. 

• allocate student activities fees. 

• serve as a two-way informational 
conduit between the institution 
and the "typical" student. 

• manage or coordinate special 
events. 

• recognize and monitor student 
organizations 

• sit on faculty and administrative 
committees. 

• preserve the projects, activities, 
and improvement in the quality of 
student life gained by previous stu- 
dent organizations. 

There are. of course, other areas of 
concern that Student Government gets 
involved in each year. The bottom line is 
that the administration and faculty use 
Student Government as the "voice" of 
the students and rely on their opinions 
and feedback on all areas of student life. 

NOTICE TO SENIORS 

The Dinner Dance will be March 28. 
1987 at Shawnee-at-Highpoint. The cost 
is $10.00 for class members and $15.00 
for non -class members There will be a 
cocktail hour from 7-8 p.m. with dinner 
being served at 8 p.m. After dinner there 
will be dancing until 1 a.m. You will have 
a choice between stuffed fillet of flounder 
and prime rib for the main course. Tickets 
will be on sale in the cafeteria during din- 
ner on March 16, 17. 18. 19, 23. and 24 
For commuters they will be on sale in the 
Student Center during lunch on March 17 
and 18. If you have any questions please 
contact one of the class officers. 



Dear Editor, 

Dear Editor, 

Several weeks ago a letter appeared in 
Ram Pages concerning ideas for a new 
type of agricultural market stand to re- 
place the present stand operated by Scott 
Robertello. 

Since Scott has been operating this 
area at the college, he consistently showed 
improvements in both the vegetable and 
fruit produce and also in the stand itself 
which he moved to various areas in order 
to service the college community. 

Scott has always been willing to coop- 
erate with everyone — faculty and stu- 
dents alike and help in delivering products 
such as cider and apples to clubs for 
meetings and special projects. 

The most noticeable aspect was the 
way Scott worked with students — their 
enthusiasm in making cider, selling, and 
waiting on customers in a friendly helpful 
manner. 

I was very sorry to learn that Scott 
recently left the college for another posi- 
tion . He will be sorely missed by all those 
who knew him here. 

JoAnn Roberts 
Associate Professor 
Liberal Arts Department 

CLASS ELECTIONS 

Coming in April 

Traditionally. Delaware Valley College 
has had a very unique and strong system 
of Class Government. Class Officers or- 
ganize and coordinate the activities of 
their respective classes and also represent 
each class on Student Government. Each 
class elects the following officers every 
April: 

President 

Vice President 

Treasurer 

Secretary 

Rep. to Student Senate 

Rep. to Student Activities Committee 

Commuter Rep. 

In addition to representing you on Stu- 
dent Government. Class Officers have 
the responsibility of planning, coordinat- 
ing, and implementing activities for their 
classes. Class dues are collected each 
semester so that each class has their own 
treasury. Officers frequently poll class 
members on how they want the money 
spent and what activities they are interest- 
ed in during the academic year. 

Students interested in class office are 
encouraged to pick up petitions in the 
Dean of Students Office. 

Elections 
Coming in April 

Interested in "running" for Class Office, 
Student Government, or the Student 
Activities Committee? Any member of 
the student body who would like to 
become a candidate for positions in these 
organizations is encouraged to do so. 

In order to "run" for a position, can- 
didates should pick up a petition in Dean 
Tasker's office. Petitions need to be signed 
by members of the student body (35 sig- 
natures for Class Office and 50 signatures 
for Student Government Officers) and 
returned to the office three days before 
the election. Names will then be placed 
on the ballot. 

GET INVOLVED! 

CONCERT 

The dynamic multi-talented musical 
group Bright Morning Star will be in con- 
cert on April 11, 1987 at 8 p.m. at George 
School, Route 413, Newtown, Pa. as a 
prelude to the day-long 1987 Bucks 
County Peace Fair on May 16. Concert 
tickets are $8.00 for adults; $4.00 for 
children under 12. For information, call 
(215) 357-3857. 

Personals 

E.R. — Hair looks great, can't even tell 
the difference. 



Scholarships from 
Financial Aid Office 



The Board of Supervisors of the Free- 
hold Soil Conservation District announces 
that the Neal W. Munch and Marvin A. 
Clark Conservation Scholarships will be 
awarded again this year; two scholarships 
at $1,000 each will be given. 

The scholarships are awarded accord- 
ing to the following criteria: the applicant 
must be a resident of the Freehold District 
(which serves Middlesex and Monmouth 
Counties in New Jersey); must have suc- 
cessfully completed (or will have com- 
pleted by the award date) two years of 
study at an accredited college; must be 
an undergraduate enrolled in a curricu- 
lum majoring in an agricultural or natural 
resource or conservation area, i.e., forest- 
ry, conservation, soil science, resource 
management, environmental studies, en- 
vironmental science, or environmental 
education . 

The winner will be selected by the 
Supervisors of the Freehold Soil Con- 
servation District. 

Eligible students may secure an appli- 
cation from the District Office, 211 Free- 
hold Road, Manalapan, NJ 07726. The 
deadline for filing is July 1. 1987. 

Winners of the scholarships will be an- 
nounced by August, 1987. 

Questions should be directed to the 
District at (201) 446-2300. 

College Scholarships 
Available from the Chamber 

Four business sponsored scholarships 
are available from the Central Bucks 
Chamber of Commerce. Chamber mem- 
bers are providing funds for college bound 
students. Applications for each scholar- 
ship are available from the Chamber. 
348-3913 and Central Bucks County 
schools. A personal interview by Cham- 
ber committee is required. The applica- 
tion deadline is May 1. 

Penn Color Inc., Doylestown, manu- 
facturer of color pigment dispersions and 
concentrates, funds a $1,000 college tui- 
tion scholarship for graduating high 
school seniors who live in Central Bucks 
County. The Penn Color scholarship, 
which is structured and awarded by the 
Chamber, is specifically designed for a 
student whose college major is chemistry. 
The $1,000 chemistry scholarship may 
be applied towards tuition at any ac- 
credited college. 

The Hughes-Penglase & Associate art 
scholarship is a $500 tuition credit to the 
college of the recipient's choice. The 
scholarship is offered to graduating Cen- 
tral Bucks region high school seniors 
who wish to pursue a career in fine arts, 
theater, music, sculpture, or journalism . 
The Chamber's history and arts commit- 
tee makes the selection. The scholarship 
is funded by Hughes-Penglase & Associ- 
ates. Chalfont. 



PUBLIC 

INFOR MATION 

NE EDS 

TOUR 
GUIDES 

DESPERATELY! 

Call extention 2306 if you are interested 
in leading groups of 20-30 kindergarten 
and elementary kids on 1-1 Vi hour tours 
of dairy and farm 3. P.I. pays $5.00 per 
tour, cash. 

Tours begin March 23, Monday through 
May 4. 

GUIDES NEEDED: 
Mondays 12:45 3 Guides 
Tuesdays 10:00 4-5 Guides 
Thursdays 12:45 1 Guide 
Fridays 10:00 4 Guides 

Other times and days also available. 



The Krempa & Grasso free enterprise 
scholarship funded by the Krempa & 
Grasso Insurance Brokers and Financial 
Consultants of New Britain is designed to 
bring two qualified students into the 
business world. The free enterprise com- 
mittee selects a graduate of Central 
Bucks East and a graduate of Central 
Bucks West who plan to major in business. 
Each recipient receives $500 toward tui- 
tion at any college in Pennsylvania. 

The women in business scholarship 
conducted by the women in business 
committee assists women entering the 
job market or changing career direction. 
The scholarship is awarded to Bucks 
County residents planning to attend any 
Pennsylvania college. 

The Women in Business Scholarship 
is open to any woman beginning or con- 
tinuing education toward a career in 
business. This tuition credit is applicable 
to the college of the recipients choosing. 
An applicant must demonstrate educa- 
tional merit and financial need. In addi- 
tion, she must meet the following special 
conditions: 

1 . Minimum age requirement is 25 years 
old. 

2. Bucks County resident 

3. Application must be postmarked no 
later than May 1st. 

4. Appear for a personal interview. 

5. Enter college for full time or part time 
study in 1987 

6. Accept administration of scholarship 
grant by the college. 

7. Maintain "C" average or better during 
course of study. 

8. Applications available in Student Aid 
Office. 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 

INTERVIEWS FOR THE 

WEEK OF MARCH 23 

Monday, March 23 

NEW JERSEY DEPT. OF AG. 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

PEACE CORPS 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Tuesday, March 24 

SNIPES GARDEN CENTER 

Part time and full time employment 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Wednesday, March 25 

GIORGIO FOODS 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

GREEN ACRES 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

USDA 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Thursday, March 26 

ASGROW SEED CO. 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

HENKLE CO. 

Summer Internship 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Friday, March 27 

DOERLER LANDSCAPING 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 
Entertainment Editor . Kevin Dickmyer 

Reporters Jerry L. Fritz, 

Connie Hajioannou, 
Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors Anne Shobert. 

Mr. Edward O'Brien. 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news in the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 



ON THE TOWN 

A GUIDE TO WHAT'S HAPPENING IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 



Coors Veterans' Memorial Scholarship Fund 



by Kevin Dlckmyer 

If you're creative, theatrical, a little bit 
artsy, and not content with the usual, 
consider working at TREEHOUSE in the 
Philadlephia Zoo. For three months — 
June, July, and August — a few special 
people will get the chance to unlock the 
secrets of this magical place inside the 
Zoo. Help kids be a bee, hop like a frog, 
soar, slither, climb over, under or through, 
touch, smell, look and DISCOVER. 
What's it like to hobnob with a dinosaur, 
peer out through a four-story tree, sit in a 
chrysalis or activate all sorts of wonderful 
sights and sounds with a magic ring? Find 
out in TREEHOUSE. 

If dramatics are your forte, and you 
have a flair for the unusual, you owe 
yourself an interview. Beginning March 
18, call the Zoo at 243-1100, extensions 
336 or 283 and find out how work can 
be fun. 



The Run to Remember 
Our Philadelphia™" 

The Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans 
Memorial Fund, 1302 Sansom Street, is 
sponsoring its First Annual 10K Run. 
The starting point for the run is the foot 
of the steps of the Philadelphia Art Mu- 
seum, Sunday, April 12, 198 at 10:00 
a.m. All proceeds will benefit the Phila- 
delphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial to 
be constructed at Penn's Landing to 
commemorate the 625 Philadelphians 
who did not return and the many who did. 
Registration fee is $10.00. Prizes will be 
awarded to the top three finishers in 
several classes and T-shirts to all regis- 
trants. For more information on partici- 
pating in the run to honor your fellow 
Philadelphians, call 546-9500 between 
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday 
through Friday. 

For registration information contact 
Kevin at Ram Pages. 



Noted Historian to Speak 
at Mordecai M. Kaplan Memorial Lecture 



Reconstructionist Rabbinical College 
invites the community to hear noted 
historian Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg speak 
at the Mordecai M. Kaplan Memorial 
Lecture on Sunday, March 29 at 4:00 
p.m. at Stiteler Auditorium in Murphy 
Hall at Beaver College. Rabbi Hertzberg 
will speak on "Civil Religion and the 
Constitutional Question: A Jewish Per- 
spective." Coffee and tea will follow the 
lecture. There is no admission fee. 

Rabbi Hertzberg, who is Professor of 
Religion at Dartmouth College and Senior 
Research Associate at the Middle East In- 
stitute of Columbia University, is Rabbi 
Emeritus at Temple Emanu-EI. His pub- 
lications include the classic work The 
Zionist Idea, as well as Being Jewish in 
America, The French Enlightenment and 
the Jews, Judaism, Essays on Jewish Life 
and Thought and The Outbursts That 
Awaits Us. 

Rabbi Hertzberg is President of the 
American Jewish Policy Foundation . He 
is a former president of the American 



Jewish Congress and vice-president of 
the World Jewish Congress. He is a for- 
mer member of the Board of Governors 
of the Jewish Agency for Israel and a 
member of the Executive of the World 
Zionist Organization. 

The Mordecai M. Kaplan Memorial 
Lecture honors Rabbi Mordecai M. Kap- 
lan, the founder of the Reconstructionist 
approach to Judaism. Rabbi Kaplan's 
epic work Judaism as a Civilization has 
influenced generations of Jews since its 
publication in 1934. The Reconstruction- 
ist Rabbinical College trains rabbis and 
scholars for leadership of American Jewry, 
following the Reconstructionist approach 
to Judaism. Reconstructionism views 
Judaism as the evolving religious civili- 
zation of the Jewish people. It affirms 
that all Jews have the right, even the 
obligation, to participate in making 
Judaism both relevant to the historical 
period in which they live, while being 
faithful to the wisdom and culture of the 
Jewish heritage. 



Movies for the Week 

THE BARN -343-2088 

Platoon (R) 
7:15-9:30 

Mannequin (PG) 
7:15-9:15 

Lethal Weapon (R) 
7:15-9:30 

Some Kind of Wonderful (PG) 
7:30 - 9:30 

Outrageous Fortune (R) 
7:00 - 9:00 

ROUTE 309 CINEMA-646 4551 

Nightmare on Elm Street III (R) 
7:15-9:30 

Bedroom Window (R) 

8:00- 10:15 

Lethal Weapon (R) 

7:15-9:30 

Tin Men (R) 

7:45- 10:15 

Mannequin (PG) 

7:45 - 10:00 

Witchboard (R) 

7:30-9:45 

Black Widow (R) 

8:00- 10:15 

Some Kind of Wonderful (PG) 
7:15-9:30 

Crocodile Dundee (PG-13) 
8:00- 10:15 



Billboard's 
Top Singles 

WEEK ENDING 3/14/87 

1. "Lean On Me," Club Nouveau 

2. "Let's Wait Awhile," Janet Jackson 

3. "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now," 
Starship 

4. "Mandolin Rain," Bruce Hornsby & 
the Range 

5. "Somewhere Out There," Linda 
Ronstadt & James Ingram 

6. "Tonight, Tonight, Tonight," 
Genesis 

7. "Jacob's Ladder," Huey Lewis & 
The News 

8. "Respect Yourself," Bruce Willis 

9. "Come Go With Me," Expose 
10. "Big Time," Peter Gabriel 

TOP ALBUMS 

1. Licensed To III, Beastie Boys 

2. Slippery When Wet, Bon Jovi 

3. The Way It Is, Bruce Hornsby 

4. Graceland, Paul Simon 

5. Control, Janet Jackson 

6. Invisible Touch. Genesis 

7. Life, Love, and Pain, Club 
Nouveau 

8. The Final Countdown, Europe 

9. Georgia Satellites, George Satellites 



Adolph Coors Company today an 
nounced that application are now available 
for the 1987 Coors Veterans' Memorial 
Scholarship Fund which provides more 
than $500,000 to the sons and daughters 
of American veterans. 

For the third consecutive year, Coors 
and its distributors will award a minimum 
of 100 scholarships, with a maximum 
value of $5,000 each, to eligible students 
who successfully have completed their 
freshman year of college. The scholar- 
ships will assist students in completing 
the final years of their undergraduate 
studies. 

Since the scholarship program began 
in 1985, Coors has contributed a total of 
$1,007,000 to 238 scholarship recipients 
from all 50 states, the District of Colum- 
bia, Puerto Rico and Taiwan. Coors 
distributorships also raised more than 
$784,000 to award scholarships in their 
local communities. Another 15 scholar- 
ships were funded through proceeds 
totaling $57,000 raised from the 1986 
"Coors Presents Lee Greenwood" con- 
cert tour where a percentage of each 
ticket sold was donated to the scholar- 
ship fund. 

Thanks to the efforts of our distributors, 
a talented performer like Lee Greenwood 
and our customers, the Coors Veterans' 
Memorial Scholarship Fund continues to 
honor those American veterans who 
have served our country so courageous- 
ly," said Peter Coors, Brewing Division 
president. 

To be eligible for consideration, ap- 
plicants must: 

• be 22 years old or younger as of the 
July 1. 1987, application deadline 
date. 

• have a cumulative grade point average 



of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale. 

• have completed a minimum full fresh- 
man year program of credit hours, but 
not yet acquired senior credit hours. 

• be enrolled full time in a four-year in- 
stitution of higher education in the 
United States or an accredited two-year 
program leading to a four-year under- 
graduate degree. 

• fall into one of the following categories: 
dependent of Honorably Discharged 
American service personnel 
dependent of Active Duty, Guard, or 
Reserve military personnel (minimum 
two years) 

dependent of American service per- 
sonnel Killed in Action, Missing in Ac- 
tion or who have Died in the Line of 
Duty. 

Applications can be obtained from local 
Coors distributors or participating veter- 
ans organizations, by writing Coors Vet- 
erans' Memorial Scholarship Fund, P.O. 
Box 3111, Northbrook, IL 60065, or by 
calling toll-free 1-800-49COORS. Com- 
pleted applications and materials must be 
postmarked on or before July 1, 1987. 
Coors, the nation's fifth-largest brewer, 
has a long history of commitment to 
America's military veterans and their 
families. Veterans comprise approximate- 
ly one-third of Coors' 9,600-employee 
work force. The company was named 
the 1985 Employer of the Year by the 
Veterans of Foreign Wars, Colorado 
Employer of the Year by the American 
Legion 1981 through 1985, and the 
1983 National Large Employer of the 
Year by the Disabled American Veterans. 
Coors also received an award of recog- 
nition from the Veterans of Foreign Wars 
in 1985 for the Coors Veterans' Memor- 
ial Scholarship Fund. 




Horticulture in Germany 
Trends for the 90's 

Dr. J.C. Raulston, North Carolina State 
University, Professor of Horticulture. 
Traveler. Plant Explorer. FRIDAY, 
MARCH 20. 8:00 p.m.. DVC Mandell 
Hall Auditorium. 

Espaliers and Topiary 
Specialized Pruning 

Chris Woods, English Horiculturist and 
Head Horticulturist at the Chanticleer 
Estate. MONDAY. MARCH 30. 8:00 
p.m.. DVC Mandell Hall Auditorium. 

Admission is free. 



Student 
Activities Committee 

The Student Activities Committee 
(SAC.) at Delaware Valley College is a 
very important part of Student Govern- 
ment. It is the primary organization on 
campus responsible for programming 
social events. Every student at the college 
pays a yearly student government fee of 
$40.00 and a large portion of this fund is 
allocated to SAC. in order to plan and 
present quality programs and social affairs 
for the student body. Members of SAC. 
meet frequently to select various types of 
entertainment for students. Examples 
are dances, movies, performing artists, 
lecturers, concerts, special events, D.J.'s. 
etc. 

You can become directly involved in 
selecting entertainment and choosing 
events to occur on campus. You can also 
help to produce these events throughout 
the academic year. 

Each class, and also the commuter 
population elect representatives to the 
Student Activities Committee each year 
Students interested in SAC. are encour- 
aged to pick up a petition in the Dean of 
Students Office for elections which take 
place in April. 



Think You Can 
Write Comedy? 

College students seeking careers in 
Hollywood inevitably ask: "How do I get 
my foot in the door?" 

Comedian /actor Jimmie Walker, who 
sprang to national prominence when he 
portrayed the wisecracking "J.J." on the 
"Good Times" series, wants to give a 
break to college writers who think they 
know how to write jokes for stand-up 
comedy. 

Walker, who will soon be seen in the 
feature film release "My African Adven- 
ture," and will also star in his own TV 
series "Bustin' Loose" this fall, began his 
career writing jokes for other comics 
Now, he is soliciting material from student 
joke -writers. 

If Walker uses the material, he will pay 
the writers. A less tangible, but probably 
more consequential, reward will be that 
the writers will have established comedy- 
writing credits with a comedy/TV/film 
personality — which can only be of bene- 
fit to the students in their efforts to get 
started in Hollywood. 

Any student wishing to submit material 
to Walker should send it to his Hollywood 
office which is located at 9000 Sunset 
Blvd., Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 
90069. Students should also make sure 
to enclose their name, address, and 
phone number, so that Walker can locate 
them in the event that he is interested in 
their material. 

Photography Club News 

Reorganizational Meeting 

Monday, March 23 at 7:00 p.m. 

Student Center, Room 201 

Anyone interested in photography 
should attend this meeting. The topics 
planned for discussion include officers for 
the newly reformed club, pictures for 
Ram Pages, the yearbook, and A -Day 
activities. Come out and sharpen up your 
picture taking and learn to use the dark 
room. 




pOR* 




&Vv?-iJp 




Champ Hogan faces his toughest challenge ever in 
Andre the Giant at 6-7 and 450 pounds and is un 
defeated in 150 bouts 



Sports Trivia '87 

Because of the fact that Ram Pages 
Sports Trivia winning tickets are being 
abused. Sports Trivia will be out until a 
new, non -transferable ticket can be 
found. 

Thank You, 
John Litzke 

tilt I 111 I ITS BACK III till 1 1 

AEROBICS 

Every Monday & Wednesday 

4:15 to 5:45 P.M. 

IN THE ALL-PURPOSE ROOM 

STARTING FEBRUARY 2 

Get a jump on summer!!! 

Look and feel better! 
Come out and participate! 



Wrestlemania III 
Is Coming March 29 

Matches include: Hulk Hogan vs. An- 
dre the Giant for the title; Hart Founda- 
tion and Danny Davis vs. British Bulldogs 
and Tito Sontana for the title: Butch 
Reed vs. Koko B. Ware; Adrian Adonis 
vs. Roddy Piper; "King" Harley Race vs. 
Junkyard Dog; Ricky Steamboat vs. 
Randy "Macho Man" Savage; Killer 
Bees vs. Shiek/Volkoff: Can Am Con- 
nection vs. Valentine/ Beefcake; Hillbilly 
Jim and 2 Good Midgets vs. King Kong 
Bundy and 2 Bad Midgets; Hercules 
Hernandez vs. Billy Jack Haynes. For 
ticket information call the Spectrum or 
the ticketron. 




Manley, Dalton Scalp Warriors 

Rope Unravels with 14 

off Bench; Green, Reason 

Double Figures in Assists 

by John Litzke 

It was no contest as the highly talented 
J.V. Aggies finished their season at 5-2 
and in impressive fashion with a 108-83 
victory over the visiting Lycoming J.V. 

It was all DVC in the first half jumping 
out to a 44-31 lead paced by Brian Man- 
ley, Mike Dalton, and Rope with eight 
apiece. Lyco was led by Tory Shimp 
with 17 and Dean Mix with eight. 

DVC jumped out 7-0 at the outset of 
the second half to take a 51-31 advantage 
on buckets by Dalton, Brown, and Rope 
and had their largest lead of the evening 
at 83-48 at the 8:43 of the game and the 
rest is much of the same. Mike Dalton 
was the top scorer for DVC with 23 and 
he went on a 13-0 run by himself mid- 
way through the second half. Brian Man 
ley finished with 16 and showed his 
3-point strength by hitting four of them. 
Rope, coming off the bench, entwined 
the Warriors and their bench with 14 big 
points. And finishing off the top scorers 
was Joe Brown with 13. 

Guards Bill Green and Mark Reason 
also had outstanding games scoring nine 
and six respectively and dishing out 22 
assists between them. 

Shimp led Lycoming scorers with 27 
while Duanne Struppler and Dean Mix 
added 21 in the losing game. 

The strength of the junior varsity this 
season, has to give Coach Werkiser 
more confidence and depth for next 
season . 



Savage (above) defends title against The Dragon 



EMO DETHRONES DOUBLE STUFF 78-68 
SIMO, LEWANDOWSKI BUCKET 22 EACH 



"You're doomed, Underdog," shrieked 
the devious, no good Simon Bar Sinister 
as a bound Underdog was lowered in a 
boiling kettle of sulfuric acid mixed with 
some sort of mind twisting, personality 
altering substance. "Once you're finished, 
the world is mine," finished that dastardly 
cad Sinister. 

EMO, finishing up the season with an 
aven 3-3 record, was the decided under- 
dog in the 1987 Delaware Valley College 
Intramural Basketball Championship fac- 
ing the sinister presence of Double Stuff, 
the Gold Division Champ and undefeated 
favorite to win it all. 

But the "underdog" reached the energy 
pill in his ring and with a burst of sudden 
strength, broke his bonds and put Simon 
Bar Sinister in his place, behind bars. 

And in a way, that is precisely what 
EMO did as, behind the game high of 22 
from Rich Simononis, 20 from Tom 
Lewandowski and 18 from Sean Smith 
they thrashed defending champion Dou- 
ble Stuff 78-68 before 50 or so screaming 
intramural psychopaths in James Work 
Gym. 

The defending champs took the early 
lead on buckets by Big Nol, Daddy Keich, 
and Big 2 Mike Zendt but EMO would 
battle back to deadlock it at 14 all at the 
11:35 mark of the first half. EMO would 
never look back from this point on, as 
poor shooting by Double Stuff sunk them 



deeper in a hole. A late first half surge 
ended with Nolan hitting one of two from 
the line and Tom Lewandowski hitting a 
EMO basket for a 40-31 lead at the half. 

Sims led all scorers at the half with 13 
and concluding the halftime highs for 
EMO were Lewandowski with 10 and 
Shawn Smith with eight. Forward Brandt 
Nolan led Double Stuff with nine and 
Mike Zendt added eight. 

EMO came out like a superball whipped 
against a brick wall jumping out to their 
largest lead of the game at 55-35 at 
14: 12 of the game. Double Stuff needed 
regrouping and that's what Head Coach 
James Dudley did as, following a timeout. 
Double Stuff went on a 17-5 run to pull 
them within eight at 60-52 at 7:30. 

Poor shooting and shot selection 
plagued Double Stuff throughout the 
game. They would come close, but just 
couldn't sink the key basket. Sophomore 
guard Daryll Ellison brought Double Stuff 
as close as they would get with a basket 
at 1:46 of the game to make it 70-66. 

With the Stuff being over the limit. 
EMO spent the rest of the game on the 
free throw line and rode the victory waves 
to the shore for their first championship. 
Congratulations to Coaches McNulty 
and Bedesem who have to be proud of 
these guys and to the entire EMO team 

While I'm congratulating. I'd like to 
congratulate Double Stuff and the Run- 



ning Rebels on their undefeated seasons 
and to all those who participated, nice 
job! 

Thank you to all those who helped 
keep score throughout and a personal 
thank you to all for some fun and exciting 
basketball. 



Double Stuff FG FT FTA TOTAL 



NOLAN 


8 2 


4 


18 


ZENDT 


6 


5 


15 


TREFFINGER 


4 





8 


ROTHMALLER 


2 





4 


ELLISON 


5 





11 


WALTON 


1 





2 


KEICH 


4 2 


2 


10 




31 4 


11 


68 


EMO 


FG FT FTA 1 


roT/ 


SIMONONIS 


8 2 


4 


22 


HEISY 


1 





2 


SUCOLOSKI 











KOBRYZNSKI 


3 2 


2 


8 


SCHADE 


2 2 


2 


6 


CANALE 


1 





2 


FOX 











LEWANDOWSKI 


10 2 


4 


22 


SMITH 


3 10 


12 


16 




28 18 


24 


78 



Officials: B. Boyle, Leinbach. Estep 

Scorer: D. 

Timer: J. Litzke 

Attendance: 50 (Screaming Psychopaths) 



DVC Football 1986: 
Banquet Update 

On Sunday, February 22, 1987 the 
Delaware Valley College football family 
held its annual banquet at the Warrington 
Inn on Route 611. 

Head Coach Al Wilson formally an- 
nounced his resignation and new Coach 
Dick Bedesem was introduced. Mr. Wil- 
son will be missed but we congratulate 
him on a job well done and wish him the 
best of luck. He will remain as Athletic 
Director here at DVC. 

Coach Bedesem didn't say much, but 
what he said hit like a run away freight 
train into the Great Wall of China. He 
gave a brief autobiography and finished 
by saying "I'll tell you one thing, I didn't 
come here to lose." I'm looking forward 
to next season. Here are the award win- 
ners of DVC football 1986: 

1986 Post-Season Award Winners 

All-Middle Atlantic Conference 

First Team: 

Jim Wilson, Running Back 
Chuck Hieber. Down Lineman 

Honorable Mention: 

Joe Harby. Offensive Guard 
Steve Clark, Defensive Back 

All-Eastern Collegiate 

Athletic Conference 

First Team: 

Jim Wilson, Running Back 
Chuck Hieber, Defensive Line 

Maxwell Football Club 
Player of the Week 

Vince Bedesem, Linebacker 
ECAC Honor Roll 

Vince Bedesem, September 20 

Chuck Hieber, October 11 

Jim Wilson, November 1 

Middle Atlantic Conference 
Player of the Week 

Vince Bedesem, Defensive vs. Albright 

Rich Simononis, Defensive 

vs. Susquehanna 

Jim Wilson, Offensive vs. Wilkes 

Doylestown Moose Club 
Player of the Week 

Brian Clapp Walt Kobryznski 

Steve Clark Tom Lewandowski 

Jim Hannon Mike Williams 

Joe Harby Tom Voell 

Mike Heisey Jon Wilson 

Rookie of the Year 

Bob Koperna 
Mr. Consistency (Offensive Line) 

Brian Clapp 

Mr. Consistency (Defensive Line) 

Joe Bello 

Unsung Hero 

Tom Lewandowski 

Players Award 

Tim Goll 

Trenchman Award 

Tom Voell 

Coaches Award 

Walt Kobryznski 

Outstanding Offensive Lineman 

Joe Harby 

Outstanding Defensive Lineman 

Chuck Hieber 

Outstanding Offensive Back 

Jim Wilson 

Outstanding Defensive Back 

Mike Heisey 

Coal Cracker Award 

Jim Hannon 

Roy Jessup Award 

Mike Williams & Jesse Perkins 

Rosner N. Trio I '35 Memorial Award 

Jon Wilson 

James Work '13 Chancellor's Award 

Steve Clark 

Academic Achievement Award 

Steve Clark 



1987 MEN'S INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL 

FINAL STATS 



GREEN 

RUNNING REBELS: 

Record: 6-0; Finish: 1st 



NAME 


G 


TOTAL 


AVG 


Boyle, B 


6 


82 


13.6 


Leinbach 


6 


67 


11.2 


Kennedy 


6 


63 


10.5 


Boyle. C. 


6 


54 


9.0 


Brennan 


5 


28 


5.6 


Arnold 


6 


32 


5.3 


Rother 


3 


12 


4.0 


Snyder 


4 


10 


2.5 



AVG. PTS./GAME: 59.3 

MOST PTS./IND.: Bill Boyle, 21 vs. 

Bambino Magicians 

MOST PTS./TEAM: 71 vs. Wolfpack 

PSYCHOTIC HOOP: 

Record: 3-1; Finish: 2nd 

NAME G TOTAL AVG. 

Stanton 4 64 16.0 

Wheaton 4 46 11.5 

Carter 3 23 7.6 

McSherry 4 29 7.3 

Widmer 4 13 3.3 

Calderaio 2 6 3.0 

Hibbard 2 5 2.5 

Vandenberghe 3 6 2.0 

AVG. PTS./GAME: 46.8 

MOST PTS./IND.: Stanton. 23 vs. 

EMO 

MOST PTS./TEAM: 57 vs. Bambino 

Magicians 

EMO: 

Record: 3-3; Finish: 3rd 

NAME G TOTAL AVG. 

Simononis 6 87 14.5 

Schade 6 63 10.5 

Smith 5 51 10.2 

Lewandowski. T 2 13 6.5 

Kobryznski 6 34 5.6 

Sucoloski 5 22 4.4 

Bedesem 4 14 3.5 

Canale 3 10 3.3 

Heisy 3 5 1.6 

McNulty 2 3 1.5 

AVG. PTS./GAME: 53.3 

MOST PTS./IND : Simononis. 24 vs. 

Psychotic Hoop 

MOST PTS./TEAM: 62 vs. Wolfpack 

GARGOYLES: 
Record: 2 3; Finish 

NAME G 

Hering 5 

Hepner 4 

Cooper 5 

Hartung 5 

Mucci 5 

Knight 3 

Butcher 4 

AVG. PTS./GAME: 47.4 

MOST PTS./IND.: Hering. 20 vs. 

Wolfpack 

MOST PTS./TEAM: 50 vs. Wolfpack 

and Psychotic Hoop 

WOLFPACK: 
Record: 2-3; Finish 



Tied for 4th 
TOTAL AVG. 



81 
35 
39 
33 
27 
14 
6 



16.2 
8.7 
7.8 
6.6 
5.4 
4.6 
1.5 



NAME 

Courts 

Albany 

McGlone 

Pietrefesa 

Hogan 

Shilling 

Powell 

Annan 

Seidel 



G 

5 
3 
4 
3 
2 
2 
4 
4 
3 



Tied for 4th 
TOTAL AVG. 



88 
29 
37 
23 
14 
7 

13 
9 
4 



17.6 
9.6 
9.3 
7.6 
7.0 
3.5 
3.3 
2.3 
1.3 



AVG PTS./GAME: 48 
MOST PTS./IND.: Courts, 20 vs. 
Running Rebels and EMO 
MOST PTS./TEAM: 64 vs. EMO 

BAMBINO MAGICIANS: 
Record: 2-4; Finish: 6th 



NAME 

Moran 

Butterworth 

D'Ambra 

Sukeena 

Koperna 

Devon 

Zaborowski 



G 

4 
5 
6 
6 
6 
2 
5 



TOTAL 

57 
69 
54 
51 
34 
6 
11 



AVG. 

14.3 
13.8 
9.0 
8.5 
5.6 
3.0 
2.2 



AVG. PTS./GAME: 49.3 
MOST PTS./IND.: Moran, 21 vs. 
Running Rebels 
MOST PTS./TEAM: 54 vs. 
Space Between 

SPACE BETWEEN: 
Record: 0-5; Finish: 7th 



-i ... 



NAME 

Boltz 

Brirtner 

Pierce 

Martella 

Bachur 

Spangler 

Brinsky 

Snader 

Hatch 



G 

5 
5 
4 
3 
5 
3 
3 
4 
3 



TOTAL 

63 
26 
18 
11 
12 

7 

7 

8 

3 



AVG. 

12.6 
5.2 
4.5 
3.6 
2.4 
23 
23 
2.0 
1.0 



AVG. PTS./GAME: 32.2 
MOST PTS./IND.: Boltz. 14 vs. 
Psychotic Hoop 
MOST PTS./TEAM: 36 vs. 
Psychotic Hoop 






GOLD 
DOUBLE STUFF: 
Record: 6-0; Finish: 1st 

G TOTAL 



NAME 

Nolan 

Keich 

Zendt 

Treffinger 

Rothmaller 

Ellison 

Walton 

Wilson 



5 
6 
6 
6 
5 
6 
6 
6 



68 
82 
78 
71 
51 
47 
33 
24 



AVG. 

13.6 

13.6 

13.0 

11.8 

10.2 

7.8 

5.5 

4.0 



AVG. PTS./GAME: 76.8 
MOST PTS./IND.: Keich. 22 vs. 
Running Rabbi's 
MOST PTS./TEAM: 87 vs. 
Running Rabbi's 

TERPS: 

Record: 5-1; Finish: 2nd 

NAME G TOTAL AVG. 

Zecchino 6 127 21.2 

Lewandowski. M. 5 65 13.0 

McDyer 6 41 6.8 

Reiser 6 36 6.0 

Perry 5 27 5.4 

McKeogh 6 21 3.5 

Reigel 6 12 2.0 

AVG PTS./GAME: 54.2 

MOST PTS./IND.: Zecchino. 26 vs. 

Blue Demons 

MOST PTS./TEAM: 66 vs. 

Blue Demons 

BLUE DEMONS - CHIEFS CREW: 
Record: 3 2; Finish: 3rd 

G 



NAME 

Sterling 

Hoffner 

Reaver 

Hannichick 

Savoy 

Darbenzio 

Zellers 

Hower 



5 
4 
3 
4 
5 
2 
3 
5 



3TAL 


AVG 


168 


33.6 


60 


15.0 


38 


12.6 


28 


7.0 


24 


4.8 


5 


2.5 


6 


2.0 


7 


1.4 



AVG. PTS./GAME: 68.4 
MOST PTS./IND.: Sterling. 45 vs 
Double Stuff 
MOST PTS./TEAM: 93 vs. Terps 

RUNNING RABBI'S: 

Record: 3-4; Finish: 4th 

NAME G TOTAL AVG. 

Gilbert 6 124 20.6 

Wisenberg 5 78 15.6 

Stamm 6 54 9.0 

Clair 5 23 4.6 

Gambone 5 21 4.2 

Cimokowski 6 16 2.6 

Burkhardt 4 8 2.0 

Hartzel 2 2 1.0 

AVG. PTS./GAME: 54.3 
MOST PTS./IND.: Gilbert. 29 vs. 
Blue Demons 
MOST PTS./TEAM: 72 vs. Agboh 

BOFFERS: 

Record: 1-4; Finish: 5th 

NAME G TOTAL AVG. 

Vinitsky 4 79 19.7 

White 5 42 8.4 



4 


19 


4.8 


4 


17 


4.3 


5 


20 


4.0 


4 


8 


2.0 


3 


6 


2.0 



Ford 

Hamm 

Mellma 

Orban 

Braucher 

AVG. PTS./GAME: 40.2 

MOST PTS./IND.: Vinitsky, 24 vs. 

Agboh 

MOST PTS./TEAM: 59 vs. Agboh 

ALL-DVC 1st TEAM: 

Paul Sterling 
Dan Courts 
Craig Terffinger 
Doug Hering 
Brandt Nolan 



G Demons 

G Wolfpack 

C Dbl. Stuff 
F Gar. 

F Dbl. Stuff 



ALL-DVC 2nd TEAM: 

Paul Leinbach G 

Dave Keich G 

Bob Kennedy C 

Don Zecchino F 

Clay Butterworth F 

ALL-DVC 3rd TEAM: 

Rich Simononis G 

Marty Hoffner G 

Eric Schade C 

Tim Moran F 

Frank Gilbert F 

ALL-DVC 4th TEAM: 



R Rebels 
Dbl. Stuff 
R Rebels 

Terps 
Bambino 

EMO 

Demons 

EMO 
Bambino 
R Rabbi's 



Bill Boyle 
Dan Wisenberg 
Seamus McGlone 
Mark Vinitsky 
Mike Zendt 



G R Rebels 

G R Rabbi's 

C Wolfpack 

F Boffers 

F Dbl. Stuff 

HONORABLE MENTION: Lamont 
Rothmaller. DS; Dave Hannichick. BD; 
Kevin Stanton. PH; Ray Boltz, SB; 
Steve D'Ambra, BM; Leo Reaver. BD: 
Mark Fritsche. Agboh, Daryl Ellison. DS; 
Scott Cooper, Gar.; Chris Boyle. R 
Rebels; Matt Wheaton. PH; John Su- 
keena. BM; Walt Kobryznski, EMO; 
Mike Lewandowski, Terps; D.J. McDyer, 
Terps; Shawn Smith, EMO. 

ALL ROOKIE TEAM: 

Eric Schade C EMO 

Tim Moran C/F Dbl. Stuff 

Craig Treffinger C/F Dbl. Stuff 

Frank Gilbert G/F R Rabbi's 

Dan Wisenberg G/F R Rabbi's 

ALL SENIOR TEAM: 

Rich Simononis G EMO 

Chris Boyle G R Rebels 

Mark Vinitsky C Boffers 

Walt Kobryznski F EMO 

Don Zecchino F Terps 

TEAM G PTS. AVG. 

Double Stuff 6 461 76.8 

Blue Demons 5 342 68.4 

Running Rebels 6 356 59.3 

Running Rabbi's 6 326 54.3 

Terps 5 325 54.2 

EMO 6 320 53.3 

Bambino Magicians 6 257 49.3 

Wolfpack 6 240 48.0 

Gargoyles 6 237 47.4 

Psychotic Hoop 4 187 46.8 

Boffers 5 201 40.2 

Space Between 5 161 32.2 

Agboh 5 107 21.4 



Indoor Track at 
Dickinson College 

MARCH 7, 1987 

55 Meter Dash: (Heats) Caffey. 6.56; 

Dickmyer, 6.62; Gilbert, 6.77; 

Wilson. 6.45; (Finals) Wilson, 6.6. 

4th; Caffey, 6.6, 5th 
400 Dash: Tom Makowski, 55.62 
200 Dash: Kevin Dickmyer, 24.42, 

2nd; Steve Caffey. 24.60. 3rd; Jim 

Wilson, 25.23 
Long Jump: Frank Gilbert. 20 '1" 
Triple Jump: Steve Caffey. 40 '-7" 
1500 Meter: Ken McDaid. 4:19.84 



Regular Season 
NAME 

Sterling 

Zecchino 

Gilbert 

Vinitsky 

Coutis 

Hering 

Stanton 

Wisenberg 

Hoffner 

Simononis 

Moran 

Butterworth 

Boyle. B 

Keich 

Nolan 

Benner 

Lewandowski, M 

Zendt 

Boltz 

Reaver 

Treffinger 

Wheaton 

Leinbach 

Kennedy 

Schade 

Smith 

Rothmaller 

Albany 

Fritsche 

McGlone 

D'Ambra 

Stamm 

Boyle. C 

Hepner 

Sukeena 

White 

Ellison 

Cooper 

Pietrefesa 

Carter 

McSherry 

Hogan 

Hannichick 

McDyer 

Hartung 

Lewandowski. T. 

Reiser 

Kobryznski 

Koperna 

Brennan 

Walton 

Perry 



Scoring Leaden 
TEAM G 

BD 



Terps 

RRab 

Boff 

WP 

Gar. 

PH 

RRab 

BD 

EMO 

BM 

BM 

RReb 

DS 

DS 

Agboh 

Terps 

DS 

SB 

BD 

DS 

PH 

RReb 

RReb 

EMO 

EMO 

DS 

WP 

Agboh 

WP 

BM 

RRab 

R Reb 



5 

6 
6 
4 
5 
5 
4 
5 
4 
6 
4 
5 
6 
6 
5 
2 
5 

5 

3 
6 
4 
6 
6 

a 

5 

5 
3 
5 
4 
6 
6 
6 
4 
b 
5 
6 
5 
3 
3 
4 
2 
4 
6 
:> 
2 
6 
6 
6 
5 
6 
5 



Rebounding 
NAME 

Sterling 

McGlone 

Butterworth 

Schade 

Hannichick 

Kennedy 

Treffinger 

Nolan 

Hering 

Stanton 

Zecchino 

Pierce 

Gilbert 

White 

Vinitsky 

Brennan 

Wheaton 

Moran 

Clair 

Burkhardt 

Widmer 

Zendt 

Perry 

Brirtner 

Mellema 



Leaders: Final 
TEAM 

BD 

WP 

BM 

EMO 

BD 

RReb 

DS 

DS 

Gar 

PH 

Terps 

RRab 

Boff 

Boff 

RReb 

PH 

BM 

R Rab 

RRab 

PH 

DS 

Terps 

SB 

Boff 



G 

5 

4 
5 
6 

4 
6 
5 

5 
5 
r > 
4 
4 
5 
r > 
5 
4 

5 

4 
4 
3 
3 
5 
3 
5 
5 



: Final 
TL 

168 
127 
124 

79 

88 

81 

64 

78 

60 

87 

57 

69 

82 

82 

68 

27 

68 

78 

63 

38 

71 

46 

67 

63 

63 

51 

51 

29 

48 

37 

54 

54 

54 

35 

51 

42 

47 

39 

23 

23 

29 

14 

28 

41 

33 

13 

36 

34 

34 

28 

33 

27 



TL 

77 
51 
63 
75 
45 
66 
55 
54 
52 
47 
36 
33 
40 
40 
40 
32 
40 
29 
28 
21 
19 
32 
18 
29 
28 



AVG 

336 

212 

20.6 

19.7 

17.6 

162 

160 

15.6 

15.0 

14.5 

143 

13.8 

136 

13.6 

136 

13.5 

136 

13.0 

126 

126 

11.8 

11.5 

11.2 

10.5 

105 

10.2 

10.2 

9.6 

96 

9.3 

90 

90 

9.0 

8.7 

8.5 

8.4 

7.8 

7.8 

7.6 

7.6 

7.3 

7.0 

70 

6.8 

6.6 

6.5 

60 

56 

56 

5.6 

55 

54 



AVG 

154 

128 

12.6 

125 

113 

110 

11.0 

108 

104 

94 

90 

8,3 

80 

80 

8.0 

8.0 

80 

7.3 

7.0 

7.0 

68 

64 

6.0 

58 

56 



Women's Hockey Update 

CYJ 5 - Dairy 4 

At DVC, CYJ received high scoring 
output from Karen Vincent with a hat 
trick plus one and Joell Pursell added 
one of her own as they dropped the Dairy 
5-4 in an interleague matchup. 

KKPW Crushes CYJ: 15-0 

KKPW completely dominated CYJ 
the entire game. Scorers included Tammy 
Petraskie with six. Barb Hemler with five, 
Lisa Long and Stacy Yoder with two 
apiece. The game was under the offen- 
sive control of KKPW with only a few 
shots on goal by the opponent. Randi 
Kunkel, at goalie, prevented scoring. 
KKPW's record increases to 4-0. 



WRESTLING RESULTS: 

MACS & NATIONALS 

DVC SOARS 

The DVC Wrestling team, under the 
guidance of Head Coach Robert Marshall, 
has just completed a very successful 
tournament swing. 

In the MAC championships, seven Ag- 
gies finished atop their weight class (see 
results below) while the team finished by 
itself in dominating fashion in first place 
with 173.75 pts. to second place Lycom- 
ing's 102.50. 

In the National competition, three Ag- 
gies finished with All-American status as 
junior Shaun Smith finished second in 
the 142 lb. weight class, freshman Randy 
Worrell finished sixth at 167 and fresh- 
man Garth Lakitsky finished eighth at 
177. 

Many congratulations to the 1986-87 
Aggie wrestling team and to all the 
champions. 

MAC FINAL RESULTS 

1. Delaware Valley . . 173.75 

2. Lycoming 102.50 

3. Ursinus 94.25 

4. Moravian 74.00 

5. Scranton 70.75 

6. Swarthmore 62.25 

7. Susquehanna 42.25 

8. Western Maryland 37.00 

9. Messiah 32.25 

10. Elizabethtown 31.50 

11. Muhlenberg 30.75 

12. King's 19.75 

13. (tie) Gettysburg 17.50 

Johns Hopkins 17.50 

15.Haverford 11.50 

16. Widener 9.50 

17. Upsala 6.50 

18. Lebanon Valley 4.00 

19. Albright 3.50 

20. Juniata . . 2.00 

INDIVIDUAL RESULTS 
118 

1. Rich Williams (So). DVC 

2. Brian Maw (Jr), Lycoming 

3. Ed LeDonne (Sr), Swarthmore 

4. Jeff Forrer (So), Elizabethtown 

5. Tim Seislove (So). Ursinus 

6. Gary Ruschman (So). Moravian 

126 

1 . Brent Whitesel (So) . Messiah 

2. Steve Laudermilch (So). Ursinus 

3. Dan Canale (Sr). DVC 

4. Eric Swank (So). King's 

5. Tim Gerber (So), Elizabethtown 

6. Tim Layer (Jr), Widener 

134 

1. JimBodai (Fr), DVC 

2. Jim Yost (So) , Moravian 

3. Pat Lutz (So). Lycoming 

4. Roger Welser (So), Swarthmore 

5. Dino Delviscio (Sr), Elizabethtown 

6. Cordell Musser (Jr), Messiah 

142 

1. Shaun Smith (Jr), DVC 

2. Dan Donahoe (Jr), Ursinus 

3. Gary Allmers (Fr), Susquehanna 

4. John Potash (Sr), Swarthmore 

5. Rob Nourian (So). Scranton 

6. Matt Miller (Fr), Lycoming 

150 

1. Tracy Snyder (Jr), DVC 

2. Jay Peichel (So), Swarthmore 

3. Dennis Udicious (So), Scranton 

4. Brian Hons (So), Ursinus 

5. Troy Gardner (Fr), Lycoming 

6. Doug Kent (Jr), Upsala 

158 

1. Scott Schlenker (Jr), Muhlenberg 

2. Chris Labrecque (Jr), Susquehanna 

3. Steve Daigle (So). Scranton 

4. Jim Purcell (Sr), Gettysburg 

5. Skip Sinak (Jr), W. Maryland 

6. Bernie Janusz (Sr), King's 

167 

1. Randy Worrell (Fr), DVC 

2. Rich Brendel (Sr), Moravian 

3. John Bokal (So), Scranton 

4. Bill Young (Fr), Lycoming 

5. Kevin Ross (So). Ursinus. 

6. George Sax (Fr), Susquehanna 



177 

1. Garth Lakitsky (Fr), DVC 

2. Mike Martinovich (Jr), W. Maryland 

3. Bryan Neidigh (Fr), Lycoming 

4. Chuck Odgers (Jr), Ursinus 

5. Kevin Daly (Jr), Haverford 

6. Mark Lausten (So), Scranton 

190 

1. Vince Bedesem (So), DVC 

2. Mark Minotti (Jr), Moravian 

3. Bob Doetzer (Sr), Scranton 

4. Joe Bitner (Fr), Lycoming 

5. Steve Gandia (Jr), Swarthmore 

6. Ed Singer (Sr), W. Maryland 

HWT 

1. Mike Gilmore (So). Lycoming 

2. Ron Matthew (So), Ursinus 

3. Alex Wilson (Jr), Moravian 

4. Tom Kallup (Sr), Johns Hopkins 

5. Chuck Heiber (Jr), DVC 

6. Greg Carl (Sr), Susquehanna 

Phillies Launch 

Home Opener 

With Rocketman 

The goal posts have come down. Next 
month, the stadium crew begins return- 
ing Veterans' Stadium into a baseball field 
again. 

Yes. this season is just around the 
corner. 

The Phillies' 81 -game home schedule 
gets under way with the opener, 7:35 
Friday night, April 10. It will be the 
Chicago Cubs against the Phillies in the 
first of a four-game series which carries 
through Monday night. 

Then, the World Champion New 
York Mets make their first of three 1987 
appearances, Tuesday through Thursday 
nights. April 14-16. 

Something special will again be hap- 
pening on Opening Night, a tradition at 
the Phillies. 

Mike Schmidt will be presented with 
his record-tying Most Valuable Player 
Award. The veteran home run champion 
won his third MVP Award last season, 
matching only Stan Musial and Roy 
Campanella in National League history. 

In keeping with a Philadelphia tradi- 
tion, the first ball of the new season will 
be brought to home plate by. are you 
ready? Rocketman. 

Kinnie Gibson. 29, wearing a 120 
pound rocketbelt, will jet around the in- 
side of the Vet with the first ball . 

To top it all, fans attending the first 
three Chicago games. April 10-11-12. 
will be treated to Calendar Weekend, 
thanks to Snapper Lawn Mowers. 

— from Phillies Phan-o-gram 



E 



I 



3 



Why work for 

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when you could 

earn $8. 00/ hour? 

Work part time as a PACKAGE 
HANDLER for United Parcel 
Service in Willow Grove, PA. 
Choose your starting time: 
1PM, 5PM, 11PM or 4 AM. 

We also have part time open- 
ings for car washers and cler- 
ical personnel. 

Applications are being ac- 
cepted Monday through Fri- 
day, 9 AM to 4 PM at the PA 
State Job Service Office, 471 
E. County Line Rd., Hatboro, 
PA, or call for information, 
443-2835. Equal Opportunity 
Employer, M/R 



-SE- UNITED 
, irfc# U PARCEL 
UUSj SERVICE 




SPORTS' BRIEFS '87 

- 

by John Litzke 

•The wait is over. Lance Parrish, the 
free-agent catcher from Detroit, has 
■signed a one-year $800,000 deal with 
the Philadelphia Phillies with an extra 
$200,000 to come if his back stays 
healthy up to the All-Star break. Par- 
rish's signing gives the Phillies a very 
potent attack with strength and speed 
up and down the lineup. And with a bit 
of pitching, will make a run at the Mets 
in '87. 

• Not to belabor this story but just to 
review for those who may not have 
heard. Ex-Villanova basketball star 
Gary McLain confesses his cocaine ad- 
diction in an article in Sports Illustrated 
which paid McLain $40,000. It turns 
out that McLain had been addicted to 
the drug way before and during 'Nova's 
championship season. McLain reports 
that he had confronted Coach Rollie 
Massimino with the problem but Massi- 
mino denies it. Now there are bad to 
mixed emotions surrounding Gary 
McLain as to whether or not he actually 
spoke with Coach Massimino and 
whether or not he sold the school out 
following the publishing of the $40,000 
article. Villanova. 1 would think, has 
received a slightly tarnished reputation. 
What do you think? If there are any 
thoughts on the Gary McLain story I'd 
like to hear them and publish them. 
Was Gary looking to help himself or 
hurt Villanova? You know. Hollywood 
could get a hold of this story and make 
a mini-series, a book and even a movie 
on this incident with significant profit 
going into McLain's pocket. Why did 
he have to make his problem public 
and not seek treatment on his own? 
And if Massimino knew of his situation, 
then why didn't he help McLain? Gary. 



I think you are trying to pull the 'Cats 
fur over our eyes. If you have an opin- 
ion, please place it on a slip of paper 
with your name and box. 

• Los Angeles Kings star Marcel Dionne 
is traded to the New York Rangers for 
Scott Laidlaw and Mike Ridley. 

• Flyers need to become more consistent 
dropping game last week to the Rang- 
ers (could the Froese trade come back 
to haunt them?) while remaining 17 
points ahead of New York Islanders 
Flyers have clinched a playoff berth 
and are in a race with Edmonton for 
most points which would guarantee 
home ice throughout the playoffs. 

• Sixers, well, they need help. 

• Walton returns to Boston lineup this 
past week following arthroscopic sur- 
gery on his ankle. 

• Laker great Kareem Abdul-Jabbar an- 
nounces his retirement at the end of 
the 1988 season. 

• South Philadelphia H.S. defeats West 
Philadelphia H.S. to take the Public 
League basketball crown while North 
Catholic battled past Roman Catholic 
to take the Catholic League crown. 

• Boxing machine Mike Tyson defeats 
Bone Crusher Smith for the World 
Heavyweight boxing title and is already 
looking to defend his title with the 
challenger being either James "Quick" 
Tillis or Frank Bruno. 

• In a related story, 39-year-old former 
heavyweight champion George Fore- 
man is banned from boxing in Califor- 
nia until he loses weight and gets him- 
self into better shape. George is 267 
lbs. 

• LaSalle. behind Lionel Simmons buz- 
zer beater, drops Villanova out of the 
NIT tourney. As if Rollie didn't have 
enough on his mind already. 

• Wrestlemania coming May 29! Live 
from Detroit but on close circuit at the 
Spectrum. Anyone interested in going 
to the Spectrum should let me know 
'cause I'm dying to go and I don't want 
to go alone. 

• Who's left? You ask! They're down to 
16 and by Thursday (yesterday) it'll be 
eight with the finals March 28-30. 

In th«? Midwest: In the West: 

Indiana/Duke UNLV/Wyoming 

DePaul/LSU Oklahoma/Iowa 

In the Southeast: In the East: 

Georgetown /Kansas N Carolina /Notre Dame 

Providence /Alabama Florida/Syracuse 

Any predictions???? How about North 

Carolina and Indiana in the finals? Or 

North Carolina vs. UNLV? 



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NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home away from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: 12-HorseAle 
Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: $1 Cheesesteak 
Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

Area's Best Lunches 11 AM -3 PM 

Happy Hour 4 ■ 6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 






This Week on + 
Campus 

byW.L. Unger ^ 

FRIDAY, MARCH 20 

Junior Dinner Dance at Highpoint 

7 p,m.-l a.m. + 

SATURDAY, MARCH 21 

Innovator! — Music Concert 

it 

SUNDAY, MARCH 22 

Equestrian Show, 8 a.m. Hosted by 

it 

MONDAY, MARCH 23 

B (HJ vt, Ursinus, 1 p.m 

if 

TUESDAY, MARCH 24 

FILM: "Jagged Edge" 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25 I 

Randy Maugher at Caesar's 9 p.m 

G (HJ w. Kings. 1 p.m * 

B fH) vs. Swarthmore, 3 p.m. 

THURSDAY, MARCH 26 ^ 

Lecture: Dr James Sidle speaks on 
Honey Bee Biology at 8 p.m r 
MandetlU 

SB (A> vs. WiB.3p.m 



m 






BMaKRHMKs^Mltesr ©§>ilfl@g@ 



Vol. XXI. No. 22 
Friday, March 27. 1987 




Quote of the Week 

"I don't want to achieve 

immortality through my work. 

I want to achieve It through 

not dying." - Woody Allen 

• All News Special • 



NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



DVC Exhibit Wins Lots of 

Awards at the Philadelphia 

Flower Show 

Congratulations are in order for the 
many persons involved in obtaining 
DVC's four prestigious awards last week, 
for "Blankets of Beauty" at the Philadel- 
phia Flower Show. Everyone at the 
school is mighty proud of this accom- 
plishment, and we all appreciate the 
hours and hours of hard work that went 
into making DVC well-known through its 
exhibit, viewed by thousands passing 
through the Civic Center. 

1. Pennsylvania Horticulture Society 
Award of Merit for outstanding exhibit, 
educational/academic 

2. Herb Society of America, Philadelphia 
Unit, Award for an outstanding use of 
herbs 

3. Special Achievement Award of the 
Garden Club Federation of Pennsyl- 
vania for an educational exhibit of 
unusual excellence 

4. The Bulkley Medal of the Garden 
Club of America to an exhibit of spe- 
cial merit and/or educational value 
Again, congratulations! 




QUIZ YOURSELF ON 
CURRENT EVENTS . . . 

1 . Identify the speaker and the persons 
referred to in the following statement: 
"As we now know, it turned out they 
were right and I was wrong." 

2. The FDA approved the sale of a new 
drug more quickly than usual. What 
was the drug and what is it for? 

3. Why did the Oslo, Norway, City 
Council ban a Frank Sinatra concert? 

4. One of President Reagan's close 
friends and former aide was indicted. 
Name him and the charge against 
him. 

5. What power is U.S. Attorney General 
Ed Meese considering giving local 
school boards? 

6. A new plan has surfaced to save the 
proposed joint session of Congress in 
Philadelphia to celebrate the Constitu- 
tion Bicentennial. What's this new 
plan? 

7. What big change have Congressional 
investigators of the Iran-Contra scan- 
dal announced? 

8. Which two Democrats have moved 
toward formal declaration that they 
are seeking the Democratic presiden- 
tial nomination? 

9. 1986 Gross National Product figures 
indicate the slowest economic growth 
since the 1982 recession. What was 
last year's growth rate? a) 1.1, b) 2.5, 
c) 2.7 or d) 6.4 percent? 

Source: The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 22, 1987 



Coming Monday, April 13th 
ROOM REGISTRATION FOR '87'88 




Joining in the fun. Dr and Mrs Feldstein Photo Ram Pages 




Room registration is scheduled for 
Monday, April 13th. All registrants will 
report to the AM- Purpose Room (Student 
Center) which will be divided for the men 
and women. The schedule is as follows: 

Class of 88 4:15-5:15 p.m. 

Class of '89 5:30-6:30 p.m. 

Class of '90 7:00-8:30 p.m. 
To be eligible to register for a room 
next year, your advance payment of 
$150.00 must be paid to the Ac- 
counting Office. (The due date was 
Monday, March 16, 1987; check with 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 

INTERVIEWS FOR THE 

WEEK OF MARCH 30 

Monday, March 30 

HEADQUARTERS FARM 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Tuesday, March 31 

U.S. MARINE CORPS 

Dining Hall 10:45 a.m.- 12:45 p.m. 

ROBERT MONTGOMERY 

LANDSCAPING 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

VIGORTONE AGRICULTURAL 

PRODUCTS 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Wednesday, April 1 

TRI-STATE DAIRY & DELI 
CAREER DAY 

At Temple University. Come to place- 
ment office to sign-up. DVC vans will 
leave approximately 10 a.m. will return 
to DVC approximately 5 p.m. 

Thursday, April 2 

NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL LIFE 

INS. CO. 

Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

AMERICAN TREE CARE 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Friday, April 3 

NOR-AM CHEMICAL CO. 
LEHIGH BIO & AG SERVICES 
ROHM & HAAS 

All are for summer internships. Individual 
interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 




DVC junior class dances the night atuay Photo/ Ram Pages 



FOUNDERS' DAY IS 
COMING SOON! 

The annual Founders' Day Convoca- 
tion will be held on Sunday, April 5, 
1987 at 3:30 p.m. in the James Work 
Gymnasium. 

All members of the faculty, administra- 
tion and Board of Trustees will be present 
during this brief convocation. Student 
participation adds a lot to the ceremony, 
and it is important to have good repre- 
sentation on the part of the student 
body. 



Accounting Office NOW if you are un- 
sure of your payment status.) 

The lottery system will be used to 
determine the order of room selection. 
You are required to have a roommate (s) 
prior to selecting your room. No one will 
be able to register for a three or four- 
person room without the full amount of 
people necessary to fill the room. If you 
do not have a roommate, your name will 
be put into a genera! pool and you will be 
assigned a roommate and room after 
the total housing registration is completed. 

Preregistration for 1 987 
Fall Semester Courses 

1. Preregister in Department Chairper- 
son's office or assigned adviser's office 
on the following dates: March 31, 
April 1, 2, 3, 6, 7&8, 1987. 

2. ALL PREREGISTRATION MUST BE 
COMPLETED BY 4 P.M., WED., 
APRIL 8, 1987. 

Preregistration forms will be located in 
each on-campus mail box. Off-campus 
students will pick up preregistration form, 
on table, in post office lobby. Complete 
preregistration form before consulting 
with department chairperson/adviser. 

Listing of 1987-88 fall/spring courses 
are located in lobby of Feldman Agricul- 
ture Building, Mandell Science Building, 
Krauskopf Memorial Library, Student 
Center and dormitory bulletin boards. 

Students planning to attend part-time 
during 1987 fall semester (seven to eleven 
semester credits) must obtain required 
form at Registrar's Office (2nd floor, 
Lasker Hall) before preregistering for 
courses. 

Students planning to take one to six 
semester credits, register in Continuing 
Education Office (2nd floor, Allman 
Building) during July, August 1987. 

• This Week on 
Campus 

* byW.L. Unger 
FRIDAY, MARCH 27 

G (H) vs. Swarthmore, 1 p.m. 

* SATURDAY, MARCH 28 

Senior Dinner Dance at Htghpoint , 

7 p.m.-l a.m. 

* Beekeeping Short Course 
LAC (H) vs. Trenton, 2 p.m. 
BHw. Drew, 1 p.m. 
T (A) vs. Susquehanna 

SUNDAY, MARCH 2* 

Equestrian Show, Wilson College, 

8 a.m. 

rUESDAY. MARCH 31 

Clyde Peeling's Reptile Land, 7:c 
p.m. in the APR 

PreregsfratJon begns. 
SB (H) vs. Upsaia, 2:30 p.m 
B (H) vs. RutgenvCamden. 3 p. 
*Y. AJPRfl.1 

s vs. Cleveland, tickets $6 from 
Talker's office. 



if 



Billboard's 
Top Pop Singles 

WEEK ENDING 3/25/67 

1. "Happy Together," The Turtles 

2. "Dedicated to the One I Lovei" 
Mamas and the Papas 

3. "Penny Lane," Beatles 

4. "There's a Kind of Hush," 
Herman's Hermits 

5. "Baby, I Need Your Lovin\" 
Johnny Rivers 

WEEK ENDING 3/26/77 

l."Rich Girl," Hall and Oates 

2. Love theme from A Star is Born 
("Evergreen"), Barbra Streisand 

3. "Dancing Queen," Abba 

4. "Don't Give Up On Us," David 
Soul 

5. "Don't Leave Me This Way," 
Thelma Houston 

WEEK ENDING 3/21/87 

1. "Lean On Me," Club Nouveau 

2. "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now," 
Starship 

Musical Notes 

On March 6, 7 and 8, California 
University of Pennsylvania hosted Penn- 
sylvania Intercollegiate Band, with Dr. 
Richard Strange as guest conductor. 
Tom Saffell and Bill Benner represented 
DVC in the clarinet section. A total of 
130 musicians participated. 

The DVC Band and Chorale will pre- 
sent their annual Spring Concert on 
Thursday, April 9 at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Student Center APR. Everyone is invited 
to attend and enjoy the music. Admis- 
sion is free and refreshments will be 
served. 



BUNNY DAY AT THE ZOO 

Children under 12 wearing bunny ears 
can hop into the Zoo free on Sunday, 
April 12 for Bunny Day. Special guests 
Mr. & Mrs. Edward T. Bunny will make 
appearances from 12-4 p.m. and hand 
out blue bunny rings to children who 
stop by to say hello. 

Mr. Edward T. will be available at the 
Impala Fountain Cafe to pose with any- 
one who wants to have a special com- 
puter photo taken with him. But for 
those who'd rather snap their own pic- 
tures, Mrs. Bunny will be at the Gazebo 
by the main entrance to smile and say 
cheese. 

Have lunch at the newly-opened Im- 
pala Fountain Cafe and then plan to 
stroll the grounds to see animals all 
geared up for spring — Sunday, April 12 
at the Philadelphia Zoo. 



3. "Let's Wait Awhile," Janet Jackson 

4. "Tonight, Tonight, Tonight," 
Genesis 

5. "Mandolin Rain," Bruce Hornsby & 
The Range 

6. "Somewhere Out There," Linda 
Ronstadt & James Ingram 

7. "Come Go With Me," Expose 

8. "The Final Countdown," Europe 

9. "Don't Dream It's Over," Crowded 
House 

10. "I Knew You Were Waiting," 
Aretha Franklin & George Michael 

TOP ALBUMS 

1. Licensed to III, Beastie Boys 

2. Slippery When Wet, Bon Jovi 

3. The Way It Is, Bruce Hornsby 

4. Graceland, Paul Simon 

5. Invisible Touch, Genesis 

6. Control, Janet Jackson 

7. Life, Love and Pain, Club 
Nouveau 

8. The Final Countdown, Europe 

9. Night Songs, Cinderella 
10. Back in the Highlife, Steve 

Wynwood 

Movies for the Week 

THE BARN -343-2088 

Platoon (R) 
7:15-9:30 

Nightmare on Elm Street III (R) 
7:15-9:15 

Lethal Weapon (R) 
7:15-9:30 

Some Kind of Wonderful (PG-13) 
7:00 - 9:00 

Burglar (R) 
7:30 - 9:30 

ROUTE 309 CINEMA-646-4551 

Nightmare on Elm Street III (R) 
7:15-9:30 

Lethal Weapon (R) 

7:15-9:30 

Mannequin (PG) 

8:00- 10:15 

Witch Board (R) 
8:00- 10:15 

Some Kind of Wonderful (PG-13) 
7:45 - 10:00 

Crocodile Dundee (PG-13) 

7:45 - 10:00 

Burglar (R) 

8:00- 10:15 

Street Smart (R) 
7:45 - 10:00 

ATTENTION WOMEN'S 
VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS 

If you are still interested in purchasing 
a team picture ($2), please see Connie in 
Cooke 108. 




ST. GEORGE'S UNIVERSITY 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



N 



GRENADA 
ST. VINCENT 



V 



Affiliated Hospitals in 

New York Stair 

New Jersey 

United Kingdom 

Approved February 4, 1987 by the New York Stale Education Department for the 

purpose of conducting a clinical clerkship program in Ne* York teaching hospitals. 
St. George's received a similar approval in 1985 from the New Jersey Board of 
Medical Examiners; this establishes St. George's as the only foreign medical school 
with instruction in English that has state-approved campuses in both New York 
and New Jersey. 

Over 700 students have transferred to U.S. medical schools. St. George's has 
graduated over 1,000 physicians: 
They are licensed in 39 states; 

They hold faculty positions in 20 U.S. medical schools -25 r o have been Chief 
Residents in 119 U.S. hospitals (according to a 1986 survey). 
St. George's is entering its second decade of medical education. In the first decade, 
we were cited by The Journal of the American Medical Association (January 1985) 
as ranking number one of all major foreign medical schools in the initial pass rate 
on the ECFMG exam. 

St. George's is one of the few foreign medical schools whose students qualify for 
Guaranteed Student Loans. Our students also qualify for the PLUS/ ALAS loans 
and. under certain conditions, VA loans. St. George's grants a limited number of 
loans and scholarships to entering students. 

For information St. George's University School of Medicine' *^ *■ 

please contact c/o The Foreign Medical School Services Corporation 

the Office of One East Main Street • Bay Shore, New York 1 1706 

Admissions (516) 665-8500 



Conrad/Los Angeles Times 



Inquirer 3/22/87 




PM0O OP AH EXPLODING- &OPMEMOMA, 



College Students' Chance to Protest Arms Race 



On April 2, college students from 
across the country will take action to help 
stop the nuclear arms race. The students 
will participate in the fourth annual Uni- 
versity Lobby to End the Arms Race 
sponsored by United Campuses to Pre- 
vent Nuclear War (UCAM). The lobby 
day is a chance for students and faculty 
nationwide to urge Congress to pass leg- 
islation calling for a Comprehensive Test 
Ban treaty (CTB). 

The Mutual Nuclear Warhead Testing 
Moratorium bill (H.R. 12), now in the 
House of Representatives, was intro- 
duced by Reps. Patricia Schroeder 
(D-CO) and Richard Gephardt (D-MO). 
With a vote likely in early April, the April 
2 Lobby Day can make a real difference. 

UCAM, the only organization devoted 
to building a campus movement to end 
the arms race, holds the annual event to 
teach students effective citizen skills for a 
lifetime of use. 

Lobby Day is more than an opportuni- 
ty to lobby for an end to the arms race. 
The event includes briefings with na- 
tional arms control lobbyists, a march to 



i 



3 



Why work for 

minimum wage 

when you could 

earn $8.00/hour? 

Work part time as a PACKAGE 
HANDLER for United Parcel 
Service in Willow Grove, PA. 
Choose your starting time: 
1 PM, 5PM, 11 PMor4AM. 

We also have part time open- 
ings for car washers and cler- 
ical personnel. 

Applications are being ac- 
cepted Monday through Fri- 
day, 9 AM to 4 PM at the PA 
State Job Service Office, 471 
E. County Line Rd., Hatboro, 
PA, or call for information, 
443-2835. Equal Opportunity 
Employer, M/F. 




the Capitol followed by a rally on the 
Capitol East Side to ban nuclear tests, 
and appointments with participants' 
Congresspersom. 

The students who travel to Washing- 
ton for Lobby Day do make an impres- 
sion on their Congresspersons. Repre- 
sentative Claudine Schneider (R-RI), a 
past Lobby Day speaker, says, "College 
students are one of the greatest un- 
tapped resources of the peace move- 
ment. It's their futures we're talking about 
— so it's heartening to see them show 
their concern by participating in a project 
such as this." 

This year, for the first time, UCAM is 
offering a Leadership Development Pro- 
gram on the day following Lobby Day. 

The cost of participating in the events 
is $10. Housing will be arranged by the 
national office for a nominal fee. The 
registration fee includes a one-year 
membership to UCAM and a subscrip- 
tion to the monthly Network News. 

For further information, contact 
UCAM at 202/543-1505, 220 1 St., NE, 
Room 130, Washington, DC. 20002. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: 12-HorseAle 
Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: $1 Cheesesteak 
Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

/Area's Best Lunches 1 1 AM - 3 PM 

Hoppy Hour 4 - 6:30 PM 

Rt 202 • New Britain, PA 
346-1968 



STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 
Entertainment Editor . Kevin Dickmyer 

Reporters Jerry L. Fritz, 

Connie Hajioannou, 
Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news In the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 




THE GREEN SCENE 
ATDVC 



by Jerry Fritz 

Landscape-Nursery Club 

The Landscape-Nursery Club will hold 
a meeting on March 30. All members are 
asked to attend this meeting. Topics to 
be discussed: A- Day, spring banquet, 
spring garden trips. The meeting is at 6 
p.m. in the Student Center. If you want 
t-shirts or polo shirts bring the money 
now — this will be the final time to order. 

Campus News 

Recently over Spring Break, the 
Grounds Maintenance Crew installed 
metal columns (filled with cement) to 
STOP the vehicle traffic between various 
dorms. The Grounds Department has 
taken many approaches to this problem 
and they know this will put an end to un- 
wanted traffic between the dorms. 

The college's Rock Garden situated 
near the main greenhouses are being 
worked on. If anyone can help out please 
contact Jerry Fritz with the hours avail- 
able to work. Thank you. 

The OH. complex's main walkway 
near the Dwarf Conifer Garden needs 
three things: 

1 . A connecting walkway to the Hillman 
Garden. 

2. A well needed trash bin. 

3. A light. 

We are checking into these various 
projects. 

A special lecture, "Espaliers and Topi- 
ary — Specialized Pruning," by Chris 
Woods, English horticulturist and head 
horticulturist at the Chanticleer Estate, 
will be held Monday, March 30, 8 p.m. 
in Mandell Hall Auditorium. Admission 
is free. 



Garden Day Trips 

The Scott Horticultural Foundation is 
located in Swarthmore, Pa. on Rt. 320 
(Chester Rd.) The admission is free. 

This garden is part of the Swarthmore 
College campus. The Arboretum collec- 
tion has over 5,000 kinds of plants all of 
which are labeled. The best months to 
visit are April and May with more than 
600 kinds of daffodils, 300 varieties of 
azaleas, magnolias, flowering cherries, 
lilacs and tree peonies all in bloom at that 
time. Other areas of interest are the 
wister garden, notable for its woodland 
and rock gardens and the Harry Wood 
Memorial Garden, a contemporary court- 
yard landscaping showpiece. Over 200 
varieties of hollies and 25 species of con- 
ifers are in the James R. Froner Collec- 
tion. This garden is well worth visiting 
especially in mid to late April. 



Landscape Design/ 
Landscape Architecture 

What is the difference between a land- 
scape designer and a landscape architect? 
These two horticultural titles are totally 
different in many aspects. 

The landscape designer uses art and 
nature together through evaluation and 
site planning. Designers work on small 
scales, such as residential homes and 
small landscape projects. Designers are 
often more educated on plant material 
and how they create the total landscape. 

The landscape architect designs for 
large landscaping projects such as indus- 
trial parks, shopping malls and city parks. 
The focus is more on urban planning 
rather than residential planning. Archi- 
tects also supervise grading, construction 
and planting throughout the project. 
Most states now require landscape archi- 
tects to be certified in order to practice 
their trade. This certification is granted 
with two years of graduate studies in 
Landscape Architecture. 

Some colleges and universities that 
have graduate programs in landscape ar- 
chitecture are: Rutgers College, Penn 
State, Harvard, Cornell, University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst and Conway 
School of Landscape Design. 




FACULTY DEVELOPMENT LECTURE IV 




Prunus 'Okame' Tree 
Blooming Now 

by Robert Hays 

Prunus 'Okame,' the okame cherry, 
was selected as the members' dividend 
plant distributed at the Spring Garden 
Festival, May 19, 1985. It was introduced 
into the United States from England by 
the late Dr. Henry Skinner, director of 
the U.S. National Arboretum, during the 
mid 1930's. He collected it in the garden 
of Collingwood Ingram, the noted English 
cherry collector, hybridizer and author of 
the book Ornamental Cherries. 

A hybrid between P. incisa and P. 
campanulata, the okame cherry has car- 
mine-pink flowers which appear anytime 
between the last week of March and the 
first two weeks of April in the Philadel- 
phia area. The flowers are effective for 
approximately seven days. What makes 
this cherry so outstanding is the fact that 
the flowers are preceeded by maroon 
buds and followed by the persistent red 
calyces, extending the effective "flower- 
ing" season to three weeks (as opposed 
to the one-five days of most cherries) . In 
addition to its flowers, the okame cherry 
provides other seasonal interest with its 
yellow-orange fall color and striking 
winter bark. 

The okame cherry is tolerant of a range 
of soil types, but as with most cherries, is 
best planted on a moist, well drained 
soil. Best flowering will occur in full sun, 
although it will tolerate partial shade. The 
newly planted cherry should be watered 
well once weekly during dry spells for at 
least the first growing season. 'Okame' is 
a fast growing cherry and will reach 25 ' . 

As an alternate selection to Prunus 
'Okame,' there is Skimmia reeuesiana. 
Reeves skimmia is a low growing ever- 
green shrub that will reach one-and-a-half 
to two feet in height with a two to three 
foot spread. The fragrant white flowers 
are borne on two to three inch panicles in 
late March and are followed by crimson 
fruits which persist throughout winter. 
Unlike the Japanese skimmia, S. japon- 
ica, Reeves skimmia is bisexual and fruits 
will be produced even on a lone plant. 
Skimmia grows best in moist, well drained 
soil in partial to full shade. 

Happy Gardening! 



EVEN MORE FROM THE 
PHILADELPHIA ZOO . . . 

Four Philadelphia celebrities — Clark 
DeLeon, Thatcher Longstreth, Terry 
Ruggles and Chuck Stone — will be at 
the Zoo on Sunday, March 29 to partici- 
pate in the Zoo's contribution to the city's 
week-long observation of Poetry Week. 
The four will convene on the lawn out- 
side the Carnivore House at 1 p.m. to 
read selected works from the collection 
of poet Marianne Moore. Zoo President 
Bill Donaldson will host the festivities, ac- 
companied by some of the Zoo's smaller 
residents — macaws, cockatoos, chin- 
chilla, skunks, armadillo, snakes and 
owls, all of whom are ardent poetry 
lovers. 

Marianne Moore's works are currently 
featured in an exhibition, "Vision Into 
Verse" at the Rosenbach Museum and 
Library now through April 12. Moore 
was fascinated by zoos and animals, and 
much of her work reflects these subjects. 
Inquirer columnist and KYW-TV person- 
ality Clark DeLeon, City Councilman 
Thatcher Longstreth. WCAU-TV per- 
sonality Terry Ruggles and Daily News 
Senior Editor Chuck Stone will be read- 
ing some of Moore's animal-related 
poems: To A Giraffe, Elephants, The 
Wood weasel. To A Prize Bird, The Lion 
in Love. To A Chameleon and The Bear 
and the Garden Low 

Poetry buffs throughout the area 
should keep Sunday. March 29 in mind 
to see poetic justict done here at the 
Philadelphia Zoo 

Photography Club News 

Thanks to all who came out to this first 
meeting. We have big plans for the rest 
of this semester. Everyone is invited to 
the next meeting on Monday, March 30 
in the Media Center. We're going to 
issue film so bring your dues. 

STUDENT GOVT. 
NEWS 

ELECTIONS COMING UP 
APRIL 15, 1987 

(Petitions due April 13. 
See Dean of Students.) 

CLASS OFFICER ELECTIONS 
APRIL 22, 1987 ' 

(Petitions due April 20. 
See Dean of Students.) 



CULTURAL HAPPENINGS AT DVC 



Walter Conti and the Faculty Development Committee, after Mr Conti spoke on "Technology: Tool for the 
Small Business. " Wednesday. March 4. Photo/Ram Pages 




Dr Richard Ziemer. soloist and Liberal Arts professor, at the Band and Chorale Classical Concert on Wednes- 
day. March 18 Photo/Ram Pages 



DVC PROFESSOR DELIVERS PAPER 
AT NATIONAL CONVENTION 



ATTENTION FISHERMEN and FISHERWOMEN 



Gene Lewis, Chairman of the DVC 
Computer Information Systems Manage- 
ment System, recently delivered a paper 
dealing with computer literacy at a na- 
tional convention. 

Entitled "Computer Literacy: An Al- 
ternative Approach," Lewis' presentation 
explained how a shift from programming- 
based instruction to applications-based 
instruction has resulted in a significant in- 
crease in computer use among students 
at the college. 

Lewis presented his findings at the 
"New Technology and Higher Education. 
Acquisition, Integration and Utilization" 
conference sponsored by the Kansas 
State University as part of its National 
Issues in Higher Education series. The 
conference was held in Orlando, Florida. 

When a computer literacy require- 
ment was implemented at DVC four 
years ago, the initial course outline in- 
cluded a heavy orientation toward pro- 
gramming using the BASIC language on 
a minicomputer. 

"After a year of using this approach, 
several results were observed," said 
Lewis. "First of all, students taking the 
course rarely returned to the computer 
center to use the equipment for other 
course work once the literary require- 
ment was completed. 

"An informal survey of students re- 
vealed a general lack of interest in mak- 
ing use of computer technology if it re- 
quired programming," said Lewis. 

"Instead of turning students on to the 
power of the computer, we had turned 
them off even further," explained the 
professor. "Our first attempt at literacy 
had not had the positive results we had 
originally targeted." 

In an effort to overcome those nega- 
tive feelings toward using the computer, 
Lewis developed a new teaching format 
which concentrated on illustrating several 
contemporary business applications 
using the computer in hands-on situa- 



tions and eliminating the programming 
emphasis. 

The new approach begins with a fun- 
damental definition of the difference be- 
tween hardware and software. Consider- 
able time is spent early in the course 
examining the various hardware com- 
ponents which make up the modern 
computer system. 

Once the main differences are estab- 
lished, contemporary business applica- 
tions are studied. The applications are 
broken down into database manage- 
ment, word processing and spreadsheet, 
with data communications as the ingredi- 
ent linking it all together. 

"We ran one section of students 
through the course," said Lewis. "We 
liked the results. We were able to con- 
vince the administration to institute the 
program across the board." 

Along with the new approach to teach- 
ing computer literacy, Lewis also insti- 
tuted a policy of student critiques to 
monitor reaction to the program. "The 
results of those critiques have shown 
overwhelming support for the concept by 
between 700 and 900 students who 
have gone through the program," he 
said. 

Another proof of the program's suc- 
cess has been a marked increase in the 
number of students using the college's 
computer center for other class work 
related to their major field of study. 

"When we began this approach there 
were virtually no textbooks and no soft- 
ware available to support us," said 
Lewis. "Now the market is flooded with 
both. It shows that we have the right idea 
and approach to this subject." 

Lewis said he was pleased with the 
response he received at the conference. 

"The comments of the educators were 
very positive," said Lewis. "They felt this 
is a unique and innovative approach to 
computer literacy especially coming from 
a college with such a long agricultural 
history." 




Tom Saffel and Banjo Band performing at Caesar's Pub on Thursday, March 19 Photo/ Ram Pages 



Senior Division Task Force 

DVC's Senior Division Task Force is 
searching for new members to assist in a 
project for the college's Continuing Edu- 
cation Senior Division. It has scheduled 
regular meetings for Fridays, 10 a.m. in 
the Student Center, to determine how 
new courses can be developed and 
offered. 

Members of the Task Force should be 
interested in global concerns or in the 
history, literature, culture or politics of 
the nations of the world and how these 
have an impact on our lives. Each Task 
Force participant should also be willing to 
do substantial work as a serious student 
in research, discussion and presentation 
to the group. 

The Task Force is currently developing 
a curriculum to study various aspects of 
one major country, Mexico. The group 
hopes to use this research methodology 
to enable presentation of an on-going 
series of seminars on major nations. 



Looks for New Members 

The goal of the series, which has been 
tagged the "Philosophy Import/ Export 
Company," is to expand international 
understanding. 

The Senior Division operates as a peer 
education "in retirement" adjunct of 
DVC's Continuing Education Division. 
Doylestown resident Edward P. Ander- 
son brought the concept to DVC last fall 
from Harvard University, where he was 
involved in their highly successful pro- 
gram. Peer education involves the course 
facilitator as well as all participants in the 
research/learning experience. 

Currently in its second semester, three 
courses now meet for two hours each 
week: "Personal Computers," "Econom- 
ic Theory for Every Day" and "Thought 
Processes That Shaped the United States 
Constitution." 

To become a member of the Task 
Force for "PIE. ," or for further informa- 
tion, contact the Director of Continuing 
Education, Senior Division, DVC, 215/ 
345-1500. 



With the fishing season just around the 
corner, many of DVC's piscatorial preda- 
tors are starting to show signs of life. This 
year, it seems that there are more of 
them on campus than ever before. A 
group of these individuals recently met 
with Mr. Johnson of the Biology Depart- 
ment with the intent of forming a campus 
club devoted to this hallowed pastime. If 
you are interested in joining, please let 
Mr. Johnson know the next time you see 
him on campus. If the interest is as wide- 
spread as it seems, a formal meeting will 
be scheduled and we'll be off and fishing. 
Plans for the club presently include: 

• local fishing trips (shad and trout sea- 
sons are almost upon us) , 

• possible affiliation with a national orga- 
nization such as Trout Unlimited, 
BASS, etc., 

Northeastern Competition 
Yietds DVC First Piace 

The Northeastern Student Affiliate 
Clubs of the National Animal and Dairy 
Science Organizations held their annual 
fellowship/competition weekend on 
February 13-15 at the University of Con- 
necticut. At this gathering a series of 
competitions take place between partici- 
pating colleges and universities. 

The DVC Block & Bridle Club and 
Dairy Society won first place in overall 
competition. Never before has the col- 
lege achieved this recognition. All partici- 
pants are to be congratulated for their ef- 
forts and contributions to this achieve- 
ment. In a stiff competition, Joanna 
Toenniessen received first place in the 
paper presentation giving an admirable 
speech on the effects of crude protein on 
bovine reproductive efficiency. The judg- 
ing team, consisting of Allison Bakos, 
Rick Lawrence, Mike Moms, Kevin Milz 
and Beth Meny, won second place in a 
competition including the evaluation of 
dairy and beef cattle, hogs, sheep and 
Morgan horses. A second judging team 
and two quiz bowl teams also contributed 
to the college's first place honor in this 
competition of the northeast region. 
These participants were: Debbie Oester- 
ling, Leslie Mueller, Julie Squier, Lisa 
Roerig, Larry High, Shari Reichenbach, 
Mark Hons, George Brandin, Brian Flei- 
sher, Ron Dingle, Bob Briedis and Steve 
Meyers. 

In election of officers Kevin Milz was 
voted the 1987-88 officer-at-large. Ac- 
companying the group for the weekend 
was Mr. Jerry Myers. The affiliate dele 
gation elected Mr. Myers as their Jr. Ad- 
visor for the coming year. 

The group was especially proud of 
these honors, as Dr. Tibor Pelle (former 
Professor and Department Chairman at 
DVC) was instrumental in inspiring the 
concept of the Northeast Student Affiliate. 

Along with their excellent achieve- 
ments and recognition, the group also 
displayed tremendous enthusiasm, spirit 
and integrity. These students should be 
commended for this quality representa- 
tion of DVC. 

LIBRARY BOOK SALE 

WHEN: Thursday, April 9, 1987 
WHERE: Joseph Krauskopf Memorial 
Library 
TIME: 8:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. 

Hardbacks . . 25C Paperbacks . 10C 

All-You-Can-Carry-for-$1.00 
Sale starts at 3 P.M. 

FOR THE BEST BUYS . . . 
COME EARLY!!! 

SPORTS WRAP-UP 

will return next week. 

John Litzke will have 

all sporting events 

back in full force 

in Ram Pages April 3 edition. 



• improvement of fishing conditions in 
Lake Archer, 

• swapping locations of secret fishing 
holes and telling tales of past successes, 

• attending some of the local free fishing 
seminars, 

• renting some of the many fishing vid- 
eos presently available (of course, after 
we rent them we will watch them) . 

These are just some of the ideas that 
have already been suggested. There are 
undoubtedly many more. So if you are 
interested, let Mr. Johnson know some- 
time next week and then check Ram 
Pages for the exact time and place of the 
first meeting. Hope to see you there and 
in the meantime, GOOD FISHING!! 

ANSWERS TO 
CURRENT EVENTS QUIZ 

1. President Reagan, speaking on the 
Iran-Contra scandal, was referring to 
Secretary of State George P. Shultz 
and Secretary of Defense Caspar W. 
Weinberger. 

2. The drug is AZT, called the first treat- 
ment but NOT cure for the AIDS 
syndrome. 

3. Because of a local law banning enter- 
tainers who have performed in South 
Africa. 

4. Former White House aide Michael 
Deaver of California was indicted for 
perjury. 

5. Meese is pressing for the right to re- 
quire urine tests of teachers to deter- 
mine drug use. 

6. A smaller version of the original plan 
calls for 32 senators and 105 repre- 
sentatives to Philadelphia for a mod- 
ern "Constitutional Convention" 
demonstration. 

7. The special House and Senate com- 
mittees investigating the scandal will 
now conduct joint hearings beginning 
May 5. 

8. Massachusetts Governor Michael S. 
Dukakis and the Rev. Jesse Jackson. 

9. b) 2.5 percent GNP is the lowest since 
1982. 

MONEY-FOR-COLLEGE 

by Irving Bender 

College is part of the American dream. 
But what about the nightmare: how 
to pay for it! This column offers some 
answers. 

Q. "I am a black female with a child, 
who needs financial help to get through 
college. I am entering freshman year but 
have not yet decided on my career 
choice." (K.H., Louisville, KY) 

A. Your school counselor will help 
you apply for government grants and 
loans which you are eligible for. Colleges 
also have specific grants for students 
enrolled in that school. 

A third source of financial help for you 
is the private sector. There are awards 
tagged specifically for blacks. Others are 
specifically for women. Many others ap- 
ply to all fields of study, which also apply 
to you since you didn't yet choose a ma- 
jor. There are other factors in your back- 
ground which make you eligible for many 
other financial awards. 

Here is a specific source you are eligi- 
ble for: Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, 
1707 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W., 
Washington, DC. 20009. Apply for 
Undergraduate Award . Open to all areas 
of study. 

How to find out all you are eligible for 
from private sources? This is an enor- 
mous chore which can be shortcut by a 
computer service. For six years National 
Scholarship Research Service has com- 
piled the largest database of private 
source listings in the world, topping $8 
billion. These listings cover UNDER- 
GRADUATE. GRADUATE and OVER- 
SEAS study. 






BMawwMP® WlflfiSf ©Bflllaig© 



Vol. XXI. No. 23 
Friday. April 3. 1987 




Highlights 
6 pages of information: 

On the Town 2 

April Calendar 3 

Wilson Leaves, Wolfgang 
Assumes Athletic Director 
Post 4 



NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 




Is DVC Losing Good Employees? 



DVC President Joshua Feldstein. left, meeting with Pennsylvania State Senator Jim Greenwood in the 
Senator's Doylestown office Dr Feldstein was thanking Greenwood for his help in securing a $75,000 grant to 
he used for the purchase of scientific equipment for DVC Photo/ Ram Pages 



IT WAS STUDENTS 
AGAINST TEACHERS . . . 

by Karen Doyle and Ann Whitesell 

Who says there's nothing to do at 
DVC? On March 24. faculty members 
and students of the college competed 
head to head in the Faculty vs. Students 
Volleyball Game. Needless to say. the 
students won the tournament The teach- 
ers put up a good fight. 

The results— Game One: Students 
15, Faculty 2: Game Two: Faculty 15. 
Students 3: Game Three: Students 15. 
Faculty 7: Game Four: Students 15. 
Faculty 14. 

After the tournament, students and 
teachers alike indulged in liquid refresh- 
ments and pizza. Students noted that 
socializing with the professors was a great 
way to get to know them as people. 

By the way, there was one injury re- 
ported, but other than that, everyone 
had a great time. Karen Doyle, organizer 
of this event, said. "Let's do it again!" 




Dr James Sidie. Associate Professor of Biology at 
Ursinus College, begins talk on "The Biology of the 
Honeybee." at the joint meeting of Beekeepers 
held Thursday. March 26 in Mandell 114 
Photo /Ram Pages 



QUIZ YOURSELF ON 
CURRENT EVENTS . . . 

1 . Who said the following and what were 
the circumstances: "I haven't seen 
him in years, and I don't care what 
they do to him. They can go hang 
him if they want. I'll go and pull the 
rope." 

2. Philadelphia's Constitution Bicenten- 
nial celebration suffered another blow 
when this corporation dropped its in- 
tention to contribute about $2 million. 
Name the company. 

3. Who recently spoke these words: 
Arms sales to Iran "sort of settled 
down to just trading arms for hostages 
. . . And that's a little like paying ran- 
som to a kidnapper. If you do it. then 
the kidnapper's just encouraged to go 
kidnap someone else." 

4. The U.S. Supreme Court issued what 
major affirmative-action ruling? 

5. A NASA mission ended with the ex- 
plosion of an Atlas-Centaur rocket 
carrying a military communications 
satellite. Why did critics immediately 
criticize NASA? 



Dear Editor, 

My reason for terminating my employ- 
ment at DVC is because I found a better 
paying job that is closer to home. I really 
regret leaving. I have only been here 
about eight months, but felt I found a 
home with my co-workers in the House- 
keeping Department and with my girls in 
the dorm. 

The Housekeeping Department works 
very hard for the little reward they get. 
Some may ask, "Why are you doing that 
kind of work?" but I felt proud because of 
working with such a group and having 
two floors of girls that I cared about and 
wanted to do my best for. I feel I have 
given my best to both groups and, in 
return, they have given to me. 



All we hear about is the vandalism that 
goes on around here, and there is plenty 
of that. It's time someone hears about 
the good kids. 

It's just too bad that people like myself 
find a job they like and have to quit be- 
cause they know there is no future here 
as far as getting much of a raise. I have 
been here almost eight months, and all I 
hear is "no raise." or very little in July. 
You can't get, or hold onto, good people 
that way. You get a person like myself 
who wants to stay here, but is forced to 
leave because of no raises or a token 



raise. 



Sincerely. 
Jane Strope 
Housekeeping Dept. 



FACULTY DEVELOPMENT HIGHLIGHTS 



GUEST LECTURES 

Drs. Miller and Palumbo have invited 
a series of guest speakers for their com- 
bined Determinative Microbiology and 
Food Microbiology classes. Interested 
members of the faculty and student body 
are welcome to attend. 

Tuesday. April 7, 6th period. Ms. Mary 
Getz. Bactomatic, Inc.. "Impedance 
Methods in Microbiology" 

Tuesday. April 21. 6th period. Dr. 
Michael Haas, A.R.S.-E.R.R.C, 
"USD. A. Biotechnology in the 
Food and Pharmaceutical Industry" 



Tuesday. April 28, 6th period. Dr. 
James Smith, E.R.R.C, U.S.D.A., 
"Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent 
Assay Methods for Detecting 
Microorganisms or Their Toxins" 

SHORT COURSE ON CAMPUS 

The Food Industry and Business Ad- 
ministration Departments are running a 
training course for food plant sanitation 
managers in cooperation with Henkel 
Corp., Chemical Services Division. 
Forty-four people have registered for the 
course, which is to run April 6-8 in the 
Student Center. 



6. The man whose best-remembered 
statement was that he was in charge 
("I'm in charge here . . ."), declared 
his candidacy for an office which 
would definitely put him in charge! 
Explain. 

7. The largest new offering of stock in 
U.S. history was greeted enthusiasti- 
cally on Wall St. Who's the company? 

Source: The Philadelphia Inquirer. March 29, 1987 




This Week on 
Campus 

W.L Unger 

FRIDAY, APRIL 3 

Student Government hosts Banquc 
if the Cock 'n Bull 

G (A) vs, Wesley, 1 p.m. 

SATURDAY. APRIL 4 

"* Beekeeping Short Course continues 

Listen to Bucks County Symphony. 7 
p.m. in the APR 

* SUNDAY. APRIL 5 

Come to Founders' Day at DVC! See 
classmates get honors at 3:30 p.m. in 
"to 

MONDAY. APRIL 6 

AHens come to the APR at 9 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8 

No classes due to Find Preregistration 
*f unti!4p.m ^ 

Caesar's Pub, scheduled to celebrate 
preregistration? 9 p.m. 

* Lecture: "Technology in U.S. ^ 
Agriculture." 7 p.m. in the APR 

THURSDAY, APRIL 9 

* Band and Chorale Concert Celebrates * 
Spring! 7.30 p m In the APR 

BOOK SALE! Krauskopi Library. 8 
if a.m. -10 p.m. it 



• 



Dr Bob Berthold. DVC Entomologist/ Apiarist/Teacher, accepts gift from the Beekeepers Association at the 
joint meeting of the Bucks and Montgomery County Beekeepers Is that a new beehive? Photo/ Ram Pages 




ON THE TOWN 

A GUIDE TO WHAT'S HAPPENING IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 

by Kevin Dickmyer 

BEASTIE BOYS BRING 
UNIQUE BRAND OF MUSIC 

The Beastie Boys will bring their spe- 
cial combination of rap and rock music to 
The Spectrum Theatre for one power- 
packed concert on Tuesday, April 7 at 
7:30 p.m. 

Tickets at $14.50 and $15.50 for re- 
served seats, $15.50 for general admis- 
sion on the day of the show, are on sale 
at The Spectrum box office and all 
Ticketron locations, including Showcase 
stores in the Delaware Valley. Tickets 
can also be charged by phone by calling 
Teletron at 1-800-233-4050. 

The talented trio is currently riding 
on the music scene with their debut 
album, "Licensed To III," which remains 
No. 1 on the charts, and their hit single 
"Fight For Your Right," which is still in 
the Top 20 on the singles charts. 

Band members King Ad-Rock (Adam 
Horvitz) , MCA (Adam Yauch) and Mike 
D (Michael Diamond) , have produced a 
rap sound that draws a diversified audi- 
ence of both rhythm and blues, and rock 
fans. 

"The Beasties music combines a rock- 
ers love of band guitars with a rappers 
love of rhymes and the love of both for 

Movies for the Week 

THE BARN -343-2088 

Platoon (R) 

7:30-9:55 

Nightmare on Elm Street 111 (R) 

7:45 - 9:55 

Lethal Weapon (R) 
7:15-9:30 

Some Kind of Wonderful (PG-13) 
7:15-9:30 

Burglar (R) 
7:15-9:30 




ROUTE 309 CINEMA-646-4551 

Nightmare on Elm Street III (R) 
7:00-9:15 

Lethal Weapon (R) 
7:15-9:30 

Mannequin (PG) 

8:00 - 10:15 
Witch Board (R) 

8:00- 10:15- 

Some Kind of Wonderful (PG-13) 
7:00-9:15 

Crocodile Dundee (PG-13) 
7:30 - 9:45 

Burglar (R) 
8:00- 10:15 
Tin Men (R) 
7:30 - 10:00 

Hannah & Her Sisters (R) 
7:30 - 9:45 



The Beastie Boys. Picture courtesy Tim Ragan 

hard funky beats," says a record com- 
pany executive. 

Since the group's inception in 1981, 
the Beastie Boys have opened for both 
Madonna and Run D.M.C. They made 
their acting debut in the 1985 rap movie 
Krush Groove, and will appear in the up- 
coming movie. Tougher Than Leather. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 
AT PULSATIONS 

Baltimore Pike, U.S. 1 
Glen Mills, PA 19342 

SUGAR RAY LEONARD vs. MAR- 
VELOUS MARVIN HAGLER live via 
satellite on Monday, April 6. Doors open 
8 p.m. Boxing begins at 9 p.m. Tickets 
are $35 and are available at Pulsations' 
box office. Must be 21 or older with proof 
of age. For more information call 215/ 
459-4140. 

CYRE sings her smash hit "Last 
Chance" during 98 WCAU-FM'S "FRI- 
DAY NIGHT LIVE.' April 24 Doors 
open 9:30 p.m. Live broadcast from 10 
p.m. until 2 a.m. $5 cover charge, free 
admission for the first 298 people. For 
more information call 215/ 459-4140. 




Personal 



PHILADELPHIA ZOO 
CALENDAR OF EVENTS 



To Student Government, Attention 
Anthony: "Ask not what the American 
flag can do for your classroom, but ask 
what your classroom can do for the 
American flag." — Your editing crew 

STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Bill Rein 

Sports Editor John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 
Entertainment Editor Kevin Dickmyer 

Reporters Jerry L. Fritz, 

Connie Hajioannou, 
Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors Anne Shobert, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news in the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 



April 12 


Bunny Day at the Zoo 




Camel Rides 


May 2-3 


30th Anniversary of 




Children's Zoo Party. 




Grand Opening of 




Pelican Exhibit. 


June 6-7 


World of Primates First 




Anniversary Party 


June 11 


Zoobilee 


June 17 


Razzle Dazzle/Zoofari 




Children's Party 


June 27-28 


Great American Teddy 




Bear Rally VI 


Aug. 22-23 


Dog Days of August at 




the Zoo 


Oct. 10 


ADOPT (Animals 




Depend on People 




Too) Day 


Oct. 31-Nov 1 


Halloween Harvest 




Festival 


Nov 1 


Run Wild at the Zoo 


Nov. 27-29 


Holiday Festival 


Dec. 13 


Chanukah Festival 



THE GREEN SCENE 
ATDVC 

by Jerry L. Fritz 

Landscaping = An Investment 
A tree in your yard may be like money 
in the bank. That's a conclusion to be 
drawn from a number of studies con- 
ducted by real estate groups, the nursery 
industries and the U.S. Forest Service. 
These studies found that a well-land- 
scaped home will sell for as much as 20 
percent more than a similar house with- 
out trees, shrubs, plants and a healthy 
lawn. Also, the house will sell more easily 
and faster. In about 200 examples, it was 
found that a home with an abundance of 
trees had a much greater sales appeal 
than others. It is good to know, says the 
American Association of Nurserymen, 
that landscape plantings increase in their 
value as they grow through the years, 
and increase the value of the property 
where they are. It's hard to name many 
home purchases that don't depreciate in- 
stead . . . and add so much to the beauty 
of your home surroundings. 

Campus News 

Mr. Rick Ray and his work-study stu- 
dents hiked to New Jersey to dig and 
bring back two shrubs for our campus. 

The two shrubs are Juniperus rigida 
and Torreva californica. These two 
plants are now in the college's nursery 
waiting to be planted. Thanks goes to 
Mr. Ray for locating and getting these 
plants. 

What's Blooming? 

Some trees and shrubs blooming on 
campus are: 

1. Dwarf forsythia near Lasker Hall. 

2. Cornus mas near Lasker Hall and the 
Student Center. 



3. Okame cherry in the Hillman Garden. 

4. Daffodils in the Woodland Garden, 
behing Ag. Bldg., Student Center 

5. Japanese andromeda mainly near the 
Library. 

6. Magnolias at the field hockey field. 

A Special Garden 

One of my favorite gardens is right 
here on our campus. The Woodland 
Garden which is located between the 
Horticulture Building and the Ornamen- 
tal Horticulture Complex. This garden 
now has many spring bulbs in bloom, i.e. 
snowbells, daffodils, crows, spring 
beauties and grape hyacinths. 

The garden reaches its blooming peak 
at the end of April to early May. Many 
azaleas and rhododendrons and wood- 
land perennials make this garden very 
visually pleasing. 

Some trees that exist in our woodland 
garden are tall beech trees, black and 
white oak (covered with English ivy), a 
national champion sassafras tree, which 
is over 200 years old. This garden, to 
me. is a neglected garden on campus. 
So try to see what you're missing. It's a 
great spot to study. 

Club News 

The Landscape-Nursery Club will hold 
a Campus Clean Up on April 8 (preregis- 
tration day) . We will meet behind Elson 
in the parking lot. Everyone welcome. 
Let's get our campus looking great! Hope 
to see you there! 

The Landscape- Nursery Club will 
have a spring garden trip to Winterthur 
Gardens in Winterthur. Delaware. This 
trip will take place on May 5 (reading 
day). The cost of the trip is not yet set. 
More information will follow on this mat- 
ter soon! 

Pi Alpha Xi will have a joint club ban- 
quet with the Horticulture Club later in 
the month. 

Off-Campus Happenings 

This Saturday, April 4 the college will 
be heading to the annual Middle Atlantic 
Field Day held at Temple (Ambler cam- 
pus). If interested in competing, please 
contact Dr. Martin. Spectators and fans 
to help cheer on the college are also 
welcome. 



Financial Aid Information 



MONEY-FOR-COLLEGE 

by Irving Bender 

Q. "I want to attend college but I can't 
afford it. I am a 31 -year-old woman with 
two children in grade school. My hus- 
band works at a steady job. However, 
we have so many liabilities and expenses 
that we can't afford my college costs 
without help." (E.S., Kentucky) 

A. Here is a private source award you 
are eligible for based on your field of 
study: ARTHUR ASHLEY WILLIAMS 
FOUNDATION (scholarships), P.O. Box 
665, Framingham, MA 01701. Awards: 
$1,500 deadline: February 1; May 1; 
August 1; November 1. All areas of 
study. Awarded to students based on 
need and prior accomplishments. Must 
be U.S. citizen. For full time undergradu- 
ate study only. Contact Frederick Cole, 
Chairman, address above. 

You can tap the world's largest com- 
puterized database of private award 
sources: over 200,000 listings covering 
UNDERGRADUATE, GRADUATE and 
OVERSEAS study. For free details, 
write: Financial Aid Finders, 77 Gristmill 
Road, Randolph, NJ 07869. Or call 
TOLL-FREE 800-992-0424 (from NJ: 
201-361-2567). 




$12,000 AVAILABLE 
IN GRANTS 

Students considering careers in the 
harness horse industry may be eligible for 
grants totaling $12,000 from the Har- 
ness Horse Youth Foundation. 

Grants will be awarded on the basis of 
desire for a career in the standardbred in- 
dustry, need and academic excellence. 
Serious consideration will be given to ap- 
plicants already enrolled in a post-high 
school course related to equine studies. 

These grants to be awarded for the 
87-88 school year have been made pos- 
sible by contributions to memorial funds 
established in the memory of Francis 
McKinzie and the Critchfield-Oviatt fami- 
lies and also by funds raised through the 
Foundation's annual Stallion Service 
Auction. 

Designed to assist young people seek- 
ing careers in harness racing, this scholar- 
ship program represents just one of the 
Foundation's activities. In addition to the 
scholarship grants, the Foundation also 
sponsors a camp program, assists 4-H 
harness clubs and offers internships. 

Applications for scholarships may be 
obtained from the Harness Horse Youth 
Foundation, 6320 Busch Boulevard. 
Columbus, OH 43229. Telephone 614/ 
846-1776. Deadline for filing applica- 
tions has been set for July 1, 1987. Win- 
ners will be announced on August 1, 
1987. 




po^ 




fc^A^-UP 



AL WILSON EXITS; 
WOLFGANG ASSUMES A.D. POST 



by John Litzke 



v 






- 


. . 




i 1 





COMING 




SPORTS' BRIEFS *87 

by John Litzke 

• Pitcher Joe Cowley becomes newest 
member of the Phillies following trade 
that sent leftfielder Gary Redus to the 
ChiSox. 

• LaSalle , looking for its first NIT Crown 
since the days of Tom Gola, fall to 
Southern Mississippi in the final 84-80. 

• Hagler vs. Leonard. April 6. 1987. 
Should be a war. 

• Flyers clinch Playoff berth, and should 
clinch Patrick Division title which would 
mean home ice throughout the Playoffs. 
Flyers hurting, physically. 

• University of Tennessee captures 
women's NCAA Basketball Champion- 
ship with a 87-44 victory over Louisiana 
Tech. 

• Steve Carlton, trying to make a come- 
back with the Phils, is cut. Later Steve. 

• 1986 Cy Young Award Winner Roger 
Clemens rejects final offer from Boston 
as Red Sox plan to open season with- 
out him. 

• NY Giants raise ticket prices by $3 
from $18 to $21. The price of fame. 

• Sixer guard Maurice Cheeks out two 
weeks at least following finger injury. 
Doc returns to bid Boston farewell and 
scores 28 in Boston's 18-point win 
which puts Sixers 13 games back. For- 
ward Cliff Robinson out as well. 

• Golden State forward Chris Washburn 
returns to team after spending six 
weeks in drug rehab, clinic. 

• Indiana Pacers looking real tough as 
Playoff time nears. 

• Los Angeles Raiders seriously looking 
at old friend Ron Jaworski. 

• Michael Spinks-Gerry Cooney fight set 
for June in Atlantic City. 

• Indiana and Bobby Knight squeeze by 
Syracuse and Jim Boeheim 74-73 to 
take the NCAA National Basketball 
Championship. 



After 11 years as the DVC Football 
Coach and Athletic Director, Al Wilson 
has resigned, effective April 15, 1987. 

In 1986, Wilson accepted the head 
position of FAD, Footballers Against 
Drugs, which was formed to help fight 
drug abuse in football as well as in all 
sports, and to teach the grade school, 
junior high and senior high athletes the 
evils of drugs and their abuse. 

With his resignation being accepted by 
President Joshua Feldstein. Wilson will 
now take the position of Executive Direc- 




Do K K.P.W., Daily and Jelly find this man an ap- 
propriate hockey sex symbol? 

K.K.P.W. 1987 

Women's Intramural 

Floor Hockey Champs! 

In playoff games, K.K.P.W. defeated 
Dairy in triple overtime with a score of 
4-3. They also took a forfeit from Berk 
1st. 

Then the championship game — 
K.K.P.W. vs. Jelly. It was a great offen- 
sive and defensive game by both teams. 
K.K.P.W. won the game by a score of 
8-7. Stacy Yoder and Tammy Petraskie 
were lone scorers for K.K.P.W. each 
with four goals. 

Way to go. K.K.P.W! 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home away from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: 12-HorseAle 
Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: $1 Cheesesteak 

Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

Area's Best Lunches 1 1 AM - 3 PM 

Happy Hour 4 ■ 6:30 PM 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



tor of FAD with the program's home 
base being the Maxwell Football Club in 
Philadelphia. 

Effective immediately, Frank Wolf- 
gang becomes the new Chairman of the 
Division of Physical Education and Ath- 
letics and Director of Athletics after serv- 
ing under Wilson as his assistant for 
many years. 

Congratulations to both men on their 
new positions and best of luck from Ram 
Pages and the students of DVC. 




GOING 



Cross Country Celebrates '86 Season 



The men's and women's cross country 
teams recently held their annual awards 
banquet. The banquet took place in the 
social hall of the New Britain Baptist 
Church. Besides team members, a few 
other guests were invited. These guests 
included: Dr. Miller, Mr. Archer, and a 
few college students. These people were 
invited because of their help during the 
Turkey Trot. The meal itself was served 
in a family-style fashion and was excel- 
lently prepared. 

After the meal was over, Coach Bert- 
hold began to comment on both the 
men's and women's seasons. He also 
began to recognize the letters were 
awarded to Jim Enoch, Tony Donofrio, 
Garry Kampmeyer, John Thomson, and 
David Sports. David Spotts also received 
the MVP for the 1986 season. The final 
record for the men's team was 5-6. 

The lady's letters went to Kathy Lunova, 
Deanna Smith. Kim Finer, Monica Etz- 



weiler, and Trish Morzitz. Trish was also 
announced as MVP for the 1986 season. 
The girls' record ended up as 4-3. 

Captains for the 1987 season were also 
announced at the banquet. The men's 
captain for the '87 season is Garry Kamp- 
meyer with Jim Enoch as co-captain. 
The lady's captain is Trish Morzitz with 
Kim Finer choosen as co-captain. 

Letters were not the only thing awarded 
at this banquet. Each year Dr. Berthold 
hands out special awards which charac- 
terize the actions of a specific individual 
during the season. These awards are 
usually humerous in nature and have 
some type of story behind them. 

The evening was cut short because of 
students having to get back for night class. 
However, before things were ended, 
both the men's and women's teams ex- 
pressed their appreciation to Dr. Berthold 
and the assistant coach by presenting a 
gift to each one of them. 





ATTENTION ALL 

INTRAMURAL SOFTBALL 

TEAMS, PLAYERS 

& CAPTAINS 

Have your game in Ram Pages. All 
you need to do is put the teams that 
clashed, the final score, the team records 
and any highlights, homers, sparkling 
defensive plays, no-hitters, four for four's, 
stolen bases and anything worth noting 
on a piece of paper and place it in Box 
951 Have a MVP season. 




Delaware Valley College 



1987 



APRIL 



1987 




Sunday 



5 



FOUNDERS' DAY 

(Awards Ceremony) 

3:30 p.m. • Gym 
All students are invited! 



12 



PALM SUNDAY 

Equestrian Team 

at Penn State 

8 a.m. 

LAC/Masters of Phila./H/2 p.m. 



19 



EASTER SUNDAY 




Monday 




6 



Movie: 

Aliens 

9 p.m. • APR 



Introducing... 



G/Swarthmore. Ursinus. Moravian, 
Widener & Albright/H/1 p m 



13 



Housing Registration 

APR 
Class of 88 •4:15-5:15 p.m. 
Class of 89 • 5:30-6:30 p.m. 
Class of 90 • 7:00-8:30 p.m. 



Tuesday 



Preregistration 
Continues 

BB/Wilkes/A/1 p.m. 
SB/Kings/ A/2 p.m. dbl. header 



14 



PASSOVER 

BLOODMOBILE 

12-5 p.m. • APR 

Ray Owen performs 

in Caesar's 

9-11 p.m. 



20 



Equestrian Team 
Regionals 



26 



A-Dayl 



LAC/Trenton/H/2p.m 



Classes Resume 8:30 a.m. 



Crocodile Dundee 

9 p.m. • APR 

G/Lebanon & Widener/H/1 p.m. 



27 



NO CLASSES 





21 



SB/Scranton/A/2:30 p.m. 
ight/H/3:15p.m. 




Follow Friday Schedule 



Campus Film: 

The River 

9 p.m. • APR 




Wednesday 



DVC AT THE VET 

Sixers vs. Cleveland 

The Money Pit 

9 p.m. • APR 

SB/Widener/H/4 p.m. 
LAC/Academy of New Church/ 
A/4 p.m. 



8 



NO CLASSES 
Final Preregistration 
Caesar's Pub • 9 p.m. 

Lecture • APR • 7 p.m. 

Topic: Tech. in U.S. Agri 

T/Moravian/H/3:30 p m 
G/Ursinus&FDU/H/l p.m. 



15 



Student Government 
Elections 

9:45 a.m. • Ag. Bldg. 
Brazil • 9 p.m. -APR 

LAC/Academy/H/4 p.m 
T/Ursinus & Haverford/A/330 p.m. 
BB/Muhlenberg/H/3 p.m. 
SB/Moravian/H/4 p.m 



22 



Class Elections • Ag. Bldg. 

Mandatory Senior Class 
Meeting • 3:30 p.m. • APR 

Singer John Vally 

9-11 p.m. • APR 

G/Scranton & Moravian/A/ 1 p.m. 
LAC/Ursinus/H/4 p m 



29 



EX4M 
$Nl)t IN 



fiYHjrti 



Att »tl fUMft m 
9H.au coati lwm& 

udcvi mi* * %■ . 




Thursday 



2 



COMEDY NIGHT 

Featuring 3 Comedians 

9 p.m. • Caesar's Pub 
Preregistration Continues 



9 



Band & Chorale 
Spring Concert 

7:30 p.m. • APR 

SB/FDU/A/2:30 p.m. dbl header 
BB/Albright/A/3 p.m. 




G/Muhlenberg/H/1:30 p.m. 



23 




Friday 



3 



Student Government 

Banquet at 

Cock 'n Bull 

G/Wesley/A/l p.m. 



10 




Saturday 



Beekeeping Short Course 

Bucks County 

Symphony 

7 p.m. • APR 

T/Swarthmore & Widener/H/1 p.m 
BB/FDU/H/1 p.m. dbl. header 
LAC/Temple/A 
SB/Muhlenberg/A/1 p m dbl header 



11 



17 



GOOD FRIDAY 

NO CLASSES 

Have a good weekend! 



24 f?|p 




:lass 



BB/Washington/H/l p.m. 

dbl header 



30 



CAESAR'S PUB 

9 p.m. 



T/Penn Relays/ A 



Beekeeping 
Short Course 

BB/Kings/A/l p.m. dbl header 
T/Lycoming/H/1 p.m. 



18 




T/Rutgers Relays/A 
BB/Upsala/A/1 p.m. dbl header 



25 



A-Day! 




BB/Scranton/A/1 p.m. dbl header 

SB/Phila. Textile/H/1 p.m. 
T/Penn Relays/A 
T/Millersville Invitational/A 




BB 

SB 

LAC 

T 

G 



Baseball 
Softball 
Lacrosse 
Spring Track 
Golf 



GOLD SPARKLES IN FIRST ANNUAL ALL-STAR CLASSIC; 

STERLING, McNULTY HONORED 



by John Litzke 

The stars came out last week in the 
first annual DVC Green and Gold Men's 
Intramural All Star Basketball Classic 
and powered by MVP, Paul Sterling's 23 
and "Daddy" Keich's 18, the Gold all- 
stars finished off the Green all-stars 
84-82, in a sparkling contest that went 
down to the final seconds. It was a fast- 
paced first half with very few stoppages 
and both sides gunning up the three 
pointers of which 13 were made between 
the two. 

The Green, led by Coach of the Year 
and Coach of Champion EMO, Pat Mc- 
Nulty and assistant Vince Bedesem, took 
the early lead but midway through the 
half Coach Dudley and the Gold stormed 
back to take as much as a seven point 
lead at 30-23 with time running out in 
the first half. Blue Demons all-star guard 
Paul Sterling helped power the come- 
back as did Don Zecchino of the Terps 
and "Daddy" Keich of Double Stuff. 

The half ended with the score, Gold 
42, Green 41 and the possibility of a 
barnburner loomed in a great way. The 
Green received balanced scoring all 
through the lineup as Gargoyle sharp- 
shooter Doug Herring led the Green with 
eight points including two three-pointers 
while Dan Courts, Bill Boyle and Sean 
Smith each contributed six. 



E 



I 



3 



Why work for 

minimum wage 

when you could 

earn $8.00/hour? 

Work part time as a PACKAGE 
HANDLER for United Parcel 
Service in Willow Grove, PA. 
Choose your starting time: 
1 PM, 5PM, 11 PM or 4 AM. 

We also have part time open- 
ings for car washers and cler- 
ical personnel. 

Applications are being ac- 
cepted Monday through Fri- 
day, 9 AM to 4 PM at the PA 
State Job Service Office, 471 
E. County Line Rd., Hatboro, 
PA, or call for information, 
443-2835. Equal Opportunity 
Employer, M/F. 




On the Gold side, Sterling sparkled 
with 15, Don Zecchino adding 10 and 
Keich with nine. 

The second half was much of the 
same as, once again, the Gold outscored 
the Green 42-41, ending in the 84-82 





TENNIS AT DVC 

Tennis club to hold meeting on Mon- 
day. April 6, 1987 at 4:15 p.m. in the 
student center lobby. ALL who want to 
play tennis and get a club started, please 
attend. 

Thank you. Jerry Fritz 



Don't just come down 

to Atlantic City. 
Come up to Caesars. 

ATLANTIC CITY TRIP TO CAESARS CASINO 

Sponsored by Delaware Valley College Republicans and Business Club 

DATE: FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 1987 

TIME: LEAVES AT 6 P.M. FROM DVC TO CAESARS CASINO WITH 
A FOUR HOUR MINIMAL STAY 

COST: $12.50 WHICH WILL BE REFUNDED UPON ARRIVAL IN 
COINS AND DEFERRED VOUCHERS 

NOTE: MUST BE 21 OR OLDER 

FREE REFRESHMENTS ON THE BUS 

IF INTERESTED PLEASE SUBMIT NAME, BOX NUMBER AND 
$5.00 DEPOSIT TO BOX 222 OR PHONE 340-1046. 

_1AHABJ_ 



ATLANTIC 



CITY 



Gold win. Guard Rich Simononis of in- 
tramural champion EMO, made things a 
little hairy at the end because, with just 
:02 remaining and the ball in the Green's 
hands, Simononis put up a desperation 
three-quarter court shot which banked 
off the backboard and off the front of the 
rim which could've tied it at the buzzer 
and sent the game into overtime. 

Sterling led all scorers with 23 while 
Kiki added 18 and Zecchino 1 1 for the 
victors. The Green, who are by no means 
losers at all, were powered by Dan 
Courts with 13, Bill Boyle with 11 and 
Seamus McGlone, Clay Butterworth and 
Eric Schade with 10 apiece. 

At the half, we had the first official 
Ram Pages hit-the-three-point-shot-and- 
win-an-Aggie-burger shoot off and I am 
proud to announce that we did have a 
winner. Of the five who shot, Tracy Mur- 
ray was the only one to hit the 19 foot 
"J f ' and for her effort she will receive a 
coupon for a free Aggie burger, Pepsi 
and fries from Caesar's Pub compliments 
of Ram Pages and Steve Kline. 

This, being my last year to conduct the 
intramural basketball competition, I 
would like to thank all those who partici- 
pated for three years of exciting basket- 
ball. I would also like to thank all the refs 
who came out and helped and special 
thanks to Michele Dobbs, Gene Bloem- 



ker and Doug Spencer for your help 
keeping score and time. Thanks a lot!!!! 

GOLD 84 

NAME FG FT FTA PTS 3-PT FOULS 

Keich 8 1 2 18 1 2 

Sterling 11 23 1 3 

Gilbert 2 4 

Reaver 12 2 4 2 

Nolan 3 6 3 

Treffinger 2 4 2 

Vinitsky 4 

Lewandowski 2 5 1 

Wisenberg 10 3 1 2 

Zecchino 4 1 3 11 2 1 

Zendt 3 6 1 

Total* 37 4 7 84 6 20 

GREEN 82 

NAME FG FT FTA PTS 3-PT FOULS 

Simononis 3 4 3 1 

Smith 4 12 9 1 

Courts 6 13 1 

McGlone 3 4 6 10 1 

Moran 2 3 

Boyle 4 11 3 

Leinbach 2 2 5 6 

Butterworth 3 3 4 10 1 1 

Schade 4 2 4 10 2 

Herring 3 8 2 

Boltz 2 3 2 1 

Total* 29 17 30 82 7 10 

COACHES-Green: McNuky. Bedesem 

Gold: Dudley 
REFEREES: Estep, C. Boyle. Ford 
TIMEKEEPER: J. Litzke 
SCORERS: M Dobbs, D. Spencer 
ANNOUNCER Darryi "Doesn't Get 
Enough Credit" f hison 



DVC IS RESERVE 

CHAMPION AT FIRST 

EQUESTRIAN SHOW 

OF SPRING 




On March 8th, the DVC Equestrian 
Team competed at their first horse show 
of the spring semester. This was hosted 
by the University of Delaware. The results 
are as follows: 

Beginner Walk-Trot-Canter 
Debbie Oesterling — 2nd 

Laura Harmer — 6th 

Janice Bethman — 2nd 

Joanna Toenniessen — 6th 

Advanced Walk-Trot-Canter 

Donna Forte — 2nd 

P.J. Guyre - 6th 

Julie Glombiak — 5th 

Mark Hayes — 5th 

Novice Flat 

Marybeth Polek — 4th 

Intermediate Flat 

Theresa Kothstein — 5th 

Melanie O'Neill - 4th 

Lori McCutcheon — 5th 

Open Hat 

Darlene Cemohorsky — 6th 
Leslie Ward — 3rd 
Beth Meny — 6th 
Tony Delise — 1st 

Novice Fences 

Marybeth Polek — 6th 

Intermediate Fences 

Melanie O'Neill - 2nd 
Lori McCutcheon — 5th 

Beth Meny — 1st 
Theresa Kothstein — 4th 

Open Fences 

Darlene Cemohorsky — 5th 
Tony Delise — 6th 
Leslie Ward — 1st 

Beth Meny qualified in the Intermedi- 
ate Fence Division for Regionals. The 
team was overall Reserve Champion. 



Here are the results of the March 22nd 
show held at Our Farm, Norristown, Pa. 

Beginner Walk-Trot 

Rynda Ross — 1st 

Sue Ullrich - 4th 

Amy Niblock — 5th 

Lisa Brous — 5th 

Advanced Walk-Trot 

Lisa Wilkowski — 2nd 
Liza Kinney — 6th 
Ann Basrian — 5th 

Beginner Walk-Trot-Canter 

Joanna Toenniessen — 1st 

Anna Smyrycynski — 2nd 

Allison Bakos — 3rd 

Laura Harmer — 2nd 

Janice Bethman — 4th 

Open Fences 

Beth Meny — 2nd 
Leslie Ward — 3rd 

Advanced Walk-Trot-Canter 

Debbie Oesterling — 3rd 

Kris landola — 4th 
Lisa Dougherty — 3rd 

Mark Hayes — 2nd 

Nick Shvidrik — 2nd 

Julie Keane — 6th 
Brenda Werner — 3rd 

Donna Forte — 5th 

Intermediate Flat 

Melanie O'Neill - 4th 

Open Rat 

Leslie Ward — 4th 
Beth Meny — 6th 

Novice Fences 

Marybeth Polek — 4th 

After the day was over Donna Forte 
qualified in Advanced Walk-Trot-Canter 
for regionals and Leslie Ward for Open 
Flat also. The next show will be in Cham- 
bersburg, Pa., at Wilson College on 
March 29th. 



DELAWARE 

VALLEY 

COLLEGE 



DELAWARE VALLEY BASEBALL OPENS 

'87 CAMPAIGN 




86*87 Men's Basketball 
Receives Awards 

by John Litzke 

The 1986-87 Delaware Valley College 
Men's Basketball team celebrated its 
record -setting season with its annual 
awards banquet on March 22, 1987. 

Head Coach Bill Werkiser and the 
team compiled the best win /loss record 
since the 1967-68 season when the 
'67-'68 club won 14 games. This year's 
club surpassed that, mounting a 15-10 
overall record, finishing 4th behind Kings, 
Scranton, and Wilkes. 

"I'm very happy with the way our year 
went," began Werkiser. "We gained more 
than just an outstanding record in 1987; 
we gained credibility and notoriety 
throughout the league." "I'm very opti- 
mistic about the future with everybody 
returning and the excellent season our 
junior varsity had." 

"I think that we've turned the corner, 
and the players are beginning to believe 
in their ability to win. We were a very 
young team this year, and if we work just 
as hard next season as we did this season, 
we could be even more successful." 

The Aggies were led all season by the 
steady play of Dwight Weldon, who is a 
6,-1 " sophomore guard. Weldon led the 
team scoring, with a 17.1 average, field 
goal percentage (63%), free throw per- 
centage (83%), and he was second in 
rebounds with 153. 

And, according to Coach Werkiser, 
Weldon had lots of help. "Dwight had a 
very strong season, even better than last 
year, but I think that his numbers reflect 
how much of a team player he is. He 
was very patient and took only good 
shots, which is why he shot over 60%. 
and he always looked for someone else 
in a better position." 

"There are other players who played 
very well for us this year, also. Joe Butts, 
especially in the second half of the season, 
played extremely well, and Mike Sutry- 
nowicz, as a freshman, showed he has a 
very bright future. And inside, 6 '-6" 
John Boone, after missing a season, came 
back very strong." 

"Having players like this — and others 
such as Eric Ford, John Jones, and Joe 
Cherry — coming back next season makes 
us feel very optimistic about the future of 
our program." 

NOTES: Boone led the team in re- 
bounds with 195 for the season, and 
average of 7.8 per game, while Butts 
was first in assists with 95 . . . Boone was 
the second leading scorer on the team 
with 270 points, followed by Butts with 
229, Cherry with 178, and Jones with 
149. 

Following the dinner, these awards 
were presented: 

Most Valuable Player: Dwight Weldon 
Highest Scorer Award: Dwight Weldon 
NOTE: This is the second consecutive 
time that Dwight has won both awards. 
Most Improved Player Award: 

Mike Sutrynowicz 
Calvin P. Kidder III Memorial Award: 

Brian Manley 
Coaches Award: Joe Butts 
Congratulations to all who received 
awards and to both the junior varsity and 
varsity on their fine seasons. 



Humming renditions of that old 
favorite "Take Me Out to the Ballgame," 
can now be heard all over DVC for the 
1987 Aggie baseball season has truly 
begun. 

Losing his entire outfield, his entire in- 
field, and a portion of his pitching staff to 
graduation, Manager Frank Wolfgang 
traveled to sunny Florida this past spring 
break with several questions on his mind 
and lots of shoes to fill. "At this time I just 
don't have a set lineup," said Wolfgang. 
"There's a big difference between hitting 
and throwing in the gym than there is 
outside, Florida will most definitely show 
me who's ready to play." 

DVC's tenure down in Florida was a 
bit on the downside as the Aggies left 
Florida 2-5 with wins over Carson-New- 
man an Manhattan. But the main ques- 
tions on Wolfgang's mind were answered 



So, with opening day already behind 
us, here's how Delaware Valley's lineup 
stands. 

FR Dave Mraz - CF 
SO Bill Boyle - LF 
SR Scott Sucoloski - 2B 
SR Mike Heisy - C 
FR Sean Kelly - 3B 
SO Tony Sandone — RF 
SR Lome "Bubba" Bachur - DH 
SR Tom Lewandowski — SS 
SR Chris Boyle - P 
SR Mark "Cy" Rother - P 
NOTE: With the injured Dave Mraz out 
of the lineup, the likes of Paul Leinbach 
and Seamus McGlone have been platoon- 
ing in center. 

The opening day festivities were capped 
with the throwing out of the first ball by 
retiring college President Joshua Feld- 
stein and with that mighty toss, the sea- 




regarding the strength of his hitting and 
his pitching but he commented that, to 
this day, it may still be too early to tell 
and that the true potential of this young 
team has yet to be tapped. 

Outstanding contributions down in the 
grapefruit league were put in by Scott 
Sucoloski who went seven of 15 with 
two walks, two strikeouts, and two stolen 
bases, and compiled an average of .467. 
Mike Heisy and Tony Sandone went four 
of 13 apiece and each carries a .308 
average. Bill Boyle, fine young leftfield 
prospect, finished the Florida trip with a 
.273 average going three of 11 with six 
walks and five runs scored. 



son had begun. The Bears from Ursinus 
visited James Work Memorial Field open- 
ing day last Monday to engage in double- 
header action. 

The opening day pitching assignments 
would pit Chris Boyle vs. Kevin Meehan 
in game one and Joe Pietrefesa vs. Wally 
Tittlemayer in game two. . 

Fueled by third baseman Todd Blue, 
who parked two homers in his first two 
at-bats, Ursinus jumped out to a com- 
fortable 5-1 lead at the end of three inn- 
ings with all five runs being charged to 
starter Chris Boyle. 

With single runs in the third, fourth, 
and fifth innings, one coming on Cy 



Rother's first homer of the season and 
the other two coming off of triples by Bill 
Boyle and Tony Sandone, DVC closed 
the gap to 5-3 at the end of five. 

Errors plagued DVC in the top of the 
sixth as DVC committed five of them 
resulting in two Ursinus runs and without 
Chris Boyle's fine comeback pitching, it 
could have been much worse. DVC 
followed very smartly in the bottom of 
that inning as Tony Sandone hit his first 
homer of the year and Tom Lewandowski 
followed in suit with his first homer with 
Bubba Bachur scoring in front of him to 
make it a 7-6 ballgame going into the 
seventh inning. 

Ursinus scored three in the top of the 
seventh putting DVC in the hole and, un- 
able to climb out of that hole in the bot- 
tom of the seventh, Ursinus went on to 
win game one 10-6. 

Game two was all Ursinus behind their 
ace sophomore Wally Tittlemayer who 
scattered seven hits in the Bears' 9-3 win 
and sweep of the twin bill. Fine perfor- 
mances for DVC were turned in by Tony 
Sandone who went two for seven with a 
homer and a triple, Mike Heisy who 
went four of five with a double and three 
singles, and Mark Rother who went two 
for five with a homer and a single. 

"I don't know Yogi, Mr. Ranger's not 
gonna like it ." And like it they didn't as 
the Drew Rangers visited last Saturday 
and were swept by pitching aces Cy Ro- 
ther and Chris Boyle and their backups. 

In game one, DVC got three three-run 
innings and Rother pitched shutout ball 
through the first 'our giving up just three 
hits and striking out two enroute to his 
complete game victory 11-3. Stellar per- 
formances were put in by second base- 
man Scott Sucoloski who homered and 
scored twice, Mike Heisy who tripled, 
singled, and scored once, Tom Lewan- 
dowski with two singles and two runs 
scored, and Lyle Cunningham with a 
single, a double, and two runs scored. 
"Cy" Rother got his first win of the season 
with his record standing at 1-0. 

In game two, DVC received three runs 
in the first and four in the fifth to top 
Drew once again 7-2. Bill Boyle walked 
twice and scored twice and Tony San- 
done hit his second homer of the year to 
pace DVC to their second win in four 
tries. Chris Boyle picked up the win to 
set him at 1-1 and place DVC at 2-0. 
MAC and 2-2 overall. (4-7 if you count 
Florida.) 



ANSWERS TO 
CURRENT EVENTS QUIZ 

1 The father of Gary Michael Heidnik. 
In Heidnik's North Philadelphia house, 
police discovered a grisly scene of im- 
prisoned women and human body 
parts. 



2. Chrysler, who was the biggest single 
sponsor of the event. 

3. President Reagan had until then re- 
jected comparisons such as this 

4. Courts said that employers could 
legally promote women over more- 
qualified men. 

5. The rocket carrying the expensive 
satellite was launched in a rainstorm. 



6. Former Secretary of State Alexander 
M. Haig. Jr.. said he was next in 
charge after President Reagan was 
almost assassinated in April 1981 He 
is now going to run for the Republican 
nomination for president next year! 

7. Conrail. the government-owned 
freight train business. 



Library Book 
Sale Raffle 

McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia 

of Science and Technology 

1982 - 5th edition ' 

15 volumes, index. 

and yearbooks to 1986 

Excellent condition. A great gift tc 
yourself, a friend, or relative. 
Chances sold at the Library during 
regular hours starting March 30. 
1987. Winning number will be picked 
at the end of Book Sale Day — April 
9th. 

$1.00 per chance 

6 chances for $5.00 



CONTEST 

A new flower shop is offering $25 
to someone who comes up with the 
best store name — to be used by the 
owner! 

The shop is located in a small town 
in a more conservative area. 

Emphasis is on quality and service, 
(staying away from "country" idea) . 

Selling: fresh flowers — loose and 
arranged, silk and dried designs and 
material, foliage, plants, and bedding 
plants. 

Submit names to Box 405 or call 
340-1094 for more information. 




Randy Maugher performing at Caesar's Pub, 
Wednesday. March 25th Photo/ Ram Pages 






DMiRRfaifltB^MI]^ ©®fllks(g® 



Vol. XXI. No. 24 
Friday. April 10, 1987 



An Early 

Easter Present 

for your Basket! 




NOTICE; The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



Founders' Day Honors Past, Present and Future 



On Sunday. April 5, the Founders' 
Day Convocation was held in the James 
Work Gym. At this ceremony numerous 
awards for academics, athletes, faculty 
and staff are presented in recognition of 
outstanding achievements. 

The invocation was given by Rabbi 
Jeffrey K. Salkin. who introduced William 
H. Rohrer 111 as the incoming president 
of the College, was soon followed with a 
speech by Mrs. Jean Work. She spoke of 
the history of the college with emphasis 
on the presidency from Rabbi Kraus- 
kopf. to her husband James Work, to 
Dr. Feldstein. 

Dr. Mertz and Dean Tasker presented 
the awards. The more distinguished 
awards presented are as follows: 

• Founders' Day Award: Ray H. Boltz 

• Student Government Service Award: 
Dr. Craig Hill 

• Walter Riggins Memorial Award: 
Justina Drey and David Spotts 

• Distinguished Faculty Member 
Award: Dr. Julian Prundenanu 

• Staff Member of the Year Award 
(renamed John F. Herbst Staff 
Member of the Year Award) : Erma 
Martin 




Dr Joshua Feldstein. DVC president from 1974 to present, with Mr William H. Rohrer III. who will become 
the colleges next president July 1. Both men were present at Founders' Day Convocation last Sunday. 

Photo/Ram Pages 



• President's Award: '86-'87 Wrestling 
Team 

• 20- Year Distinguished Service 
Award: David Benner, Edward Gold- 
berg, Gerald Handler, Richard 
Lugar, John Mertz 

• William Owen Memorial Scholarship: 
John M. Burkhardt 

• The Class of 77 Recognition Award: 
Ann Luno 

• Student Activities Award: Theresa A. 
Sanderson 

• Publications Award: Cynthia 
Donough, John E Litzke, William H. 
Rein 

Dr. Feldstein also received a special 
award, as he will be ending his presiden- 
tial term this summer. 

We would like to recognize those stu- 
dents who received a collective number 
of awards: Judiann L. Ware, William H. 
Rein, Jim Wilson, Joan Comly and 
Gregory Mattern. Congratulations! 

The ceremony went well and the DVC 
Band and Chorale performed well. Con- 
gratulations to all award winners. 





t it? ?J*.zT 




■EL .^fl^ S&f ^^m W 








DVC Band, conducted by Mrs. Michele Metcalf. provided instrumental interludes during the Convocation 

Photo/Ram Pages 



Mrs Joann Roberts directs DVC Chorale, which sang beautifully last Sunday at Founders' Day 

Photo /Ram Pages 

GET SET FOR AD AY, APRIL 25 & 26 



* 



This Week on Campus 



HOW IT WORKS 

The biggest student-community event 
for this college is comin' 'round the cor- 
ner. We depend upon everybody to make 
A-Day the great event it can be. For 
those who are not sure of the benefits 
received for working on A-Day and its 
exhibits, here are some of the basic rules 
that apply. 

First, any DVC ICC-recognized cam- 
pus organization must send a representa- 
tive to the A-Day organizational meetings 
held regularly, since this is the best route 
to full communications between the clubs 
and the A-Day chairpersons and advisor. 
It is too late now to start this phase, so all 
exhibitors for this year have probably 
taken care of this. 

All exhibitors must work on both Fri- 
day and Monday, for set-up and take- 
down respectively; if members of your 
organization do not work on these days, 
the club is penalized. It is imperative that 
records are kept! 



Now, as for being reimbursed mone- 
tarily for work hours completed during 
the Saturday and Sunday of A-Day 
weekend: any work a person does should 
be recorded for a specific club which is 
exhibiting/ working on A-Day weekend. 
It is these hours which are collected for 
each organization and are calculated as 
to money to be given to that club. 

Money paid for work hours is based 
on a rate that is determined from total 
money left over after ALL bills for the 
A-Day weekend are paid. This means 
the wage will vary from year to year. 

Finally, ANY money made from A-Day 
sales or chance donations is required, 
from any exhibitor, to be given to the 
A-Day fund. It is from this fund that 
wages are paid, as determined by hours 
worked. 

The above information should clear 
up any questions concerning A-Day 
fundraising for DVC clubs. Any other 
questions may be directed to the A-Day 
Committee or Dr. Richard Lazarus. 





by W.L. linger 

SATURDAY, APRIL 11 

Beekeeping Short Course 

BB<A) vs. Kings, 1 p.m . 
doubleheader 

T (H) vs. Lycoming. 1 p.m 

SUNDAY, APRIL 12 

Equestrian Team at Perm State, 
8 a.m. 

LAC (H) vs Masters of Philadelphia, 
2 p.m. 

MONDAY, APRIL IS 

Housing Registration (see bulletin 
boards for details) 

TUESDAY, APRIL 14 

BloodmoWe, 12-5 p.m. m the APR 

Ray Owen at Caesar's Pub, 9-11 p.m 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15 

Student Government Elections, 
9:45 a.m., Ag. Building 

Movie: Btax$, 9 p.m. in the APR 

LAC (H) vs. Academy, 4 p.m. 

T (A) vs. Ursrnus and Haverford, 
3:30 p.m. 

BB (H) vs. Muhlenberg, 3 p.m 

SB (H) vs. Moravian, 4 p.m. 

THURSDAY, APRIL 16 

G (H) vs. Muhlenberg, 1;30 p.m 

* * * * * 



FRIDAY, APRIL 17 

Good Friday — No classes! 

SATURDAY. APRIL 18 

T (A) Rutgers Relays 

BB (A) vs UpsaJa, 1 p.m., 
doubteheader 

SUNDAY, APRIL 19 

Easter Sunday 

Equestrian Team Regionah 

MONDAY, APRIL 20 

Movie: Crocodile Dundee, 9 p.m. in 
the APR 

G (H) vs. Lebanon and Wklener. 
1 p.m. 

TUESDAY, APRIL 21 

SB (A) vs. Scranton, 2:30 p.m. 
WT(H) vs. Albright, 3:15 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22 

Class Elections, Ag. Building 

Singer John Valley, 9-11 p.m. in the 

APR 

G (A) vs. Scranton and Moravian 

LAC (H) vs Ursmus, 4 p m 

THURSDAY. APRIL 23 

BB (H) vs Washington. 1 p.m., 
doubleheader 

* * * * * 






• 






ON THE TOWN 

A GUIDE TO WHAT'S HAPPENING IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 



Phonathon '87 Calls Up Over $85,000 
From Generous Alums 



by Kevin Dickmyer 

BEAUTY PAGEANT 

Don't miss the biggest show at the 
Academy of Music, Broad & Locust 
Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. "Philadelphia's 
Prettiest," Female Beauty Pageant Semi- 
Finals and Talent Show, June 14, 3 
p.m. A donation of $10 benefits The 
Bridge, a drug and alcohol rehabilitation 
center. 

PROCLAMATION NIGHT 

Proclamation Night/Sit Down Dinner, 
July 14, 6 p.m. Advance tickets: $22, at 
the door: $25 (per person). International 
Banquet Hall, 1301 S. Delaware Ave., 
Philadelphia, Pa. For more information 
call 215/ 238-7110. 

Movies for the Week 

THE BARN -343-2088 

Platoon (R) 
7:15-9:30 

Nightmare on Elm Street 111 (R) 

7:30 - 9:30 

Lethal Weapon (R) 

7:15-9:30 

Some Kind of Wonderful (PG-13) 
7:00 - 9:00 

Police Academy 4 (PG) 
7:15-9:15 

ROUTE 309 CINEMA -646-4551 

Nightmare on Elm Street 111 (R) 
5:45 - 10:00 

Lethal Weapon (R) 
7:30 - 9:45 

Mannequin (PG) 
7:15-9:30 

Witch Board (R) 

3:30 - 7:45 

Some Kind of Wonderful (PG-13) 

7:45 - 10.00 

Crocodile Dundee (PG-13) 
8:00- 10:15 

Burglar (R) 
7:45 - 10:00 

Tin Men (R) 
7:45-10:15 

Police Academy 4 (PG) 
7:00-9:15 

Children of a Lesser God (R) 
7:30 - 10:00 



VILLANOVA SUMMER 
THEATRE AUDITIONS 

Villanova Summer Theatre will hold 
auditions for its 1987 season on April 26 
from 11 a.m. -5 p.m. at Villanova. The 
following shows are being cast: Shakes- 
peare's Julius Caesar which runs June 7 
to July 23 and the comedy Lysistrata by 
Aristophanes which runs July 8 to 25. 
All roles are paid, with both Equity and 
non-Equity positions available. Audition- 
ers are asked to prepare two contrasting 
classical pieces of about two minutes 
each. Call 215/ 645-4760 for appoint- 
ments and information. 

Resumes are also being accepted for 
those interested in working this summer 
in Costumes and Scene Construction. 
Experienced carpenters and stitchers 
may address resumes and letters of ap- 
plication to Fr. Peter Donohue, Villa- 
nova Theatre, Villanova, PA 19085. 



Billboard's 
Top 10 

TOP ALBUMS 

1. Licensed To 111, Beastie Boys 

2. Slippery When Wet, Bon Jovi 

3. The Joshua Tree, U2 

4. Graceland, Paul Simon 

5. The Way It Is, Bruce Hornsby and 
The Range 

6. Invisible Touch, Genesis 

7. Look What The Cat Dragged In, 
Poison 

8. Control, Janet Jackson 

9. The Final Countdown, Europe 
10. Life, Love and Pain, Club 

Nouveau 

TOP SINGLES 

1. "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now," 
Starship 

2. "Lean On Me," Club Nouveau 

3. "1 Knew You Were Waiting," 
Aretha Franklin & George Michael 

4. "Tonight, Tonight, Tonight," 
Genesis 

5. "Don't Dream It's Over," Crowded 
House 

6. "Come Go With Me," Expose 

7. "Sign O' The Times," Prince 

8. "Midnight Blue," Lou Gramm 

9. "Let's Go," Wang Chung 

10. "The Finer Thing," Steve Winwood 



BIKE-AID '87 CHARTS COURSE FOR TREK ACROSS AMERICA 
Student "Pedal for Progress" To Combat World Hunger 



The battle against hunger is once again 
stretching across America, as plans for 
the second annual student "Bike-Aid" 
get underway. Bike-Aid is a 3,000-mile 
summer venture from California to New 
York City designed to raise funds and 
awareness to help rid the world of un- 
necessary hunger. 

Bike-Aid, which kicks off June 17, is a 
project of the Overseas Development 
Network, a nationwide coalition of cam- 
pus anti-hunger groups. Along with such 
other social service groups as the Cam- 
pus Outreach Opportunity League and 
the National Student Campaign Against 
Hunger, ODN fosters awareness and 
understanding among college students 
about worldwide hunger and poverty. 

Helping to organize Bike-Aid '87 are 
ODN students such as Shaun Skelton, a 
doctorial candidate at George Washing- 
ton University who co-founded Bike-Aid 
last year. Skelton became involved with 
ODN two years ago, and spent most of 
last year turning the idea of Bike-Aid '86 
into reality. This year he is working as the 
project's regional coordinator for the 
Washington, D.C. area. 

"There's no better way to really learn 
about our country," reflects Skelton. "In 
one summer, we witnessed the diversity 
in the U.S. and made a direct difference 
on the problem and the lives of many 



people with whom we came in contact." 

Students traversing the country with 
Bike-Aid will not only develop iron legs, 
but will "touch the consciences of many 
Americans in communities throughout 
the country," according to Skelton. 
Riders will participate in community ser- 
vice projects at each stop to raise aware- 
ness of the need for action against 
hunger and gather financial and moral 
support for self-help development proj- 
ects around the world. 

During last summer's Bike- Aid '86, 80 
bicyclists traversed the country in two 
months, stopping in 225 towns and cities 
and raising a total of $10,000. 

"Bike-Aid is a symbol of the task our 
generation faces in the fight against 
hunger," adds Skelton. "By starting from 
different cities and converging at the 
end, we emphasize that there are many 
paths to progress. By encouraging not 
only coast-to-coast, but also short-term 
riders, we underscore the need for every- 
one to be involved." 

Bike-Aid is open to anyone who likes 
biking and is interested in joining this 
unique fundraising and educational ven- 
ture to support development efforts 
worldwide. 

For more information, contact Bike- 
Aid '87, P.O. Box 2306, Stanford, CA 
94305 or call 415/ 725-2869. 



by Bill Rein 

With seven phoning sessions spanning 
two weeks, students, alumni, administra- 
tors and staff members of DVC efforts 
paid off with the just-completed 1987 
Annual Giving Campaign Phonathon 
winning over one thousand "Yes!" res- 
ponses totaling pledges worth about 
$85,200., Mrs. Linda Dolby, DVC Di- 
rector of Alumni Affairs, reported Mon- 
day. Mrs. Dolby would like to thank the 
many, many students who volunteered 
to spend their time calling alumni across 
the country (and beyond) for the col- 
lege's unrestricted funds. 

This Phonathon was indeed a success. 
Last year, about $55,000. was raised 
during a Phonathon which was held for 
only one week. This year, three nights 
per week, plus one Sunday of alumni 
callers, increased the pledges, which, 
when received in the college mail, will go 
to the area of greatest need at that time. 
This is why it is called the unrestricted 
fund; these donations are not earmarked 
and therefore are separate from any 
specific, named fund campaigns the col- 
lege may hold. 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 

INTERVIEWS FOR THE 

WEEK OF APRIL 13 

Monday, April 13 

PREMIER INDUSTRIAL 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

L.J. MAKRANCY LANDSCAPING 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Tuesday, April 14 

PRUDENTIAL 

Dining Hall 10:45 a.m. -12:45 p.m. 

UPJOHN INTERNATIONAL INC. 
Individual interviews 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

YOUNG AMERICANS 

VOLUNTEER FOR WORK 

IN EUROPE 

More than 200 young Americans are 
expected to volunteer for international 
work camps in Eastern and Western 
Europe this summer. Though little known 
in the U.S., international work camps 
have been operating for more than 30 
years and bring together thousands of 
young people from around the world 
each year to work on projects that benefit 
the local community. 

The Council on International Educa- 
tional Exchange (CIEE) , the largest stu- 
dent travel organization in the U.S., has 
been a sponsor of the work camps since 
1982. Usually two-four weeks in dura- 
tion, the camps provide free room and 
board to volunteers. 

Projects for this summer include: res- 
toring castles and forts and excavating 
ancient sites in Portugal, Czechoslovakia, 
France and Spain; community work in 
Denmark, Turkey, Wales, Germany and 
Holland; and agricultural and ecologi- 
cal programs in Poland, Hungary and 
Ireland. 

There are no special skills required of 
volunteers simply a willingness to get in- 
volved and an open-minded approach. 
English is spoken at most camps except 
in France and Spain where the native 
language is used. Many participants use 
this opportunity to improve their lan- 
guage skills. 

Volunteers must be at least 18 years 
old, except in Germany where 16-year- 
olds are accepted. Beyond a modest 
program fee of $100, there is no cost 
other than airfare. 

For more information and an applica- 
tion, contact CIEE, International Work 
Camps, 205 East 42nd St., New York, 
NY 10017 or call 212/ 695-0293. 



Phonathon participants are volunteers, 
yes, but are usually not there just for the 
sore ears! Many are attracted to the fine 
food, drink and friends made in only one 
night; and it sure is intriguing to call 
Florida, California and Canada to talk to 
the old college alumni — Including Na- 
tional Farm School, National Agriculture 
College graduates who have made it and 
who have earned a load of history first 
hand. Often simple conversations can 
turn a "maybe" response to a "yes" 
pledge. You have fun, and the college 
benefits too. 

Here's more: Callers have won free 
pizzas for getting the most pledges in one 
night; winners in this category this year 
include Jerry Fritz, Brenda Werner, 
Michele Dobbs, John Stierly, Ray Boltz, 
Charles Morgan, Jim Yeager and Donna 
Hayek. Overall, Jerry Fritz received the 
most pledges, and Charles Morgan re- 
ceived the most donors (those who have 
not given to this campaign in several 
years). 

Special acknowledgement should go 
to DVC president Dr. Joshua Feldstein, 
whose calls helped raise approximately 
half this year's Phonathon total! 

Rumor Has It . . . 

Who says DVC life is boring? You can 
always find "the ultimate" party scene at 
Goldman 2nd (Wolf Pak) hasn't missed 
a night yet with those teeny boppers right 
by their side. 

Have any of you seen an orange cone 
on dorm roofs (Wolfson) lately? The 
guys from "the room" rescued it but 
aren't keeping it since they managed to 
do damage using it as a javelin. 

Congratulations to J. Michael B. on 
his latest accomplishment: College Re- 
publican's New State Treasurer! 

Up in Cooke Hall, the "most excite- 
ment we've had in awhile" (claims one 
witness) was the moving out of a room- 
mate whose sister claims property was 
stolen by the former roommate. She 
"must" have dropped all those clothes 
somewhere between Cooke and Berk. 
Did you women find that TV yet? 

MONEY-FOR-COLLEGE 

by Irving Bender 

College, the great American dream, 
becomes a nightmare when the bills start 
coming in. What to do? The good news 
is: PRIVATE SOURCE scholarships, 
grants and loans. 

Your eligibility for private source 
awards has nothing to do with govern- 
ment financial aid. 

You are eligible for awards based on 
factors in your background, including 
HELD OF STUDY. 

For example, if your field is TURF- 
GRASS MANAGEMENT, you are eligi- 
ble for a scholarship of varying amount, 
renewable for two to four years, from the 
Golf Course Superintendents Associa- 
tion of America. Deadline is June 15. 

Every student is eligible for many 
awards from the many private sources. 
The problem is not, "Is there college 
money for me?" (There is literally BIL- 
LIONS available.) 

The problem is, "How can I know all 1 
am eligible for?" This is an enormous 
chore because there are so many inde- 
pendent sources. 

You can tap the world's largest com- 
puterized database of private award 
sources: over 200,000 listings covering 
UNDERGRADUATE, GRADUATE and 
OVERSEAS study. For free details, 
write: Financial Aid Finders, 77 Gristmill 
Road, Randolph, NJ 07869. Or call 
TOLL-FREE 800-992-0424 (from NJ: 
201-361-2567). 




p*Ri 




%/«a^-Up 



THE SMOKE CLEARED . . . THE TAPE WAS BROKEN . . . 
THE TAPE COLORED GREEN & GOLD: TRACK '87 TAKES OFF! 



The 1987 women's track team will 
miss the talented captain of last year's 
team in Chris Frazier. Leadership will 
come from Tina Drey (shot, discus, jave- 
lin) with three years experience and 
scores in the MAC. Joining Tina will be 
junior Connie Hajioannou who will be 
top performer in the 400 meters and 400 
hurdles. 

Randi Kunkel could provide the talent 
and versatility to compete in the heptha- 
lon. Randi will compete in the hurdles, 
relays, jumps, shot, discus and javelin. 

Returning veterans Sharon Chapman, 
sprints and jumps, along with Tracy Mar- 
shall provide solid performances for the 
team. Discus thrower Tracy Murray will 
return. 



RESULTS OF SUSQUEHANNA 
INTIVATIONAL HELD MARCH 28 

Track 

400 Relay: Chapman, Marshall, 
Hajioannou, Stackhouse (55:61) 

100: Chapman (14:30), Marshall 
(14:25), Albert (14.2) 

1500: Stackhouse (5:06) 

400: Hajioannou (65:44), Smith (69) 

800: Stackhouse (2.30:25) 

200: Marshall (30:05), Ireland (31) 

400 IH: Hajioannou (73:28) 

3,000 M: Decker (13:46) 

1,600 Relay: Kunkel, Hajioannou, 
Drey, Stackhouse (4:26) 

Field 

Long Jump: Kunkel (15 '-9"), 
Chapman (13 '-5"), Ireland 
(12 '-5") 




Newcomers: Donna Albert (sprints); 
Laura Chudhowski (sprints), Denna 
Smith (200-400), Kia Ireland (sprints 
and jumps), Liz Decker (distance) will 
provide needed back-up. 

Middle distance ace Debbie Stack- 
house, a junior has unlimited potential 
to score in several events in the MAC 
Conference. 

Richard Acker, as second year coach 
is optimistic about duplicating the 
women's five win and zero loses in dual 
meets and its eighth place finish in the 
MAC Conference. 



Triple Jump: Kunkel (31 '-9"), 
Marshall (27' -7"), Chapman 
(28 '-6") 

Shotput: Kunkel (33'), Drey (31 '-9") 

Discus: Drey (88') 

Javelin: Kunkel (125'), Drey (96 '-8") 

High Jump: Kunkel (5') 

An excellent turnout of 50 candidates 
for the 1987 men's track team provides 
spirited competition for the 14 events to 
be covered in college track and field. A 
number of football and basketball athletes 
have joined the returning track veterans 



to provide needed depth for a strong 
track and field squad. 

Leading a talented contingent of sprint- 
ers under the leadership of co-captains 
senior Steve Caffey (100-200) and David 
Keich (100-200). Returning veterans 
Mike Williams, senior, (200-400) medal- 
ist in the MAC's and sophomores Jim 
'Enoch, Kevin Dickmyer will form the 
nucleus for the sprint group. Jim Wilson, 
leading football running back, is rapidly 
proving to be a top sprinter along with 
newcomers Marc Reason,. Lamont Roth- 
maller and Tom Allen give added strength 
in the short distances. Others competing 
in the sprints include: Joe Brown, Bill 
Howard, Bill Green, Mike Whigham, 
Steve Owens, Leo Reaver and Ed 
Widemer. 

Hurdling duties will be handled by a 
promising group of freshmen including 
Phil Sperry, Mark Brinsky and Charles 
Delaney. Tom Makowski, returning in 
the intermediate hurdles, will be joined 
by freshmen Mark Vogeler and Keith 
Alderfer. 

Middle distance aces Rob Benner 
(800-1,500) and Hardy Rueb (400-800) 
have all the credentials to be tops in the 
MAC's. The long distances will be led by 
David Spotts (co-captain) who was a 
bronze medalist in the MAC 10,000, 
who will also run the 5,000 meters. 
Other long distance dependables include 
Jon Thomson (senior) and sophomores 
Tony Donofrio and Sean Miller. 

Jumping events have veteran entries 
in Steve Caffey, long and triple jump, 
and David Keich, high jump and long 
jump, both capable of placing high in the 
MAC's. Additional strength in the jumps 
will come from Frank Gilbert, Mike 
Mazur, Leo Reaver, Phil Sperry, John 
Wiorek, Paul Sterling and Charles De- 
laney. Pole vaulters include Jeff Ader- 
holt, Keith Alderfer and Mark Vogeler. 

Weight events are led by co-captain 
and MAC medalist Jim Flukey in the 
javelin. Returning after a year of absence 
and giving a great boost to the throwing 
events is Jim Bauzon (shot, discus, jave- 
lin), Steve Liller, veteran shotputter, 
John Wiorek (discus), Bill Brosky (jave- 
lin), Andy Ernst (shot) and Jim Dudley 
(javelin) bring experience to the weight 
events. Newcomers to these events in- 
clude Mike Malec, Gino Reilly, Ted Mc- 
Elwee and David Miller. 



LACROSSE OPENS WITH BIG WIN OVER TSU; 
LESS THAN PERFECT AGAINST ANC 



The fast acting goalie Hank Kasprzak 
saved 28 out of 28 Trenton State shots 
taken on goal. Without the help of the 
hard-hitting defense led by Dan Rothen- 
heber, Vince Coviello and Sean Sanster, 
the game could have taken another 
direction. 

On the other hand, without the sharp 
shooting offense the score would have 
never been 10-0. Leading the scoring 
streak were attackmen Jay Wood and 
Gary Orietizi with three goals each. Next 
in the scoring limelight was midfielder 
Bob Sauer with two goals. Midfielders 
Juan DeSouza and Chris Falkner had 
one goal each. Aiding the lead scorers 



were attackmen Dave Rodgers and Jim 
DeCourcey with three assists each. Mid- 
fielder Tom Await and attackman Ray 
Woytas also aided in the scoring with two 
assists each. 

The DVC lacrosse team had a very 
good season home opener and will 
hopefully continue this winning capability 
throughout the season. Come out and 
cheer them on. 

The lacrosse team's first away game 
was at the Academy of the New Church 
and was far from a cataclysm, even 
though they did not come home with a 
win. 



With a score of 10-4, Hank Kasprzak 
saved 36 shots on goal out of 46 taken . 
Tough defensemen Dan Rothenheber 
and Vince Coviello helped to keep the 
opponent's offense from dominating the 
field. 

DVC's offense was led by attackman 
Ray Woytas who netted two goals. Mid- 
fielders Juan DeSouza and Tom Await 
scored one goal each. 

The next home game will be April 12 
against Masters Lacrosse Club. Thank 
you for your support. 



The coaching staff includes Dick Acker 
in his second year as head coach and as- 
sistants Jim Garvin and Jeff Acker. Ken 
McDaid (1986 DVC captain) is a volun- 
teer assistant. The team expects to im- 
prove on its 1986 three wins and two 
losses dual meet record and fifth place 
finish in the MAC with the depth in all 
events. 




RESULTS OF SUSQUEHANNA 
INTIVATIONAL HELD MARCH 28 

Track 

10,000 M: Spotts (34:17), Thomson 

(36:52) 
400 Relay: Caffey, Williams, Reason, 

Wilson (43:99) 
110 HH: Brinsky (15:91), Sperry 

(16:02), Delaney (16:43) 
100: Wilson (11:23), Dickmyer 

(11:34), Rothmaller (11.91) 
400: Reason (51:28), Enoch (52:16), 

Allen (52:99) 
800: Benner* (1:58), Rueb (2:00) 
200: Dickmyer (23:04), Wilson (23:8) 
400 IH: Makowski* (59:06), Sperry 

(60:02), Brinsky (61:09) 
5,000: Donofrio (17:26) 
1,600 Relay: 3:24.8 [Reason (50:06), 

Enoch (51:02), Rueb (50:09), 

Benner (51:06)] 

Field 

Long Jump: Caffey (19 '-7"), Gilbert 

(F), Reaver* (19'-4V4") 
Triple Jump: Sperry (41 '-5"), Caffey 

(41 '-3"), Gilbert (F) 
Shotput: Bauzon (43 '-7"), Liller 

(39'10"), Ernst (37') 
Discus: McElwee (119'), Bauzon 

(117'), Wiorek (109') 
Javelin: Flukey* (190 '-8"), Bauzon 

(179'), Brosky (127') 
High Jump: Keich (5 '-4"), Reaver 

(5 '-10"), Wiorek (NH) 

Personal Best 



SPORTS' BRIEFS '87 

by John Litzke 

THEY'RE SO BRIEF, 

YOU WONT SEE THEM 

FOR TWO WEEKS. 



CLUB NEWS 

Scuba Club 

Mandatory reorganization^ meeting, 
April 15 in Freshman Biology Laboratory 
(Mandell211)at4:10p.m. 





ATTENTION ALL 

INTRAMURAL SOFTBALL 

TEAMS, PLAYERS 

& CAPTAINS 

Have your game in Ram Pages. All 
you need to do is put the teams that 
clashed, the final score, the team records 
and any highlights, homers, sparkling 
defensive plays, no-hitters, four for four's, 
stolen bases and anything worth noting 
on a piece of paper and place it in Box 
951. Have a MVP season 



FUTURE TEACHERS: 
Read This 

The Foreign and Domestic Teachers 
Organization needs teacher applicants in 
all fields from kindergarten through col- 
lege to fill over 600 teaching vacancies 
both at home and abroad. 

Since 1968, this organization has been 
filling vacancies and locating teachers 
both in foreign countries and in all fifty 
states. They possess hundreds of current 
openings, and they have information 
concerning scholarships, grants and fel- 
lowships for those pursuing a teaching 
career. 

Right now, there is still a need for 
about 200+ teachers to fill positions in 
the Midwest, West and overseas. 

FTDO information is FREE. It comes 
at an opportune time when there are 
more teachers than teaching positions. 

For more information, write The Na- 
tional Teacher's Placement Agency, Uni- 
versal Teachers, Box 5231, Portland, 
OR 97208. 

The Agency does not promise every 
graduate in education a definite position, 
but they do promise to provide a range 
of hundreds of current vacancy notices. 



DVC BASEBALL UPDATE 

RAINOUTS!! SEE YOU 
IN TWO WEEKS. 



VORDS UNUNITED 

Typing/Word Processing Services 

Resumes (professionally written) 

Cover Letters • Mailings 

Term Papers • Theses 

Dissertations 

PICK UP AND DELIVERY 

Need something typed? 
CALLW*-9776 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: 12 Horse Ale 
Night 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

WED. NIGHT: $1 Cheesesteak 
Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

Areo's Best Lunches 1 1 AM ■ 3 PM 

Hoppy Hour 4 - 6:30 PM 

Rt 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



Sales Consultants 



Open for 
opportunity 



Macy ' fc Kins of Prussia— 
it's not just another desk job. 



You ve worked hard the last two years to take 
full charge of your career You ve learned to 
take decisive action— to trunk fast on your feet 

And now you want to put all that to work in a 
job that rewards your dedication, hard work 
and ambition 

Look no further At Macy s King of Prussia 
we're open for opportunity As a Sales Consul 
tant, you II advise and direct customers 
develop a personal clientele and maintain— 
and surpass— the superior standard of Macy s 
customer service that has made us famous 
nationwide 

You II earn a guaranteed draw against com- 
mission— to $25,000 even more 1 And excel- 
lent company paid benefits like medical and 
dental With unmatched retail experience 

Apply in person to the Personnel Office, 



Mscy's King of Prussia, or call Kathy 
Novak at (21 5) 337-9350, ext. 248 We are 

an equal opportunity employer m/f 



macys 

DQmDCR)ttr 



to*es tt^e f af™*v na*^© 




IDEA: 

A DVC DUNK 
CALENDAR 

To sell at basketball 

games and to students . 

who enjoy high 

altitude basketball! 



STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Bill Rein 

Sports Editor . John E. Litzke 

Advertising Editor . . . Wendy L. Unger 

Entertainment Editor . Kevin Dickmyer 

Reporters Jerry L. Fritz, 

Connie Hajioannou. 
Annmarie Whitesell 

Advisors Anne Shobert. 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 

See news in the making? 
Write P.O. Box 988. 



ALLTIMES EASTERN TIME. PM 

mmm home games 



1987 PHILLIES SCHEDULE 



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HOMCQAUES G— GROUP NIGHT— A Jl 00 reduction on boa *nd reserved seals lor groups ol 25 or more on April 14, stay I, stay 20. June 5, June 29 July 23 August 10. August2b, September 12 September 29 

DISCOUNT DATES FOP, SENIOR CITIZENS — Anyone Si or over will receive I SI 00 discount on the price ol a bo* or reserved seel on any group discount dele isee tbove) 

Ticket Requests lor Individual Games: Mail orders accompanied by a check or money order are now being accepted These requests lor individual games will be lilted and mailed prior to the opening ol public sale 

THE MAJOR LEAGUES MOST VALUABLE PROMOTION LINKUP 

(9) Schmidt Bat Day a (13) Rosenbluth's instant Vacation Night 

(10) Watch Day a (14) Jackal Day a 

Ol) Fireworks Night (15) Tha Equitable OWttme* a Gama 

(12) Ball Day a (16) Fraa Lunch Day a 



(1) Opening Night 

<3| Tastykake Pnotocatds Day a 

(4) Phanatic Birthday. M A B T Shirt Day a 

(5) Corduroy Cap Day— Men 15 and Over 



16) Mellon Baseball Glove a 
|7) Taslykake Travel Bag Day 

Women 15 and Over 
(8) Fu|i Camera Day 



(17) First Penna Bank 
Business Person's Special 

(18) Back to School Day a 

(19) JBF Gama 



(20) Halloween al the Vat a 

(21) First Penna Bank Constitution Day 

(22) Fan Appreciation Day 



PLEASE NOTE C h a n ge s or additions may be made to this promotion schedule 



■ CHILD GIFT DAYS: For eMtdren 14 years or younger ChJW must be accompanied by a paying aduM la receive the Hem 
For official Phillies clothing, souvenirs equipment and Phanatic items visit GoW Medal Sporting goods located in Northeast Phila , Roiborough. PA. Cmujmlnaon. NJ. Cherry Mill, NJ , Willow Grove, PA Warrington PA 
Maylair, Pa Springfield Pa King of Prussia Pa or call Toll Free (Penna ) 800-562-5361 Outside Penna 80O 523-0212 



• Vote • 

Student 

Government 

Elections 

April 15 



Class Officer 
Elections 
April 22 

CONNIE! for 

Class of '88 

President 






DMbwsmrb Wllkssf ©©flOcsg® 



Vol. XXI, No. 25 
Friday, April 24. 1987 




NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



Highlights 

Fubar the Robot 2 

Year In Pictures 4 

Sports Wrap-Up 6 

May Calendar 10 

Senior Spotlights Coming May II 



WELCOME TO A-DAY '87 

Dr. Feldstein Reflects on His Presidency 
Remembers His Life as Student, Teacher and Leader 



by Ann Whitcsell 

A writers paints a mental image of a 
place, a time, or a person. It is with deep 
respect that I paint the final picture of Dr. 
Joshua Feldstein as President of Delaware 
Valley College. 

When 1 looked to this man, I thought, 
why so deep a devotion to an institution 
— what is the connection between Dr. 
Feldstein and Delaware Valley College? 
In his talk with me. his love for the Col- 
lege was shown by the expression on his 
face as he recalled the memories. 

Dr. Feldstein arrived in the United 
States from Lithuania in the spring of 
1939. His journey was an amazing one. 
He left his family behind at the coaxing of 
family friends here in America. The 
friends told him that the National Farm 
School could help him become acclimated 
to the U.S. Joshua Feldstein did not know 
much English when he arrived here; he 
knew short phrases like "hello," "good- 
bye." "My name is Joshua." His parents 
believed that if he stayed in a big town 
such as Chicago. Boston, or New York, 
he would only remain with his ethnic 
group, and therefore would have a hard 
time succeeding in this new country. 
One of the president's personal memories 
is that he started school on April 1, 1939, 
and that he was placed on the payroll of 
the NFS on April 1. 1942. The college, 
from the day he placed his feet on its soil, 
became his life. 

Leaving behindin tension-filled Europe 
the family that he would lose in the Holo- 
caust a few months later. Dr. Feldstein 
traveled alone across the world to this 
rural setting. His sense of being was in a 
state of shock. Dr. Feldstein recalled how 
he walked up a dirt path from the train 
station. It was an isolated setting. The 
only buildings around were Allman, 
Lasker, Segal, Penn (now Miller) Halls, 
the Chapel, the Horticulture Building, 
and only the main part of the Krauskopf 
Library. The only other structures were 
some barns. The entire population of the 
school was 180 students, plus faculty 
and staff. 

Joshua Feldstein and his classmates 
became as family — working together, 
eating together, and studying together. 
The future president said he excelled at 
his classes because he was interested in 
what he was taught, and he well-prepared 
for class by reading and studying ahead 
of time. Along with his studies, as a stu- 
dent Dr. Feldstein was expected to work. 
Every student, no matter what major, 
did chores — whether it be milking, tend- 
ing animals, or preparing the land. Dr. 
Feldstein majored in general Horticulture, 
so his task was tending the orchard; yet 
he had hands-on-experience in every field 
of agriculture. In addition to all his work, 
Dr. Feldstein played soccer at the college; 
of his graduating year soccer team, five 
of his teammates now hold Ph.D.'s and 
eight have their Master's degrees. 



Coming through many trying periods 
such as losing his family, making a new 
life for himself, and working toward a 
degree, gave Dr. Feldstein the strength 
to climb even further to success. He went 
through many steps on his way to becom- 
ing the president of Del Val: first graduate 
studies, then undergraduate teaching, 
Assistant to the Dean, then Dean, and 
finally the President of DVC. These ex- 
periences made him ready for the long 
road ahead of him. 

I was amazed at all the humorous sto- 
ries Dr. Feldstein told me. His face was 
creased with laugh lines and his eyes 
gleamed. It seemed the more he recalled 
his days as a student and young profes- 
sor, the happier he became. Then we 
discussed what he believed in has made 
the College what it is today. 




Photo /Ram Pages files 

The students of the past were totally 
devoted to their school. Everything was 
done to improve the school. Participation 
in extracurricular activities was the major 
part of living on campus. With such a 
small population it was important to pull 
together. To continue the success of the 
school, Dr. Feldstein believes students, 
teachers, and administrators must work 
toward a common goal. The saying, we 
are told, is "The students are our life's 
blood, and our alumni are our claim to 
fame!" 

The improvements seen in Dr. Feld- 
stein's time as president include the addi- 
tion of buildings for students' use (the 
Student Center is the biggest example,) a 
better-trained faculty, and the addition of 
several new majors programs. The Library 
was expanded. The James Work Mem- 
orial Stadium became a reality, replacing 
what was basically a playing field. 

The faculty is still as caring as ever, but 
most professors today have gone on to 
obtain advanced degrees or specializa- 
tion. Assistance programs have come a 
long way with the Placement Office, 
counseling, and tutoring programs. 

continued on page 3 




1941 National Farm School Soccer team included the future College president (center) 

. . . and Sends Students a Letter 

Dear Students: 



As all of you know, I shall retire from 
the Presidency of the College on June 
30th, 1987. 

I take this opportunity to wish you good 
health and a long rewarding, successful, 
and productive life in a world of peace, 
compassion, and understanding. 

As I reflect on my continuous associa- 
tion with our College over a period of 48 
years, I am happy to have had the op- 
portunity to work with thousands of stu- 
dents and hundreds of faculty and staff 
members. The vast majority of these 
people were highly motivated, dedicated, 
and always doing what was right and 
proper in the best interests of all con- 
cerned. I have always judged the Col- 
lege's and my personal successes by the 
successes of our students and graduates. 
I believe that a professor's most impor- 
tant income is the "psychic income" 
which is derived from the satisfaction of 
having contributed to the intellectual 
growth and development, maturity, 
knowledge, and experiences of students 
and graduates. 1 count my blessings and 
am thankful for the various opportunities 
I have had to help students throughout 
the past four decades. I am also grateful 
for the privilege I have had to contribute 
to the progress of our College which is 
your present home and future alma 
mater. 

I will continue to live on campus and 
to be active on the College's Board of 
Trustees and in the Alumni Association. I 
also intend to write a book on the history 
of our College and hope to teach from 
time to time. I certainly will continue to 
help the College in every way I can and I 
will support wholeheartedly our incoming 
President, W.H. Rorer, III. 



I urge each and everyone of you to 
strive to reach your highest potential. 
Our College has much to offer and I hope 
that you will take advantage of the many 
opportunities which are available here at 
Delaware Valley. 

May God bless you now and always. 

f ) Joshua Feldstein 

^'ftSiflii fifflfciii iii ' "fiiHT^^ 
This Week on Campus 

* by W.L. Unger 

FRIDAY, APRIL 24 

* NO CLASSES! 
A- Day set-up 

T (A) Perm Relays 

ATURDAY, APRIL 25 * 

A Day! 

BB (A) vs. Scranton, 1 p.m., 
doubieheader + 

SB (H) vs. Philadelphia Textile. 1 p.m 

T (A) Penn Relays 

T (A) Millersville Invitational * 

SUNDAY, APRIL 26 

A-Day! 

LAC (H) vs. Trenton. 2 p.m. * 

MONDAY, APRIL 27 

NO CLASSES! 

A-Day clean-up T* 

TUESDAY, APRIL 28 

Follow a Friday schedule 

Movie. The Rrver" 9 p.m. In the APR 

THURSDAY, APRIL 30 

ft 
FRIDAY, MAY 1 

DVC Drama Club presents "Afice in 

the weekend, in Mandefl 114. 
* * * * 






ON THE TOWN 

A GUIDE TO WHAT'S HAPPENING IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 



by Kevin Dickmyer 

Legendary Supergroup Deep Pur- 
ple Returns to Spectrum in Electric 
Factory Concert 

The classic sounds and timeless lyrics 
of the celebrated rock group Deep Purple 
will be on order when the group returns 
to The Spectrum for two concerts on Fri- 
day, April 24 and Saturday, April 25, 
both at 8 p.m. Opening the concerts will 
be Bad Company. 

Presented by Electric Factory Concerts, 
tickets at $15.50 and $13.50 are on sale 
at The Spectrum box office and all Ticke- 
tron locations, including Showcase stores 
in the Delaware Valley. Tickets can also 
be charged by phone by calling Teletron 
at 1-800-233-4050. 

Since their inception in 1968, Deep 
Purple has firmly established themselves 
as an institution in the rock world. Their 
debut album "Shades of Deep Purple" 
contained the Top Five smash "Hush," 
and the group suddenly received nation- 
wide attention when the album reached 
*24 on the charts. 

After a number of other albums includ- 
ing the landmark "Deep Purple in Rock" 



Movies for the Week 

THE BARN -343-2088 

Platoon (R) 
7:30 - 9:45 

Secref of My Success (PG 13) 
7:45 - 9:55 

Lethal Weapon (R) 
7:15-9:30 

Project X (PG) 

8:00- 10:15 

Police Academy 4 (PG) 

Daily 5:00 

ROUTE 309 CINEMA-646 4551 

Three for the Road (PG)Daily 9:45 

Lethal Weapon (R) 

8:00- 10:15 

Raisin's Arizona (PG) 
8:00- 10:15 

Secret of My Success (PG 13) 
7:30 - 10:00 

Crocodile Dundee (PG 13) 
7:30 - 9:45 

Burglar (R) 

7:15-9:30 

Tin Men (R) 

7:45- 10:15 

Police Academy 4 (PG) 
7:45- 10:15 

Project X (PG) 
7:30 - 9:45 



Opera Company 

of Philadelphia 

On Monday, April 27 and Friday, May 
1 the Opera Company of Philadelphia 
will present the final production of its 
1986-87 season, Charles Gounod's 
romantic tragedy Romeo et Juliette The 
opening night performance will be exactly 
120 years since the opera premiered at 
the Theatre-Lyrique in Paris. Both per- 
formances will be at the Academy of 
Music at 8:00 p.m. 

Tickets for Romeo et Juliette may be 
purchased through the Academy of Music 
Box Office (215/893-1930) or the Great 
er Philadelphia Cultural Alliance TICKET- 
booth at 15th and Market Streets. Charge 
orders may be placed by calling PHIL-A- 
CHARGE at (215) 735-5266. 

Student rush tickets, subject to availa- 
bility, go on sale 30 minutes before the 
performance at the Academy of Music 
Box Office. Rush tickets can be purchased 
for $3.00 with valid student identification. 



which introduced a new genre called 
"heavy rock," Deep Purple created "Ma- 
chine Head" in 1972. The album gained 
worldwide acclaim, reaching the Top Ten 
on the U.S. charts and producing the 
popular hit single "Smoke on the Water." 
Finally in 1973 the group garnered the 
coveted "Billboard" Sales Award for top- 
selling group with the release of "Made in 
Japan." The album, which hit # 6 on the 
charts and was considered "the classic 
hard rock album of all times" made Deep 
Purple an international success story. 

The group, consisting of guitarist Ritchie 
Blackmore, lead vocalist Ian Gillan, key- 
boardist Jon Lord, bassist Roger Glover, 
and drummer Ian Piace, will bring their 
most recent collaboration "The House of 
the Blue Light" to The Spectrum stage. 

Bad Company made their debut in 
1974 with their chart-topping album of 
the same name. The rock trio includes 
guitarist Nick Ralphs, drummer Simon 
Kirke, and new lead vocalist Brian Howe. 
Their current album includes the hit 
singles "This Love" and "That Girl." 



Billboard's 
Top 10 

TOP ALBUMS 

1. The Joshua Tree, U2 

2. Licensed To III, Beastie Boys 

3. Slippery When Wet, Bon Jovi 

4. Look What The Cat Dragged In, 
Poison 

'5. Graceland, Paul Simon 

6. Life, Love and Pain, Club 
Nouveau 

7. The Way It Is, Bruce Hornsby & 
The Range 

8. Trio, Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt, 
Emmylou Harris 

9. The Final Countdown, Europe 
10. Control, Janet Jackson 



TOP SINGLES 

1. "I Knew You Were Waiting," 
Aretha Franklin & George Micheal 

2. "Don't Dream It's Over," 
Crowded House 

3. "Sign O' The Times," Prince 

4. "Looking For A New Love," 
Jody Watley 

5. "Died In Your Arms," 
Cutting Crew 

6. "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now." 
Starship 

7. "La Isla Bonita," Madonna 

8. "The Finer Things," 
Steve Winwood 

9. "Midnight Blue," Lou Gramm 
10. "With Or Without You." U2 



Billboard's 
Top Pop Hits 

SINGLES 

Week Ending 4/16/77 

1. "Don't Give Up On Us," 
David Soul 

2. "Don't Leave Me This Way," 
Thelma Houston 

3. "Southern Nights," Glenn 
Campbell 

4. "Hotel California," Eagles 

5. "The Things We Do For Love," 
lOcc 

Week Ending 4/15/67 

1. "Somethin' Stupid," Nancy and 
Frank Sinatra 

2. "Happy Together." Turtles 

3. "This Is My Song," Petula Clarke 

4. "Bernadette," Four Tops 

5. "A Little Bit You, A Little Bit Me," 
Monkees 




FUBAR D. ROBOT 



Clear out the campus patrol! Call in 
the Co-eds! And batten down your room- 
mate! Delaware Valley College may never 
be the same. 

FUBAR is coming! 

FUBAR??? A new frat house? The 
dean of discipline? A test tube freshman? 

"Nix all of the above," intones FUBAR 
D. ROBOT. "I'm here to be B.M.O.C." 
In his case, that's big MACHINE on cam- 
pus. "Eat your heart out R2D2." 

Not since "Bonzo" went to college (a 
couple of decades before Bonzo went to 
the white house) has such commotion 
come to campus. Is it FUBAR's alien 
mystique? His athletic frame (he easily 
converts to a nautilus unit)? Or his Robot 
Redford good looks? "Nah," confesses 
FOOBIE congenially, "I'm just filthy rich." 

You need more than money to be 
B.M.O.C. on this campus. 



"O.K., O.K.," computes the red-eyed, 
six-fingered, roving rogue. "Throw in that 
I'm campaigning for president . . . on the 
T.G.I.F. — Thank Goodness It's Fubar 
- ticket!" 

If you want more credentials than that. 
FUBAR says he's also an author with 
two manuscripts in progress: REAL 
ROBOTS DONT SPEAK JAPANESE 
and ROBOTS DO IT AUTOMATICAL- 
LY. Add his appearances on Good Morn 
ing America, The Merv Griffin Show, 
and the 1983 US Magazine Awards show 
and the 4- wheeled, plex-head begins to 
demonstrate some substance. 

"Besides," says FUBAR, "I can do 
your next four semesters of homework in 
just three minutes." 

For those answers and more, don't 
miss FUBAR's frantic antics, mesmerizing 
music, and words of wit. Saturday. April 
25, A-Day at the .Student Center. 



IN THE GREEN 



You stand on it. You walk, run. picnic 
and play on it. The "It," in this case, is 
the soft, green grass under your feet. Turf- 
grass, as it is sometimes called, is the 
most talked about and least appreciated 
commodity we have. It may be your own 
lawn, a city park, an athletic field, or a 
golf course. For many it represents a 
comfortable environment, a place to es- 
cape the pressures of day-to-day living; a 
place to refresh the body and spirit. 

In the United States today there are an 
estimated 25 to 30 million acres of grass, 
making it the largest single crop in acreage 
grown on American soil. The turfgrass 
industry encompasses the development, 
production and management of special- 
ized grasses for utility, beautification and 
recreational facilities. It is a fast growing 
giant with the increase in population, 
new land and home developments, new 
golf courses, expansion of business and 
industrial buildings — all of which need 
turf. 

The demand for quality turf has created 
a greater need for qualified specialists to 
manage it. Through the Turfgrass Man- 
agement program here at DVC, graduates 
fill a wide range of positions throughout 
the turfgrass industry as lawn care special- 



ists, sod farm managers and commercial 
salespeople in seed, fertilizer and equip- 
ment companies. In response to the in- 
creasing number of career opportunities 
in the turfgrass field, and elective minor 
in Turf and Grounds Management 
has been introduced into the DVC cur- 
riculum in the Agronomy and the Orna- 
mental Horticulture Departments. 

To promote our turf program, a 
"Greens Committee" has been formed 
consisting of faculty members, alumni, 
and representatives of the turf industry 
under the chairmanship of Dr. Ronald 
Muse. 

The next step in the development of 
the program would be the creation of 
separate, highly maintained turf areas 
such as golf greens, tees and fairways 
which could be used for educational pur- 
poses by students. A nine-hole golf 
course would be ideal, but probably not 
feasible at this time. A more realistic goal 
might be the construction of two golf 
greens, tees, fairways and perhaps some 
demonstrational turf plots. Anyone that 
feels this type of proposal has merit, and 
is interested in supporting it, should con- 
tact the Agronomy Department, Mr. 
Don Claycomb or Dr. Ronald Muse. 







THE GREEN SCENE 
ATDVC 

by Jerry L. Fritz, Jr. 

Garden Trip to 

Winterthur Gardens 

The Landscape- Nursery Club is plan- 
ning their spring garden trip. This year 
we will be going to Winterthur Gardens 
in Winterthur, Delaware on May 5th 
(Reading Day), leaving at 8:30 a.m. 
from the Security Building. This trip is 
free to anyone from our college. All in- 
terested people contact Jerry Fritz c/o 
Box 1133. We are planning on being 
back to DVC by 3 p.m. 

Campus News 

Our rock garden on campus is near 
completion. More Dwarf Conifers will be 
planted for an A- Day educational dis- 
play. This garden is a walk-through gar- 
den with all the plants labeled. This gar- 
den is to be named the Martin Brooks 
Conifer Garden. The reason for this is 
that Marty Brooks '54, has given most of 
the plant material for the collection. 




Some students really cleanup! 

Alumni Director 
Thanks Volunteers 

Dear Editor, 

Phonathon '87 was a great success 
thanks to the many students who volun- 
teered their time and enthusiasm. Please 
join me in showing appreciation to the 
following students who helped raise 
1,019 pledges for $85,140: Darren Alles 
'89, Beth Bevins '89, Ray Boltz '87, 
Greg Christiansen '88, Joanne Clemens 
'88, Michelle Dobbs '90, Anthony Dono- 
frio '88, Jerry Fritz '87, Kelley Hadesty 
'89, Kelvin Hatch '90. Donna Hayek 
'88, Art Hingst '87, Seamus McGlone 
'89, Jen Mease '88, Lori Ortiz '90. Wendy 
Raubenheimer '87, Vicki Reese '89, Bill 
Rein '87, Steve Rosenthal '88, John 
Stierly '89, Clair Thompson '88, Wendy 
Unger '87, Eric Vanden Berghe '88, Bill 
Weller '89, Brenda Werner '87 and Jim 
Yeager '89. 

Thank you all for a job well done! 

Sincerely, 
Linda A. Dolby 
Director, Alumni Affairs 

DRAMA AUDITIONS 

Highpoint Dinner Theatre will hold 
auditions for their 1987 Summer Season 
on Saturday, May 2nd, 11:00 a.m. to 
2:00 p.m. and Sunday, May 3rd, 1:00 
p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Summer Season is 
"The New Odd Couple" by Neil Simon 
(the new female version) playing July 
10th, 1987 through August 8th, 1987 
and "Play it Again Sam" by Woody Allen, 
August 14th through September 11th. 
Bring picture and resume. All roles open. 
Please contact Kristine Maloney Lewis at 
822-1951 for more information. 




DVC students working on the rock garden: 
Harold Wollman. Jerry Fritz and Frank Phillips 

Campus Clean-Up 

On April 8th, the Landscape-Nursery 
Club trooped out to clean-up our cam- 
pus. Twelve club members concentrated 
on picking up trash in the parking lot 
behind Elson Hall. Well, what luck! We 
managed to gather 27+ bags of trash. 
Within this trash we and found sneakers, 
chairs, bras, underwear and other vari- 
ous trash material. The winner by far was 
McDonald's, with their styrafoam "Big 
Mac" containers. It's really hard to 
believe all this trash was collected in IV2 
hours! Trash cans are out in the parking 
lot, so please use them. It won't hurt 
walking 10 feet or so to put it in the can. 

Thanks to all who helped and let's 
keep our campus cleaner in the future. 

A-Day Plant Sale 

Once again the Landscape-Nursery 
Club is having its annual A-Day Plant 
Sale. The plant sale will be in front of the 
Library. We are offering a wide assort- 
ment of plants for our sale. Some plants 
we will be selling are: Azaleas (seven 
varieties), Euonymus, Dwarf Pussy Wil- 
low, Holly (three varieties). Junipers 
(five varieties), Chamaecyparis (three 
varieties). Spirea, Inkberry. mixed Peren- 
nials sold in quart sizes and many more. 

The plants sold are reasonably priced. 
We want to sell as many plants as possi- 
ble. See you there. 

Obituaries 

Frisky 

(1970- 1987) 

by Melanie O'Neill 

I am sorry to report the untimely de- 
mise of our beloved friend, Frisky. Never 
again will his bleating meow be heard in 
the greenhouse, nor will classes be inter- 
rupted to open the door for her. No 
longer shall she beg me to feed her with 
crossed eyes. Her presence will be sorely 
missed. Frisky is survived by loving fami- 
ly and friends here at DVC who will re- 
member her always. 




POSITION OPENING 

Director of the Office 
of Continuing Education 

Job Summary: Responsible for a com- 
prehensive continuing education pro- 
gram which includes college credit and 
non-credit activities. The Director pro- 
vides day-to-day management, evalua- 
tion of programs and staff, facilitation of 
new ventures, preparation of budgets 
and development of external outreach 
programs. Continuing Education students 
are essentially part-time, degree or non- 
degree candidates, who are primarily on 
evening or summer session schedules. 
Some part-time day students also are 
serviced by this office. 

Duties and Responsibilities: 

1. Scheduling, advising and counseling 
of CE students in spring, fall and sum- 
mer credit sessions in day and even- 
ing time frames. 

2. Recruiting of CE students from area 
employers and community colleges. 

3. Developing external sites, at local 
employers and/or other facilities, for 
the teaching of credit and/or non- 
credit courses. 

4. Preparing and supervising the CE 
budget, including provisions for facili- 
ties, faculty and staff, advertising and 
public relations. 

5. Developing, independently and in 
coordination with academic depart- 
ments, credit and non-credit programs. 

6. Acquiring and evaluating, in coopera- 
tion with the academic departments, 
of CE faculty. 

7. Visibility in and interaction with the 
local business and scientific community 
and appropriate professional societies. 



NAMA / DVC 
ELECTION RESULTS 

by John Stierly 

The DVC Student Chapter of the Na- 
tional Agri-Marketing Association held its 
regular monthly meeting on Tuesday, 
April 7, 1987 and conducted officer elec- 
tions for the 1987-88 year. Officers are: 
John Stierly, President; Allison Angle, 
Vice President; Patty Rupell, Secretary; 
Dan Hoke, Treasurer; Kathy Johnson, 
Public Information Director; Kay Lo- 
baugh, A-Day Representative; and Fay 
Lobaugh, ICC Representative. 

Plans for the National NAMA Con- 
vention were finalized. The convention 
will be held in St. Louis from April 25 
through April 29. NAMA/DVC will be 
represented in St. Louis by Mary Ann 
Vogt, Allison Angle, Joe Diamond, 
John Stierly and Dr. John H. Avery. At 
this convention, NAMA/DVC will be 
recognized nationally as an officiaJ NAMA 
Student Chapter. The NAMA/DVC 
group will be participating in student 
workshops, professional meetings and 
will meet with other Student Chapters 
from across the United States. 

The NAMA/DVC marketing competi- 
tion team is being formed for next year. 
The team will be required to present a 
pre-determined marketing research proj- 
ect to a panel of judges, who are mem- 
bers of the professional NAMA Chapter. 
NAMA/DVC will be in competition with 
its sister chapter, Penn State NAMA, for 
the opportunity to advance to national 
competition at the 1988 National NAMA 
Convention. 

NAMA/DVC membership is open to 
ALL DVC students who may be interest- 
ed in the agri- marketing industry. See 
any offic